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Ice Shaking Up the Environment
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Ice Shaking Up the Environment

Last week residents in Ontario and Quebec were waken up at night from loud booming sounds. What was the cause of this? Well, you may not believe it but it was from ice! Ice or frost quakes, as they are called, are when crashes occur from the breaking up of ice. These quakes are scientifically known as cryoseisms, and they are caused by water in the ground expanding at cold temperatures. Once the water expands, the ice and ground below cracks and crumbles causing loud noises. Not only are there loud noises, but these ice quakes can even shake the ground. In Ottawa, Nature Canada's staff member Julia Gamble said "At first it felt like snow or ice was cracking and sliding off my roof.  I worried about my new car on the driveway getting damaged.  It happened again and I sort of felt panicked as though someone was on the roof or meteors or parts of a plane were striking it." Another staff member, Ted Cheskey also heard these loud noises from his home. "As I was woken from a sleeping state, I am not sure exactly what I experienced, but my recollections are that there was a loud cracking/rattling noise that sounded like tree branches scraping across the roof" Ted commented. "It was nothing like the popping sounds that the house makes when it adjusts to the colds, but I might even describe it as a sort of “swoosh” sound". Similar noises were also reported in Toronto last January where the temperature dropped suddenly to about -23C overnight. At that time, Dave Phillips, senior climatologist with Environment Canada, indicated that a wet December month coupled with sudden cold temperatures makes it an ideal time for frost quakes.  It was noted in a previous article that he said, “It’s the perfect storm for these ice quakes or frost quakes. It’s sort of like nature yawning and groaning.” He also pointed out added that people are more likely to hear the noises at night as sound carries further. As you can see, ice can surprise us with its capabilities and it important that we study ice. Why? Because ice has the ability to provide us with information on the environment around us. Ice is a large indicator of climate change in various regions, and scientists dedicate their time to studying its movements. By studying the movements of ice, it informs scientists with how the Canadian ecosystem is changing. Would you like to help monitor these changes in our ecosystem? If so, join IceWatch today! This program allows anyone to learn about and record ice in their own neighbourhoods! IceWatch For more information on the previous ice quakes, click here.

Exploring Canada’s Creatures of the Night
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Exploring Canada’s Creatures of the Night

Not all creatures are ones that you can spot during the day. In fact, there are many species you can find at night that are just as fascinating! If you interested in going on, or organizing your own, night nature walk we offer the following tips to improve this experience: Dress Warmly Often times you'll be standing still listening for creature noises or stopping to examine an animal you've come across. Don't underestimate the drop in temperature during the night. [caption id="attachment_37787" align="alignright" width="305"]Image of a Boreal Owl Photo of a Boreal Owl[/caption] Bring Flashlights, but use them sparingly Flashlights will not harm nocturnal creatures, but they will scare them off. It's often best to let your eyes adjust to the natural light reflected by the moon than it is to use battery powered lights. Bring a recorded owl call Recorded owl calls are a great way to induce a barn or screech owl to return a call, but use them sparingly as owls will assume a potential rival is infringing on their territory and you don't want to disturb them too much! Also remember to start with the calls of the smallest owl first (such as a saw whet owl) and work your way up to the larger owls (such as a great grey owl) as even small owls will be intimated by the presumed presence of the large owls and will fall silent. Be as quiet as you can In the dark, listening to creatures can be as important (and rewarding) as seeing them with your eyes. Naturalists are just as happy to hear an owl as they are to see one. However, you do stand a greater chance of seeing animals if you're not making a lot of noise. Have people look in different directions Organize your group so that your eyes cover as much of the surrounding area as possible. A sighting is a sighting whether it's done by you or someone else! Know the trails before heading out The last thing you want is to be lost out on the trails in the middle of night. Make sure you have prior knowledge of the pathways and always know how to get back to the entrance. Bring a map, if possible, and ensure you have some a cellphone in case of an emergency.


