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Join us for a Swift Evening Out in Ottawa!
Chimney Swifts enter their roost
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Join us for a Swift Evening Out in Ottawa!

[caption id="attachment_21929" align="alignleft" width="289"]Chimney Swifts diving into chimney A flock of Chimney Swifts enters a roost in Wolville, Nova Scotia. Photo by A. MacDonald[/caption] Join Nature Canada for a Swift Evening Out in Ottawa on Wednesday, August 12th, at 7pm in the parking area of the Dalhousie Community Centre, at 755 Somerset Street West in Ottawa's Chinatown (map here and below). This event will showcase the aerial acrobatics of the Chimney Swift, one of Canada's most amazing species at risk. As their name suggests, these phenomenal migratory birds nest and roost in chimneys, as well as air ducts and other human structures. Because they are so closely associated with human structures, it's relatively easy to see Chimney Swifts in towns and cities across eastern Canada. And if you know where to look, it's easy to watch them return - en masse - to their roosts at dusk. That's where the idea for Swift Evening Out comes from!  Using an approach similar to public 'Swift Night Out' events held by naturalist groups elsewhere in the Chimney Swift's breeding range (e.g., the Nove Scotia-based Blomidon Naturalists Society), Nature Canada saw an opportunity to introduce residents of the National Capital Region to these oft overlooked and at-risk urban neighbours. Fortunately, the National Capital Region is home to several important Chimney Swift roosts, some of which harbour more than 200 birds each night during the late spring and early summer. Chimney Swifts are considered Threatened under Ontario's Endangered Species Act and Canada's Species at Risk Act. Our first Swift Evening Out event will begin in the parking lot of the Dalhousie Community Centre but will transition to the Dominican University College campus where we can watch the Chimney Swifts dive headfirst in unison into their nighttime roost - at 60 kilometres per hour! While the 'main event' will wrap up around 8:30pm, you are welcome to stay with us until after 9pm to try to get an accurate count of the birds entering the roost. At this time of year we are just on the cusp of the Swifts' southward migration and we anticipate a large number of birds to be present; they typically form large flocks that move together during their southward journey to the wintering grounds in northeastern South America. RSVP for the event using EventBrite. [caption id="attachment_21931" align="alignright" width="300"]Chimney Siwft in flight (Jim McCulloch) Chimney Swifts are sometimes called 'flying cigars' due to the shapre of their bodies while in flight. Photo by Jim McCulloch.[/caption] Of course, these birds haven't always used chimneys and other human structures (including barns) for nesting and roosting. Prior to extensive human settlement in eastern North America, Chimney Swifts would have used large, hollow standing dead trees, shallow caves and other natural sites as roosts. In fact, it's sometimes possible to still find Chimney Swifts using such roost sites in the wild where suitable old-growth forest habitats exist. Whatever the case, with the loss of their natural habitats Chimney Swifts have brilliantly adapted to using large chimneys for roosting and nesting. They are truly dependent on humans and our structures. But there's just one problem: the large chimneys that make the best habitat for Swifts are also in decline. With historic buildings and factories - and their chimneys - being demolished in cities and towns across the continent, in addition to many residential chimneys being capped, retrofitted and demolished, the Chimney Swift is even losing its artificial habitat. It's tough to be a species at risk, even if you rely on humans for habitat. Join us for this exciting event and learn more about these amazing birds, and what you can do to help them!  

Financial assistance for this project has been provided by: Govt of Ontario logo

White Swan logo (white)

  Need directions? The Swift Evening Out event will take place in the parking lot of the Dalhousie Community Centre, at 755 Somerset Street West, shown below:

Join our NatureBlitz! Nature Canada celebrates Moth Week in the capital!
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Join our NatureBlitz! Nature Canada celebrates Moth Week in the capital!

[caption id="attachment_19913" align="alignleft" width="300"]Cedar Waxwing Join our NatureBlitz to see birds like these Cedar Waxwings![/caption]

Join Nature Canada and local nature experts for a NatureBlitz on Saturday, July 18th and Sunday, July 19th in Ottawa's Carlington Woods area! The event will feature walks, talks and presentations over a 24-hour period from 12pm Saturday until 12pm Sunday (map and full schedule below).

Help us explore your NatureHood, and try your hand at using an ultrasonic bat detector! NatureBlitzes are a great way to get outside and learn about nature with members of your community and local nature experts! This is the first survey of its kind in the Carlington Woods area and we hope to identify as many different living things as possible at the site (map below).

