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Nina Andrascik: A Young Woman for Nature and Young Leader
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Nina Andrascik: A Young Woman for Nature and Young Leader

Nina Andrascik is a Young Woman for Nature and recipient of the Young Leaders grant. This grant is what helped her found WE GO, the Women for the Environment and the Great Outdoors Club which engages female first and second generation Canadians and International students to enjoy Canada’s great outdoors. Nina is also a team member of Ocean Bridge and contributes local service to engage youth in ocean conservation. Nina recently graduated from Nepean High School in Ottawa, Ontario, and will be pursuing a Bachelors of Science (BSc) Natural Resources Conservation at the University of British Columbia, at the Vancouver campus this fall. She is excited to further her studies and to discover everything that British-Colombia has to offer. Nina pinpointed one of the first moments when she felt the most connected to nature was in her grade ten outdoor education class, when she was on a canoe trip through Algonquin Park. Being thrown into a new environment, with just themselves, their canoes, and the natural beauty of the park, the group connected in a way that simply would not be attainable between four walls of a traditional classroom setting.

As a Young Woman for Natures

Awareness, connection and gratitude are the three words Nina used to describe her experience as a Young Woman for Nature. She mentions that a huge takeaway from this experience was the relationship that she built with Dawn Carr, her mentor through the program. Building this relationship made her realize that there are great people that occupy positions of leadership who are encouraging, and interested, and who are ready to take the time to provide guidance and support to the next generation. Conversely, this experience showed Nina the challenges of getting people involved in the environmental movement. Due to the many elements that today’s youth needs to balance, it is easy for youth to miss the chance to get outside and enjoy nature.

Taking Action

Nina said that “being a Young Woman for Nature empowered me, and put me into a leadership position to get others involved.” The grant that Nina received through Women for Nature allowed her to start WEGO, her club that provide outdoor experience to girls in my school who weren’t involved in an outdoor education class to get out and participate in a variety of activities that some had never done before. The short-term goal of WEGO was to get first and second generation Canadians exposed to outdoor experiences and activities to help them establish new friendships and an appreciation for nature and Canada.  Nina shares that “The long-term vision is to have this initiative continue to gain enough momentum to potentially have our head of outdoor ed and school administration consider establishing an all women's outdoor ed class which allow different cultures to more easily participate.

A Nature lover now, and forever.

Nina summed it up perfectly, stating that, “Nature is everything and always will be. It was here long before iPhones, computers, humans, and even dinosaurs. […] Nature has been a constant thing on earth that should be infinite. Nature and the environment is what sustains us and keep us connected to our roots. For these reasons I feel that everyone should feel the importance of protecting our heritage and enjoy the beauty of what was here long before any of us.”
Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.

Shelby Kutyn: An Artist, Environmentalist and Young Woman for Nature
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Shelby Kutyn: An Artist, Environmentalist and Young Woman for Nature

Shelby Kutyn is a Young Women for Nature mentee, and a student at the University of Victoria, where she will be completing the final year of her Bachelors of Science degree, with a double major in Marine Biology and Earth and Ocean Sciences. She is spending this summer working as a research assistant at an oyster aquaculture farm, where her research focusses on tracking environmental patterns that will enable them to predict when Vibrio parahaemolyticus outbreaks will occur, thus helping reduce the risk of sickness from eating oysters. Having grown up on Vancouver Island, and surrounded by nature, pinpointing a specific moment when she realized her love for nature was difficult. Shelby spent much of her childhood camping, visiting parks such as Goldstream Park during the salmon spawn and exploring the great diversity of beaches on the Island. She says that these childhood experiences are “what drove me to pursue biology, and more specifically marine biology in school. I want to be a marine biologist because I love the ocean and I want to contribute to restoring it to its historical health.” Shelby first became involved with Nature after her supervisor at Science Venture mentioned the Women for Nature mentorship initiative. At the time she was a science instructor with Science Venture, which a non-profit organization that delivers hands-on science workshops and camps for youth. Every week, Shelby would teach STEM to a girls club for students that flourished in non-traditional school settings. This presented Shelby with the opportunity to run hands-on experiments and activities with them, thus facilitating learning that was experiential. Being involved in the Young Women for Nature mentorship initiative turned the tables on Shelby, and was, as she puts it “inspiring, and thought-provoking.” Her mentor Stephanie Foster provided help whenever she needed, shared her perspective on environmental work from the consulting side, and connected her with other women who are pursuing research in areas of study related to marine biology. Shelby has felt the positive impact of this mentorship on her life – one that she aims to carry in her future endeavors as an environmentalist. While completing her BSc. Degree with a double major in Marine Biology and Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria, she will also be working toward environmental conservation and awareness through her artwork. She says that her work “Focuses on animals that are native to the BC coast and those that are endangered. By showing the intrinsic beauty of these animals in their natural habitats I hope to make people aware of the environmental threats these animals face and inspire people to take action and speak out for these animals’ rights.” She sells prints and originals of paintings and donates part of the proceeds to non-profit organizations to help fund research, media campaigns, and other initiatives that work towards saving our environment and the biodiversity it contains.


Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.

Olivia DesRoches: A Young Woman For Nature
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Olivia DesRoches: A Young Woman For Nature

Olivia DesRoches is a Young Woman for Nature, and a Grade 12 student at Hampton High School who first became involved with Nature Canada after receiving the Young Nature Leadership Grant, and then as a Women for Nature mentee. The Young Nature Leadership Grant was awarded to Olivia for a project that her grade 11 Math class was hoping to get off the ground. Last Spring, after watching the documentary Before the Flood, Olivia and her classmates were motivated to do something that would help them and their community reduce their environmental impact. Together, they decided to build a greenhouse at their school.


Evidently, such a project required a significant amount of funding, and as such, Olivia set out to find ways to fund the project. The first grant for which she applied, and later received, was the Young Nature Leadership Grant with Nature Canada. Being the first scholarship the group received, it served as the starting point that legitimized their project, and helped them begin to move forward. After receiving the Nature Canada grant on Earth Day, in April of 2017, the students spent the remainder of the school year and summer working together to raise funds through the community and local businesses. Come September, the project was fully funded. Planning for the greenhouse began in September of 2017, and the construction began soon after a groundbreaking ceremony for the greenhouse held in New Brunswick, to which the Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick, and Nature Canada's Board of Directors, including a few Women For Nature members, attended. Since then, groups of students aged between nine and eighteen years  old have been working on the greenhouse. Two to three times a week after school, sometimes pulling classes to help with various parts of the construction, the students worked to get the greenhouse standing and airtight (protected from the elements) before the first snowfall, then began again after the weather started to ‘let up’ near the end of February. Olivia’s love for nature and dedication to the planet is evident from her hard work and initiative. She said that spending time at summer camp as a camper and then counselor for the past five summers solidified her love for spending time in nature, and appreciation for the environment. Going further than an average nature lover, and as a Young Woman for Nature and Young Nature Leadership Grant recipient, Olivia was flown out to Ottawa in November 2017 for the Nature Canada: Women for Nature Parliamentary reception. There she was able to speak with other Young Women for Nature and Women for Nature, and present her project to Parks Canada. She also met with Senator Griffin, who is the Honorary Chair of Women for Nature and Olivia's local MP as well. She said that being able to attend the reception was one of the most defining experiences of this entire project. To “be in a room with people my own age and women, and to have similar mindsets and similar goals was really empowering.” Olivia is set to graduate from high school in the coming weeks, and to attend St Thomas University in Fredericton to pursue a Bachelor of Arts double major in Political Science and Psychology in the fall of 2018. Despite not pursuing a degree specific to environmental sciences, her experience as a Young Woman for Nature was encouraging because it enabled her to meet other women, and “hear their stories and [see that] so many of them didn’t have an environmental science degree […] and found ways to incorporate their love for nature into what they’re doing professionally.” The Hampton High School greenhouse is anticipated to open its doors this summer. We are excited to see the how the Greenhouse will grow throughout its first year, and the continuous growth that will be part of its many years to come.

Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.

Melissa Cusack Striepe: A Young Woman for Nature
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Melissa Cusack Striepe: A Young Woman for Nature

[caption id="attachment_37466" align="alignleft" width="150"] Julie Lopez, Digital Campaign Organizer at Nature Canada.[/caption] This blog was written by Julie Lopez, the Digital Campaign Organizer at Nature Canada. Melissa Cusack Striepe is a Young Woman for Nature that first became involved with Ontario Nature, then with Nature Canada through the Young Women for Nature mentorship initiative. She is currently a third-year student at McMaster University, pursuing a Bachelor’s of Engineering in Chemical Engineering with a minor in Sustainability. This summer she is completing an internship with the Water & Natural Environmental Department of Hatch, an engineering consulting firm in Burlington, Ontario. From a very early age, Melissa was immersed in nature. Both Melissa’s parents are very connected to the environment, which resulted in her spending a lot of time being active and outdoors throughout her childhood and teenage years. From her experience in outdoor Kindergarten in Germany, to time spent at her family’s hobby farm, to canoe trips in Temagami and on the French River – Melissa shared that

“ [Nature] was my classroom, and it was where I learned from the very beginning.”