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In 2014, Nature Canada did our own night walk to look for nocturnal creatures. We began our walk along the dark trail guided only by the beams of light provided by our head lamps and flashlights. The low, constant hum of crickets could immediately be heard from the brush lining the path and was occasionally punctuated by the chirp of birds that had bedded down for the night. We approached our first bait station, located near the trail entrance, to see what creatures our fermented brew had attracted. By day, Ottawa's Mud Lake is host to a wide variety of active creatures from snapping turtles, to blue heron and all manner of insects, but by night, the wooded areas surrounding the lake transform and -- if you're lucky or have a particularly attuned set of eyes – a very different set of creatures can be seen. Mud Lake is also the site of Ottawa's NatureHood program. On this evening, a group of visitors had gathered at Ottawa's Mud Lake to explore the often overlooked biodiversity of the area at night. Spotting nocturnal animals is a fun activity, but it's also an important one if we are to know the makeup of Canada's biodiversity. We spotted a rabbit stopped to observe our group at one point, its eyes glowing eerily from the reflected light of our camera flashes. At our second bait station we encountered not moths, but a group of white banded ants that our sweet potion had attracted. The ants quickly scurried away from the gaze of our lights, but we were able to get a close look at a black spider that had set up a web between two bushes nearby. As we made our way to the final bait stations, we stopped to look out on the lake. A muskrat bobbed up and down in the dark water as it made its way to the far shore. At the final station we found that our bait had attracted a moth! It stayed still long enough on the tree for us to identify it as a sharp-winged shade. Based on what we know about moths (and our own limited success at spotting them at the Mud Lake nature walk) in the fall season, moths become more difficult to see due to falling temperatures. However, there are plenty of other nocturnal creatures that can be seen year-round in the Canadian environment. Chris Earley is an Interpretive biologist at the Guelph Arboretum at the University of Guelph, where he's been leading night time nature walks for close to 20 years. He says that many of Canada's nocturnal creatures can still be seen when the temperature drops including: great horned owls, barn owls, flying squirrels, rabbits, coyotes and other small mammals. “Nature walks are actually a great winter activity,” Earley said. “The freshly fallen snow makes it a very pretty environment to go owl watching.” Earley leads evening nature sightseeing events and workshops called Owl Prowls in which a group of visitors learn about the creatures before heading out into a wooded area at the arboretum to attempt to spot or hear the owls using territorial calls. Earley says going out and exploring Canada's nocturnal creatures can lead to some interesting nature stories and sightings. Thank you to our guest blogger Dylan Copland for this post and photos. Dylan is a journalist and media specialist living in Ottawa, Ontario. He is currently volunteering with Nature Canada where he is writing about animals, nature and the people who love them. And thank you to Alex MacDonald with Nature Canada, Chris Earley with the University of Guelph and Casey Whiterock with the Stanley Park Ecological Society for providing information for this article.

Foresters volunteers join Nature Canada’s BioBlitz
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Foresters volunteers join Nature Canada’s BioBlitz

Nature Canada wants to thank the wonderful volunteers at Foresters for joining us at the Fall BioBlitz. Foresters insurance company partners with charitable organizations to support families and communities through volunteering events. The Fall BioBlitz was one such event. 15 volunteers joined Nature Canada at the Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake to build bird and bat houses. In total 24 bird houses and 12 bat houses were constructed and donated to Nature Canada. We will work with communities to place the bird and bat houses in critical spots around the city to support healthy urban wildlife populations. Thank you Foresters volunteers! [caption id="attachment_16901" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of family building a bird house Building bird houses at the BioBlitz[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16900" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of people building a bat house Building a bat house at the BioBlitz[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16902" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of volunteers with complete bird and bat housees Foresters volunteers with the completed bird and bat houses at the BioBlitz[/caption] Photography by Susanne Ure.

Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014
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Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014

Thanks to everyone who came out to take part in the adventure and help us identify local wildlife at Nature Canada’s Fall BioBlitz. Over 150 citizens of the national capital region accompanied local expert naturalists on guided walks where they learned to identify plants, birds, amphibians, reptiles and more! [caption id="attachment_16892" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of birders Birding early in the morning at the BioBlitz. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] The BioBlitz brought out experts and amateur enthusiasts alike on one of the first brisk weekends of the fall to Mud Lake conservation area. Mud Lake is considered by many to be a wilderness gem in the heart of our busy city and is found within the Lac Deschênes- Ottawa River Important Bird Area. It was the perfect location for such an inventory. Easy to get to and containing various habitats in a confined area, Mud Lake is an ideal spot to connect to your NatureHood. A BioBlitz take many forms, but is generally an intense 24 hour survey of a location with a mission to identify as many living things as possible at the site. This event is part of a larger effort to learn more about the state of local biodiversity and catalogue changes over time in population patterns. It is also a great opportunity to connect urban citizens to nearby nature right in the city. [caption id="attachment_16893" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of moss Examining the aptly named fern moss. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Each walk focused on a particular group of plants or animals. An ultraviolet light focused on a white sheet called-in night-flying insects for close examination after the sun had set. Birders, expert and aspiring, rose early to search out common and rare species. We even got an up close look at snapping turtle hatchlings that were making their way from the nest to the water. Not event rain could dampen the enthusiasm of those on the Saturday afternoon plant and reptile walks. The final species list included species listed as at risk in Ontario and federally including the snapping turtle and the butternut tree. All in all it was a very exciting 24 hours! We would like to thank everyone who came out to help us survey the area, in particular all the fantastic local naturalists who shared their expertise and helped to make the day such a resounding success! [caption id="attachment_16894" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of young snapping turtle. Snapping turtle hatchling. Photography by Sarah Kirkpatrick-Wahl[/caption] We hope you can join us for the next BioBlitz in the spring. Check out more photos from the event, learn more about how Foresters volunteers worked to help Nature Canada at the BioBlitz and read the full list of species identified over the 24hour period (coming soon).

Giving Our Planet One Day Off a Year
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Giving Our Planet One Day Off a Year

Mark your calendars! Did you know September 21st is Zero Emissions Days? This event aims towards giving our planet a break and reducing the use of fossil fuels in our everyday lives. What do this day entail? Here are some fun facts and ways to participate:

  1. This day was specifically chosen because the length of days and nights are equal!
  2. It is the same day as International Day of Peace and World Gratitude Day
  3. The Goal: Have minimal use of gas, oil, coal, or electricity generated by fossil fuels
  4. One way to do this is to eat food that does not require the use of energy to make, or prepare your food a day early
Join the fun and make a difference in the environment! Click here for Zero Emissions Day website. For more facts on this day, click here.

Photo Blog: Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014
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Photo Blog: Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014