Visitor events will include themed guided walks during which guests can learn to identify the plants, birds, amphibian, reptiles and insects found in Carlington Woods. The walks will also have a special focus on local species at risk, including Little Brown and Northern Long-eared bats, Barn and Bank Swallows, Chimney Swifts and Monarch butterflies. So get your binoculars, hiking boots and flashlights ready and come join us as we get up close and personal with a world of mystery right outside your door. It's nearby nature! And it's your NatureHood! Don't have binoculars? No field guide? No flashlight? Don't worry! You can borrow one of ours. We have 8 pairs of binoculars, bilingual field guides and some head-lamps available to sign-out at the Nature Canada tent once you've registered for a guided walk. And we'll have handheld ultrasonic bat detectors available for sign-out, too! [caption id="attachment_16786" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of expert examining tree bark Jennifer is using a small hand held magnifying glass to examine the lichen on tree bark. Don't be afraid to look at the world from a new perspective. You might be surprised at the beautiful details that are easily overlooked.[/caption] Check the schedule to see which walk(s) you would like to join, or come out for all of them! Beginners, experts and especially kids and their families are welcome to this FREE event! We hope to see you there! Saturday, July 18, 2015 You've heard him present the "Tweet of the Week" on CBC, now join Alex MacDonald as he leads a scavenger hunt for kids and listens for evening birds. [caption id="attachment_21555" align="aligncenter" width="960"]NatureBlitz Schedule for Saturday, July 18 2015 Join us for afternoon, evening or nighttime walks on Saturday, July 18, 2015. We'll be celebrating National Moth Week with local experts and checking out which species of bats are flying around the area![/caption] Sunday, July 19, 2015 [caption id="attachment_21556" align="aligncenter" width="960"]NatureBlitz Schedule for Sunday, July 19 2015 Don't miss "Save the Salamanders" with Matt Ellerbeck at 11am, and rise with the early birds to join Emily Bird as she points out our feathered friends at 7am![/caption]   Please check-in and register at the Nature Canada tent when you arrive. The tent/basecamp for the event will be located at the end Morriset Avenue (1503 Morriset) just before the fence to the city's reservoir area. Look for the blue tent. [caption id="attachment_21568" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Map of Carlington Woods area, Ottawa, Ontario Carlington Woods is nestled between the communities of Carlington, Central Park and Copeland Park-Bel Air Heights-Braemar Park. Find us in the blue tent at the end of Morriset Avenue! Map provided by Google.[/caption]   A special Thank You to all the experts who will be sharing their expert knowledge and passion with us at this event! Financial support for this initiative is provided in part by through the Government of Ontario's Species at Risk Stewardship Fund, and White Swan. Govt of Ontario logo White Swan logo (white)

The Third Annual Bird Day Fair Soars
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The Third Annual Bird Day Fair Soars