The Ontario Nature Youth Council came into the picture of Melissa’s life when she was in 7th grade – and wanted to attend the Ontario Nature Youth Summit. Despite not yet being in high school, Melissa was already keen to become involved and to meet others that were similarly invested in the environment. For the next seven years, Melissa was a part of the Ontario Nature Youth Council. She partook in various projects and events in the Greater Toronto Area, and said of the experience that it was a “great opportunity to connect with people who cared about the same topics, and feeling like my concerns for the environment were real.” It was from her active involvement in the Youth Council that Melissa was informed of Nature Canada’s Young Women for Nature mentorship initiative.  As someone that is always looking for opportunities to engage a larger network, Melissa applied for the opportunity to be a mentee, and much to her delight, was accepted. Having moved away from her hometown to pursue a Bachelor’s of Engineering degree in Chemical Engineering at McMaster, Melissa is now occupying an advisory role for the Ontario Nature Youth Council. At the same time as she is providing guidance to the council, she has been receiving guidance from her Woman for Nature mentor for her own environmental endeavors in the engineering field. Of the mentorship initiative, Melissa has said that some of the most valuable moments come from “ […] choosing to take those opportunities to build your network, and to build those connections that you can.” She highlights the importance of active involvement and shares how doing so has enabled her to acquire more knowledge, learn new skills, and grow her network. Her passion for the environment and desire to learn are encouraging. Here at Nature Canada we are very excited to hear more about Melissa’s environmental endeavors in the engineering field, and to continue to see her growth within the Young Women for Nature mentorship initiative.

Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.


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Jenny Jachtorowicz: A Young Woman For Nature Mentee
Jenny
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Jenny Jachtorowicz: A Young Woman For Nature Mentee

[caption id="attachment_37466" align="alignleft" width="150"] Julie Lopez, Digital Campaign Organizer at Nature Canada.[/caption] This blog post was written by Julie Lopez, the Digital Campaign Organizer at Nature Canada. Jenny Jachtorowicz is a second year student at Carleton University, pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in Forensic Psychology. Jenny first became involved with Nature Canada as a Young Woman for Nature mentee for the Women for Nature mentorship initiative, shortly after being a member of the Youth Council with Ontario Nature. As a student of Forensic Psychology, Jenny will have a unique entry point to the environmental industry, and her Women for Nature mentor, Margaret Beckel, the Director of the Museum of Nature, has helped her connect the dots between her passion, studies and professional aspirations. Joining her love for the environment to her interest in Forensic Psychology, Jenny is looking to base her upcoming thesis on the reasoning and factors behind civil disobedience motivated by environmental concerns. The subject of environmental crime and psychology is incredibly interesting, and, with little research on its subject to date, further studies of it will make Jenny an innovator in the field. Her love for the environment, and learning in nature spurred in grade 10, when her high school collaborated with the Public Board Bronte Creek Project: Trail Program. In this program, Jenny was able to complete four high school credits in an outdoor setting. Their classes would take place in a cabin; however, they spent the remainder of their time doing work outside and in nature. This experience opened her eyes to sustainability and enabled her to get out of the traditional classroom setting.

As an Ontario Nature Youth Council Member

The following year, Jenny became a member of Ontario Nature’s Youth Council. Her journey with Ontario Nature began after she saw a post about their Youth Summit on social media, and was motivated to meet other people that were equally passionate about the environment.  Following the weekend retreat, she became involved with the Ontario Nature Youth Council and began her journey championing various environmental endeavors across Ontario. Over the past three years, Jenny has been involved in many projects with Ontario Nature. One of the most prominent projects was the Pollinator Project – for which Ontario Nature partnered with Bee City Canada to encourage towns, regions and cities to put forward declarations to take actions to protect spaces for pollinators. Jenny was the driving force behind making Halton, her hometown region a Bee Friendly region, and is setting her sights on making Carleton University the first ‘Bee Friendly Campus’ in the nation’s capital. [caption id="attachment_37483" align="aligncenter" width="960"] The Ontario Nature Youth Council. Photo provided by Jenny.[/caption]