This past weekend Nature Canada hosted a Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake Conservation Area in Ottawa, ON. Over 150 local citizens came out to explore the area and learn the secrets of identifying birds, plants, insects, reptiles and more! Everyone had a great time enjoying the beautiful area and the brisk weather. Here are some photos from the event. [caption id="attachment_16768" align="aligncenter" width="945"]Participants in the birding walk got up with the sun to catch a glimpse of migrating birds at their most active time of the day. Many birds are never seen through the foliage, so expert birders rely on unique calls and even flight patterns to identify secretive birds. Participants in the birding walk got up with the sun to catch a glimpse of migrating birds at their most active time of the day. Many birds are never seen through the foliage, so expert birders rely on unique calls and even flight patterns to identify secretive birds. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16769" align="aligncenter" width="945"]chichadee This curious Black-capped Chickadee watched the birders right back! Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16784" align="aligncenter" width="948"]Photo of fall warbler This young Black-throated Green Warbler is on its first migration journey from the Boreal Forest to South America. Many warbles migrate at night using the stars to navigate. Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16770" align="aligncenter" width="945"]image of seed pods on a milkweed plant Seed pods on a milkweed plant. Milkweed has a contentious history and has been actively eradicated as it is listed as a noxious weed. Recently however, the public has come to understand the important role that milkweed plays in the Monarch butterfly life cycle and milkweed is beginning to flourish again. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16786" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of expert examining tree bark Jennifer is using a small hand held magnifying glass to examine the lichen on tree bark. Don't be afraid to look at the world from a new perspective. You might be surprised at the beautiful details that are easily overlooked. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16788" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of examining moss Moss is a complex group full of variety. This aptly named Wiry Fern Moss resembles tiny ferns. Mosses do not have typical root structures and thus rely on their leaves to absorb water and nutrients. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16790" align="aligncenter" width="950"]photo of snapping turtle hatchling Snapping turtles, a species listed as special concern in Ontario and Federally, nest at Mud Lake. We were lucky enough to see a few of the young hatchlings making their way from the nest site to the water at the BioBlitz. Unfortunately this little guy and a couple of his siblings were too small to make it over the curb to get off the road, so we gave them a hand by transporting them to a safe place with an umbrella. Photography by Sarah Kirkpatrick-Wahl[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16793" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of expert examining plants. Even the rain did not dampen our enthusiasm. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Thanks to our wonderful experts for making this event possible. You can read full details of the event and see the complete list of species identified at the BioBlitz (coming soon).

Nature Canada to host community fall BioBlitz in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area
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Nature Canada to host community fall BioBlitz in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area

OTTAWA (September 10, 2014) ― Nature Canada and naturalist experts from across the National Capital Region are gathering this weekend to host a fall “BioBlitz” in Ottawa’s Mud Lake area near Britannia Park. The event is open to the general public and is part of a larger effort to learn more about the state of local biodiversity and catalogue changes over time in population patterns. The event runs over a 24 hour period from 3pm on Friday to 3pm on Saturday and includes guided tours for the general public focussing on how to identify groups such as plants, birds, amphibians and reptiles. “Our goal is to involve the general public in the scientific process and to have fun while doing it,” said Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas. MacDonald continued, “our hope is that lots of people join us for a fun, engaging day at this unique urban wilderness site”. MacDonald and other Ottawa-area naturalist experts are aiming to locate, identify and photograph as many different species as possible around the site in a 24 hour period. For more information including a full schedule of events and directions to the site, members of the general public are encouraged to visit: http://naturecanada.ca/news/blog/nature-canadas-fall-bioblitz-at-mud-lake/

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[one_half][separator headline="h2" title="Media Contacts:"] Paul Jorgenson, Senior Communications Manager 613-562-3447 ext 248 | pjorgenson@naturecanada.ca Sarah Kirkpatrick-Wahl, Conservation Coordinator 613-562-3447 ext 252 | skirkpatrick-wahl@naturecanada.ca Monica Tanaka, Communications Coordinator 613-562-3447 ext 241 | mtanaka@naturecanada.ca [/one_half] [one_half_last][separator headline="h2" title="About Nature Canada"] Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Over the past 75 years, we’ve helped protect over 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and the countless species that depend on this habitat. Today, we represent a network of over 45,000 members & supporters and more than 350 nature organizations in every province across Canada.[/one_half_last]

Seven Nature Exhibits to see this Summer!
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Seven Nature Exhibits to see this Summer!