On Saturday May 30, 2015 Nature Canada hosted the third annual Bird Day Fair at Andrew Haydon Park. It was a day where Canadian's welcomed back our migratory birds in a celebration of International Migratory Bird Day in the national capital region's own Important Bird Area. 80% of the bird species that we consider Canadian birds leave our borders every fall and return every spring. Bird Day connects communities across the Northern Hemisphere in a celebration of this incredible journey. [caption id="attachment_21236" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of bird banding Banding an American Robin. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Excited early risers joined Nature Canada’s very own licensed bird bander, Ted Cheskey in the early bird activity: a bird banding demonstration. Ted and his assistants caught an American Robin (pictured above) and a Song Sparrow. Bird banding is a popular research method used by scientists to study birds and learn about their migration and survival. The information collected when the bird is captured along with the band number is shared on a central database that registered bird banders can access. Some birds are caught two or more times at the same or different locations. Participants at the event also had the opportunity to visit the Innis Point Bird Observatory’s booth and learn about bird banding first hand by being banded themselves. Each band shared a number with a bird banded at Innis Point Bid Observatory. You can see which birds were chosen and learn about their story here. [caption id="attachment_21237" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of the Bird Day Fair 2015 the 2015 Bird Day Fair at Andrew Haydon Park. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] 24 local groups hosted a booth at the Bird Day Fair to talk about the excellent work they do to protect wildlife and connect Canadian’s to nature and adventure in the city and beyond. [caption id="attachment_21238" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of a child completing the activity passport at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] An activity passport encouraged children to visit the booths and ask questions. A correct answer was rewarded with a stamp or sticker, and children who answered all the questions visited the Nature Canada booth for a prize. [caption id="attachment_21239" align="aligncenter" width="940"]nest building activity at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Local artist Sally Lee Sheeks was back this year with her popular nest building activity. Children used sticks and branches to build a bird’s nest large enough for a person to sit in. Building a nest is more difficult than it looks, and the birds have to do it all with their beaks! [caption id="attachment_21241" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Eagle mascot at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] A giant Eagle also joined the celebrations. Although his day was busy posing for photos, here he is helping a volunteer take a survey. Surveys are an important way for us to learn about what we are doing right, and what we can improve on for next year. The feedback we have received on these surveys has been extremely useful, so a big thank you to everyone who took the time to share their thoughts. [caption id="attachment_21242" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Falcon Ed at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Falcon Ed was back with their live birds of prey. These birds are always a crowd favourite and wowed the crowd all day long at the Falcon Ed booth. Participants got to meet Phoennix the Harris Hawk (pictured above), Darwin the Great Horned Owl and Dexter the Peregrine Falcon. [caption id="attachment_21243" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Little Rays Reptiles at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] Little Ray’s Reptiles presented their "Endangered Ontario" show at the Bird Day Fair and captivated the audience. Their show featured 2 birds of prey, 2 ferrets, 2 snakes, 2 turtles an amphibian and a fox - all from Ontario of course! [caption id="attachment_21244" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Print making activity at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Young and young at heart alike got to try out their artistic skills with help from local artist Lyle Docherty in a print making activity. Lyle had prepared templates of an American Robin, a Blue Jay (pictured above), a Bald Eagle, a Common Loon and a Canadian Goose for people to create their own work of art. [caption id="attachment_21245" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Mayor Waston and Giacomo Panico announce the Ottawa's Bird Contest winner And the winner is.... Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] And the winner of the unofficial Bird of Ottawa Contest is ......... the Black-capped Chickadee! On April 25 CBC radio’s In Town and Out asked listeners and followers of the weekly Tweet of the Week segment to nominate their favourite. After a month of voting and over 3,300 submissions the winner was announced at the Bird Day Fair by Mayor Jim Watson and Giacomo Panico. The Black-capped Chickadee was the clear favourite with 42% of the votes. The Common Raven gained a great deal of support near the end of the competition, but was not able to overtake the lead, ending with 32% of the vote. [caption id="attachment_21269" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure A Flamingo Flash Mob. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] A flock of migrating Flamingos go blown very off course, astonishing and amazing attendees of the Bird Day Fair with their coordinated moves. Young dancers from Lakeview Public School dressed as Flamingos made a surprise appearance at the Bird Day Fair to perform their Flamingo Dance choreographed by dance teacher Lindsay Mattesz. This performance was clearly a crowd favourite. [caption id="attachment_21246" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Purple Martin colony The Purple Martin Colony at the Nepean Sailing Club. Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] Nature Canada is working on the Purple Martin project, an international collaboration with Purple Matin landloards, university researchers, naturalists groups, and the Canadian Wildlife Service to help protect and recover declining Purple Martin populations. We are using GPS tracking devices to follow them on their migration journey to their wintering grounds in order to understand the risks they face. One colony that Nature Canada is studying is just a short walk from Andrew Haydon Park at the Nepean Sailing Club. A guided walk led by the Purple Martin project coordinator gave people the opportunity to see these birds up close and in action. If you look closely you just might be able to see a tracking device or a coloured leg band on one of these birds. [caption id="attachment_21265" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure Tony Beck of Always an Adventure captivates the crowd as he shares his nature photography tips. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Participants at the Bird Day Fair were invited to join a guided walk to learn the basics of birding, get some tips to improve their nature photos and more. [caption id="attachment_21267" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure Photography by Susanne Ure [/caption] And what’s a Bird Day Fair without bird watching? This family of ducks posed for the cameras. Some other species that we expected to see at the park are; Purple Martin, Tree Swallow, Yellow-rumped Warbler, American Redstart, Ring-billed Gull, Killdeer, Canada Goose, American Goldfinch, Yellow Warbler and Hooded Merganser. Thank you to our Event Partners and Sponsors who made this day possible!