A Young Woman for Nature Mentee

Most recently, Jenny became a Young Woman for Nature mentee with Nature Canada, and a mentee as part of the Women for Nature mentorship pilot. She said her experience as a mentee was interesting, eye opening and motivating. Jenny mentioned how valuable it was to have Margaret as a mentor because, while she does not have a nature or environmental degree, she was, nonetheless, working as the Director for the Canadian Museum of Nature. Jenny mentions how “it was interesting to speak with someone in the environmental field,” and that, “as someone that is pursuing a degree that is not directly connected to nature, it is interesting to see how other people can get there.” Margaret helped her see the possibility for any educational experience or degree to cater to environmentalism, in addition to how to gain different, and useful skill sets that will advantageous when entering the workforce.

Next Steps

This summer Jenny will be working as a research assistant at Carleton University for the Geography and Cartography Department. She will also be continuing to champion to make Ottawa a better environment for pollinators – and is working toward having Carleton University become the first Bee Friendly Campus in the Nation’s capital.

Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.


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Sevrenne Sheppard: A Young Woman for Nature from Coast to Coast
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Sevrenne Sheppard: A Young Woman for Nature from Coast to Coast

Sevrenne Sheppard is a Young Woman for Nature that hails from Vancouver Island, and that will be graduating this October with a Bachelor of Arts in Environment and Ecological Determinants of Health in Society with a minor in Urban Systems Geography at McGill University, in Montreal, QC. Sevrenne first became involved with Nature Canada as a Young Women for Nature following the suggestion of a former colleague that she apply for the Young Women for Nature mentorship initiative. Sevrenne successfully applied to the mentorship initiative – effectively combining her love for the environment and interest in connecting with women who share similar passions, values and goals.

From Marmots on Vancouver Island to Urban Greenspaces at McGill University

Although she is just completing her Honours Bachelor degree, Sevrenne has extensive and impressive experience in the environmental field. Her journey began very early on, when she was in third grade and endeavored to raise donations and awareness for the recovery of the Vancouver Island Marmot population, which had reached a record low of 30 marmots at the time. Since that first foray, she has worked with environmental organizations across the country. Going back to the summer of 2014, Sevrenne was an instructor with Science Venture at University of Victoria, and then spent the following summer as an Outreach Instructor with Actua in the Arctic for eight communities in the Kivaliq and Kitikmeot regions of Nunavut. After that, she started an arts-based environmental education program in Haida Gwaii between January and April of 2016. Later that year, she interned with Jane’s Walk in Toronto, and finally coordinated SOYL leadership program with Fresh Roots in Vancouver in 2017. Currently, Sevrenne is living in the metropolitan city of Montreal. Despite being surrounded by buildings, she has stayed connected to nature through a market gardening apprenticeship with the Concordia Greenhouse Project, and has remained active in her nearby nature with frequent runs around Montreal’s urban greenspaces and parks, such as Parc Lafontaine. [caption id="attachment_37467" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Sevrenne.[/caption]

As a Young Woman for Nature

So far, Sevrenne described her experience as a Young Woman for Nature mentee as
“Grounding, inspiring and learnful.” (Learnful being a word that she “made up [herself] and now uses all the time because it is so relevant to [her] life.”)
Sevrenne highlighted the support and insight that her mentor, Cara Clairman, the President and CEO of Plug’nDrive, provided: “She’s very supportive and encouraging and […] made me feel much more equipped with a vision of what the future holds, and equipped to reach the goals that I have for my professional life.” Overall, the experience as a Young Woman for Nature “Helped me to see what my options are and feel like I don’t have to make one big choice – I can try things out and see how they go. At this early point in my career, it’s more about finding out what I like to do and what I’m good at – and also finding out what I don’t like too! And that can mean taking wrong turns, taking risks, making mistakes. My main takeaway is reassurance that it is all part of the process, and the process is supposed to be a little messy.” For those who are looking to become involved in the environmental movement, Sevrenne recommends, “to not be afraid to try new things […]. All of those experiences are valuable and give you a better sense of what your strengths are, which can build your capacity in whatever work you do! Finding people who you love to work with is important also - make things happen together! Your friends and your communities are your greatest resources.” [caption id="attachment_37468" align="alignnone" width="1024"] Haida Gwaii, British Columbia.[/caption]