Environment for the Americas logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo OC Transpo logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
Nikon logo Henry's logo Richie Feed and Seed logo White Swan logo

Come out to the Bird Day Fair May 2015
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Come out to the Bird Day Fair May 2015

Bird Day Fair 2015 event poster Join Nature Canada at the third annual Bird Day Fair which will be held at Andrew Haydon Park in Ottawa on Saturday May 30, 2015 from 10am-3pm. Just as our migratory birds are returning to Canada from their wintering grounds south of the border, a huge celebration is unfolding across the continent to celebrate birds – and you can be part of it! Bird Day is a celebration of migratory birds and the wild spaces they inhabit. Join Nature Canada in a celebration of the incredible migration journey of birds through a day of fun activities for the whole family. There will be nature walks, crafts and activities, live animals, and an opportunity to meet local groups working to protect wildlife.     [caption id="attachment_20261" align="aligncenter" width="960"]photos from the Bird Day Fair 2014 Photography by Susanne Ure of the Bird Day Fair 2014[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Participating groups"] The following groups will host a booth at the Bird Day Fair to talk about the excellent work they do to protect wildlife and connect Canadian's to nature and adventure in the city and beyond.

Always and Adventure logo BioRegional logo Canadian Geographic logo City Wide Sports logo
Falcon Ed logo FLAP Canada Ottawa Wing logo Girl Guides of Canada logo Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital Logo
Greening Sacred Spaces Ottawa Chapter logo Henry's logo Innis Point Bird Observatory logo Kitchen Cone logo
Lindian Enterprise logo Maser Gardeners of Ottawa Carleton logo Mississippi valley conservation authority logo Nature Conservancy of Canada logo
Ottawa Duck Club logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo St John Ambulance logo Tucker House logo
Tree Ottawa logo Wax and Wings logo Wild Bird Care Centre logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
Little Rays Reptile Zoo logo circus delights Sally Sheeks logo
Archy and Mehitabel logo Maria-Helena Pacelli logo Angry Drangonz logo Urban Cowboy logo
[separator headline="h2" title="Schedule for the day"] Early Bird Activity: Nature Canada's very own licensed bird bander, Ted Cheskey, will lead a bird banding demonstration at Andrew Haydon Park from 8:30 am-10:00 am Check out what happened at the Bird Day Fair 2014. Stay up to date on the latest Bird Day Fair plans on the facebook event page. Schedule Guided Walks poster ENG [separator headline="h2" title="Plan your trip to the Bird Day Fair"] Map to Andrew Haydon ParkThe Bird Day Fair will be held at Andrew Haydon Park (3169 Carling Avenue, Nepean) which is at the intersection of Carling Ave and Holly Acres Rd. [separator headline="h3" title="Cycle or Walk"] Andrew Haydon Park is along the Ottawa River bike path. Check the cycling map to plan your route. [separator headline="h3" title="Take Public Transit"] OC Transpo is the easy way to get to the event! Take the Bird Day Fair shuttle bus provided by OC Transpo from Bayshore station, a transit hub. The shuttle will depart from transit station 4A (see the highlight space on the map below) and drop you off steps from the Fair. The shuttle is free of charge and will run every 15 min from 10am - 3pm. station 4A map [separator headline="h3" title="Driving"] Please remember that there is limited parking on site. [separator headline="h2" title="Partners"] Nature Canada is proud to partner with the following organizations to host Bird Day 2015
Environment for the Americas logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo OC Transpo logo
  [separator headline="h2" title="Sponsors"] Thank you to the generous support of our sponsors. Without whom this event would not be possible.
Ottawa Field Naturalists logo Nikon logo Henry's logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
White Swan logo Richie Feed and Seed logo

Canada’s environment is central to Canadians’ prosperity, says coalition of environmental organizations
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Canada’s environment is central to Canadians’ prosperity, says coalition of environmental organizations

Last week, the Green Budget Coalition released a report, Recommendations for Budget 2015, which encourages the Government of Canada to take certain measures to advance environmental sustainability and stimulate innovation and economic opportunities. "The Green Budget Coalition believes strongly that adopting the recommendations in his document will be invaluable for providing Canadians with a healthy environment, a thriving, sustainable economy and the opportunity to live healthy lives today and far into the future," said Andrew Van Iterson, Manager of the Green Budget Coalition. The report focuses on three strategic areas:

  1. Energy innovation and climate change leadership
  2. Achieving Canada's conservation commitments
  3. Ensuring healthy communities for all Canadians

[button link="http://greenbudget.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Green-Budget-Coalitions-Recommendations-for-Budget-2015-November-12-2014.pdf" size="medium" target="_self" color="alternative-1" lightbox="false"]Read the full report here[/button]


Nature Canada is a member of the Green Budget Coalition. The Coalition brings together the collective expertise of fourteen of Canada’s leading environmental and conservation organizations, representing over 600,000 Canadians, to present an analysis of the most pressing issues regarding environmental sustainability in Canada and to make a consolidated annual set of recommendations to the federal government regarding strategic fiscal and budgetary opportunities.  

Endangered species stand a chance of recovering with young nature lovers on their side
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Endangered species stand a chance of recovering with young nature lovers on their side

"What kinds of obstacles do migratory birds face?", asked a Nature Canada conservation specialist during a visit to an Ottawa grade one class. "No food!", said one child. "Predators!", said another. As part of Nature Canada's outreach and education activities, we have been working with elementary schools across the city of Ottawa to raise awareness of the challenges migratory birds face and provide suggestions for small things kids can do at home to protect wildlife. Hundreds of school children from grade one to grade six have heard mini, child-friendly presentations by Nature Canada staff on local endangered birds. They've also made colourful bird masks, played a game simulating the challenges of migration and have even used their creativity to help produce a unique stop-motion animation featuring three endangered birds found in the area. [one_third]kids with masks - Copy[/one_third] [one_third]close up of kids with masks[/one_third] [one_third_last]kids running with masks - Copy[/one_third_last] Just yesterday, the kids of Regina Elementary School were invited to the Canadian Museum of Nature to tour the museum's Birds of Canada gallery with a Nature Canada conservation specialist on hand to enhance the experience. They had an amazing time and were fascinated by the variety of bird species in Canada. kids at museum looking at bird displayThey later joined a reception for Nature Canada members held at the Museum of Nature and were able to watch the first version of their stop-motion animation video. They were very pleased with the video they had helped to create! When Eleanor Fast, Executive Director of Nature Canada, wrapped-up the reception, she ended her remarks by asking if anyone had questions or comments. A Regina School student's hand shot up. "I'm very sad about Blanding's Turtle," he said. Indeed, we are all very sad about the decline of Blanding's Turtle. Thankfully, Blanding's Turtle stands a chance of surviving when kids like this little lad care about protecting it.  

Kids make movie about local species at risk
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Kids make movie about local species at risk

When children from Ottawa elementary schools were asked to name a species at risk most answered with 'polar bear!'. Endangered bird species that nest or roost in Ottawa were rarely mentioned. Hoping to bring greater awareness to local species at risk, Nature Canada's NatureHood team paid visits to over a dozen Ottawa-area schools, meeting with 700 children in kindergarten through to grade seven. Staff gave presentations about four of Ottawa's species at risk - chimney swift, bobolink, barn swallow and monarch butterfly - and introduced simple actions that could be taken to help protect the species, ranging from keeping cats indoors to installing a bird feeder. The children were also invited to participate in the making of a unique video about the species. Made from the compilation of colourful drawings made by the children, the movie will depict scenes from an average day in the life of all four species. Below is a selection of drawings that caught our eye. Stay tuned for the video! [caption id="attachment_17768" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Chimney swifts roost inside a brick chimney. Chimney swifts climb a brick chimney.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17771" align="aligncenter" width="960"]A bobolink in flight A bobolink in flight[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17769" align="aligncenter" width="960"]A barn swallow flying over a farmer's field. A barn swallow flying over a farmer's field.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17767" align="aligncenter" width="960"]Chimney swifts entering and leaving a chimney. Chimney swifts entering and leaving a chimney.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17772" align="aligncenter" width="960"]A barn swallow with its young. A barn swallow with its young.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_17773" align="aligncenter" width="960"]A chimney swift in flight. A chimney swift in flight.[/caption]

Conservation groups standing up for nature in Ottawa
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Conservation groups standing up for nature in Ottawa

[caption id="attachment_17618" align="alignright" width="150"]Download brief on Bill C-40 that will be presented to the House. View the amendments contained in the brief that will be presented before the Standing Committee.[/caption] On October 29, 2014 at 4:30pm EST, Nature Canada's affiliate, Ontario Nature, will go before the House of Commons' Standing Committee on the Environment and Sustainable Development and ask for a stronger Bill C-40, a piece of legislation which will establish Canada's first urban park - the Rouge National Urban Park. Caroline Schultz, Executive Director of Ontario Nature, will present a set of five recommendations for amendments to the Act that will "clearly prioritize ecological integrity and require the protection of natural ecosystems and wildlife". Nature Canada stands by our Ontario affiliate and we are strongly supporting their efforts to improve this bill. Nature Canada deeply believes in the importance of creating an urban national park. Our NatureHood initiative is designed to help connect city-living Canadians with their nearby nature. Nature Canada has also been advocating for more national parks for the bulk of our 75 year history and we're proud to have played a role in the creation of over 63 million acres of parks and protected national wildlife areas in Canada. Unfortunately, Bill C-40 is weak and needs to be strengthened. As it stands, the legislation fails to meet standards for sustainability and ecological health and integrity set out in existing policies that cover Rouge Park. If you're as excited as we are about good, healthy urban parks, join us in cheering on Caroline Schultz on October 29, 2014 when she speaks before the Standing Committee on the Environment and Sustainable Development.