Mastering the Future

Sevrenne pressed that, “it is essential to pay attention to the social part of the environment. Humans are part of the environment too. We do [many] things that impact nature, and nature impacts us in turn – we’re inextricably linked.” With inter-connectivity in mind, she is looking to continue to pursue interdisciplinary studies, learning about social and natural sciences. We are confident that Sevrenne will remain a strong advocate for the well-being of young people and reinforce the importance of their roles as leaders in the environmental movement and beyond, as is she.

Nature Canada would like to thank the Women for Nature members for generously supporting this mentorship pilot.


Women’s leadership: A Conversation with Janet Bax
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Women’s leadership: A Conversation with Janet Bax

[caption id="attachment_36747" align="alignleft" width="150"] Sharolyn Mathieu Vettese, a Women for Nature Member.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_36759" align="alignright" width="150"] Janet Bax, a Women for Nature member and mentor.[/caption] Featuring Women for Nature member’s Janet Bax. Written by fellow Women for Nature member Sharolyn Mathieu Vettese.  Sharolyn: You have had a long illustrious career in both government and academia.  From what you’ve seen, do they work together or in tandem when it comes to protecting the environment? Janet: Academia and government have very different roles to play, but they’re equally important.  One of government’s primary roles is to develop programs and policies that work to create that economic well-being in the interest of the people. Academia advances the science and knowledge.  When I think of my career in government, we called on scientists to give us the underpinning for policies.  Working with home grown scientists, there was always a collaborative spirit. I started in policy development in the Progressive Conservative government of Ontario with Premier Bill Davis in the financial area, then moved federally to foreign affairs, and then worked under the Progressive Conservative government under Prime Minister Brian Mulroney to advance Canada’s position as part of an international climate change agreement.  In those days, Environment Canada was really strong.  We were working on a Canadian position which had to include both the positions of Canada’s natural resource NGOs and Department and also that of Environment Canada that was fighting for climate change policies.  It was very fractious; however, at Geneva, we had a consolidated Canadian position.  That was when the international model for cap and trade was discussed and developed. S: What do you mean that Environment Canada was really strong? J: It started under Brian Mulroney, and continued under Prime Minister Chretien when we had two very strong cabinet ministers working on climate change, and they were both women! They were Sheila Copps who was at the same time Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of the Environment, and Anne McLennan who was Minister of Natural Resources. S: It is important to note these capable women were given the chance by a strong leader, Jean Chretien, and they did not disappoint. Up to then, few women were given a chance, but were set up for failure. J: Yes. These women were pioneers. I also worked with Elizabeth Dowdeswell, the current Lieutenant Governor of Ontario.  She is also passionate about the work in which she is involved. S: How do you define a strong woman? J: Interesting question. I think you want and need models.  Liz reminds me that when we both worked at the provincial level and went to federal provincial meetings, we were the only women there.  We were there to do a job.  We stuck together.  The women were not strident, contrary to the John Crosby thing.  Liz has always wanted to do a good job.  For instance, when she was the Canadian representative to the UN Environmental Program in Nairobi, she wanted to make changes, and she did. S: Why do you think there weren’t, and aren’t more women in a leadership role? J: One of the first assessments I undertook when I joined the Council of Canadian Academies looked at the factors that influence the career trajectory of women in research and explored why there are not more women at the top in academia. It found there are all kinds of factors that can explain why there aren’t more women in positions of leadership – things like the timing of childbearing years and career choices, but more importantly, women don’t have the same kind of networks as men.  Men use their networks to get ahead. They have time to make connections, which they use so well.  Women are busy looking after their home, and kids and if they don’t publish in academia, they perish.  Women are so stretched; they don’t have time to network.  Research showed this impacted their ability to climb the success ladder. S: From your experience, has protection of the environment always been the case or were nature and the environment seen as commodities to be sold? If there was a shift, when did it happen. J: First of all, there were major cross-border events such as the Love Canal in Niagara; and the acid rain agreement involving Canada and the US on our shared Great Lakes. But, there was also the United Nations 1987 Brundtland Commission which coined the term “sustainable development”.  This was the notion that development must meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs, and that the exploitation of natural resources and protection of the environment did not have to involve the deterioration of economic and social development. S: You’ve traveled a lot outside of Canada, what does Nature mean to you? J: I think we Canadians value our environment. I think of Sheila Copps and how she created all the national parks under Prime Minister Chretien. I am so proud of these extraordinary protected lands such as the Gwaii Haanas National Park. I am so happy that for Canada 150 the national parks were free. It was so successful that now they have to limit visitors to some of our most popular national parks such as Banff.  We have been very good at preserving our environments.  Now, we have to do same for water.  When I come back from Europe or Africa, I know how important fresh water is.  Many think the next world war will be a fight for water.  Canada does have fresh water, so we are fortunate. [caption id="attachment_35109" align="alignleft" width="300"] Women for Nature at the Parliamentary Reception in October 2017.[/caption] S: What is the value of being a Woman for Nature? J: It is a wonderful thing to give back, and also saying this is what I stand for.  It defines me. The greatest thing about Women for Nature is that we have a common goal of being interested in Nature, preserving it, and ensuring younger women get involved. It has provided such a wonderful network. S: What do you hope to achieve by being a Woman for Nature? J: I’ve helped set up the mentorship program for young women. Many of them are so talented and simply need more confidence – to feel empowered in their decisions.  Mentorship is having a person with experience at your side to say, why not try it this way.  We’ve only recently launched the program, and hope to see it as a success. S: How would you describe your experience so far at Women for Nature? I love Women for Nature! We have to be involved in nature. Even though you’re giving, you’re getting something back.


Watch the below video of Janet talking about Nature Canada’s amazing Women for Nature and their collective voices!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-v1Ku3ddriU
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Women for Nature: Concrete Solutions for Biodiversity Conservation
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Women for Nature: Concrete Solutions for Biodiversity Conservation

[caption id="attachment_36775" align="alignleft" width="150"] Jaime Clifton-Ross[/caption] This blog post was written by Jaime Clifton and provides the summary of the keys points of discussion during the latest Women for Nature E-Dialogue. Changing the Conversation and Nature Canada’s Women for Nature just led the final e-Dialogue from the Biodiversity Conversations: How important are the common loon and polar bear to Canadians series. Over the last 8 months, over 20 female researchers, practitioners, and civil society leaders explored local to global actions and strategies for biodiversity conservation. Since the series began in September 2017, several critical reports have been published. WWF’s 2017 Living Planet Report for Canada in 2017 disclosed that 50% of species in our country are in decline. The newly published 2018 State of the World’s Birds global study states that 1 in 8 birds are now facing the threat of extinction. Furthermore, the world’s greatest forests could lose more than half of all wildlife by the end of the century, according to another WWF study. Given these alarming trends, the protection of biodiversity has never been more imperative. While there were many great recommendations and ideas, here is a snapshot:

  • Indigenous Collaboration and Leadership: Prioritize collaboration and authentic partnerships between Indigenous systems and western systems at all levels. The newly released ICE (Indigenous Circle of Experts) report speaks to re-inventing institutions to reflect a systems-based approach.
  • We are a part of nature, not apart from nature: Our governance systems are profoundly linear and fragmented, and reflect the dominant belief that nature and culture are separate. Seeing ourselves as a part of nature, not apart from nature, even in our cities, will help (re)connect Canadians to biodiversity and is a critical communications strategy. Also, reposition conservation as an urban initiative and challenge to speak to the growing number of urban dwellers in Canada.
  • Investment and Finance: Greater education about the Aichi Targets for the Canadian public, but more specifically, business and investment leaders should be invited to contribute to enabling the financing and financing tools that will be necessary for Canada to reach its goals.
  • Language and Messaging: Given the overwhelming and negative messaging on biodiversity loss, communicate issues clearly and present them in a positive and personal way. Also, showcase successful efforts and innovations to help spur change at the personal, community, provincial, national and international levels.
  • Mapping: Create/expand an interactive and ongoing map of the critical habitat of endangered and near to endangered species and make these priority areas, as a learning and awareness tool.
Now that the series has come to a close, Women for Nature co-chair, Professor Ann Dale will be drafting an action agenda for Canadian decision-makers summarizing the concrete recommendations for biodiversity conservation in Canada.

Imagine if we design with biodiversity in mind, the possibilities that would open up!

Click here, to view the full conversation transcript.


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