***Postponed*** Ottawa children take part in a ‘migration’ parade
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***Postponed*** Ottawa children take part in a ‘migration’ parade

***POSTPONED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE DUE TO SHOOTING ON PARADE ROUTE*** October 22, 2014 (OTTAWA) - Nature Canada would like to invite media to attend a one-of-a-kind parade in the heart of Ottawa today, October 22, 2014. In celebration of Canada’s migratory birds, kindergarten children from Ottawa-area schools will participate in a guided ‘migratory’ walk from Parliament Hill to Ottawa City Hall where they will be welcomed by the Mexican Embassy and Eleanor Fast, Nature Canada’s Executive Director. Just over 200 children carrying colourful masks depicting the vibrant plumage of migratory birds and butterflies will encounter ‘obstacles’ along their walk, such as windy weather, that will raise awareness of the challenges facing migratory birds as they make their perilous journey to wintering grounds in the southern hemisphere. The Mexican Embassy will be providing refreshments at the end of the ‘migratory journey’ and there will be a brief presentation about the shared interest Canada and Mexico have in protecting migratory birds. The parade will begin at the Metcalfe Street entrance of Parliament Hill at 11:00am and will end at 12:25pm in front of Ottawa City Hall. If you are interested in attending and photographing or filming the event, please contact Nature Canada. Although it is a public event, some parents have requested that their child not be photographed or filmed and we would like to do our best to honour their wishes. -30- [one_third][separator headline="h2" title="Media Contacts:"] Paul Jorgenson Senior Communications Manager 613-562-3447 ext 248 pjorgenson@naturecanada.ca Monica Tanaka Communications Coordinator 613-562-3447 ext 241 mtanaka@naturecanada.ca [/one_third] [one_third][separator headline="h2" title="About Nature Canada"] Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Over the past 75 years, we’ve helped protect over 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and the countless species that depend on this habitat. Today, we represent a network of over 45,000 members & supporters and more than 350 nature organizations in every province across Canada.[/one_third] [one_third_last][separator headline="h2" title="Parade route"] parade route [/one_third_last]

Nature Canada to host community fall BioBlitz in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area
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Nature Canada to host community fall BioBlitz in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area

OTTAWA (September 10, 2014) ― Nature Canada and naturalist experts from across the National Capital Region are gathering this weekend to host a fall “BioBlitz” in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area near Britannia Park. The event is open to the general public and is part of a larger effort to learn more about the state of local biodiversity and catalogue changes over time in population patterns. The event runs over a 24 hour period from 3pm on Friday to 3pm on Saturday and includes guided tours for the general public focussing on how to identify groups such as plants, birds, amphibians and reptiles. “Our goal is to involve the general public in the scientific process and to have fun while doing it,” said Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas. MacDonald continued, “our hope is that lots of people join us for a fun, engaging day at this unique urban wilderness site”. MacDonald and other Ottawa-area naturalist experts are aiming to locate, identify and photograph as many different species as possible around the site in a 24 hour period. For more information including a full schedule of events and directions to the site, members of the general public are encouraged to visit: http://naturecanada.ca/news/blog/nature-canadas-fall-bioblitz-at-mud-lake/

- 30 -

[one_half][separator headline="h2" title="Media Contacts:"] Paul Jorgenson, Senior Communications Manager 613-562-3447 ext 248 | pjorgenson@naturecanada.ca Sarah Kirkpatrick-Wahl, Conservation Coordinator 613-562-3447 ext 252 | skirkpatrick-wahl@naturecanada.ca Monica Tanaka, Communications Coordinator 613-562-3447 ext 241 | mtanaka@naturecanada.ca [/one_half] [one_half_last][separator headline="h2" title="About Nature Canada"] Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Over the past 75 years, we’ve helped protect over 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and the countless species that depend on this habitat. Today, we represent a network of over 45,000 members & supporters and more than 350 nature organizations in every province across Canada.[/one_half_last]

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