The lazy summer months are a great time to travel to your local museum of natural history. In fact, many of Canada's museums have special programming going on right now! We've assembled a list of seven of the coolest nature exhibits taking place at museums across Canada this season. [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: The Wild Horses of Sable Island"]Where is it?: The Nova Scotia Museum of Natural History, Halifax, Nova Scotia. The once treacherous Sable Island, located off the coast of Nova Scotia, has been the site of over 475 shipwrecks since the early seventeenth century. Never settled by humans, today, the area hosts a population of around 300 feral horses who are the only terrestrial mammals living on the land. Roberto Dutesco's 20 years of photographs of the horses of Sable Island form the basis of this exhibit at Nova Scotia's Museum of Natural History. The gallery hopes to shed light on the mysterious island and its beautiful equestrian inhabitants. This exhibit runs from June 6 – October 13 [caption id="attachment_14718" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Roberto Dutesco Roberto Dutesco photographs of the horses of Sable Island[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Creatures of Light Nature's Bioluminescence"] Where is it?: Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario. The Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, Ontario is currently featuring its Creatures of Light exhibit focusing on organisms that glow through bioluminescent chemical processes. The exhibit features live flashlight fish, who emit light from pouches below their eyes, as well as constructed nature scenes such as: a night time meadow with fireflies; a woodland floor with glowing mushrooms; a cave system with glow worms; and a sparkling sea with microscopic plankton. The exhibit promises to teach patrons how organisms use light to attract mates, lure prey and defend against predators as well as why and how scientists study bioluminescent creatures. This exhibit runs from May 3 – November 9. [caption id="attachment_14720" align="aligncenter" width="300"]jellyfish Illustration of bioluminescent jellyfish from The Canadian Museum of Creatures of Light exhibit[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Nature's Slowpokes"] Where is it?: Montreal Space for Life, Montreal, Quebec If you're looking to take it easy this summer, Montreal's Space for Life is featuring a place to relax and learn about nature's slower creatures. The museum's Nature's Slowpokes exhibit features sloths, tortoises, slugs and other slow moving creatures. You can even chill out in a specially designed space while nature interpreters tell you about the lifestyle of animals that live by the mantra: slow and steady wins the race. This exhibit runs from June 7 – October 26 [caption id="attachment_14721" align="aligncenter" width="300"]sloth Sloth from Nature's Slowpokes Exhibit at Montreal Space for Life[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Backyard Biodiversity"] Where is it?: Beaty Biodiversity Museum, Vancouver, British Columbia The Beaty Biodiversity Museum's current theme of backyard biodiversity is designed to introduce visitors to the local plants and animals of British Columbia through interactive exhibits, scientific information and special programming which looks to both inform and stimulate the public. The museum features many special events based on the local environment such as: backyard biodiversity tours, biodiversity trivia sessions, and naturalist 101 talks designed to teach the public about the natural history of the province and its diverse plant and animal populations. [caption id="attachment_14722" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Beaty Biodiversity Museum Beaty Biodiversity Museum[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Life in Crisis: The Schad Gallery of Biodiversity"] Where is it?: The Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario The Royal Ontario Museum's Life in Crisis exhibition looks to impart three key messages on its visitors: life on earth is interconnected, it is diverse and it is currently at risk. The gallery emphasizes the impact humans are having on the environment by displaying the museum's extensive natural history collection of thousands of organic specimens and through an assortment interactive multimedia exhibits and shows. Visitors can look forward to seeing a living coral reef; “Bull” the southern white rhino; a live leafcutter ant colony and all manner of plant and animal species from around the world. [caption id="attachment_14723" align="aligncenter" width="300"]white rhino “Bull” the southern white rhino on display at the ROM's Life in Crisis exhibit.[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Canadian Wildlife Photography of the Year"] Where is it?: Canadian Museum of Nature, Ottawa, Ontario The winners of the 2013 Canadian Geographic Wildlife Photography of the Year awards are on display at the Canadian Museum of Nature this summer. Museum patrons will see amazing, photographs of mammals, birds, insects and amphibians as well as pictures of Canada's geological landscape and natural rock formations. Some of the award winning shots include subjects of: a Rufous Hummingbird feeding on honeysuckle; a grizzly bear drinking mountain runoff water; a Great Owl hunting for voles; and a 70-meter-tall clay formation standing in a Saskatchewan valley. This exhibit runs from May 16 – September 1 [caption id="attachment_14725" align="aligncenter" width="300"]This photograph of two Halloween pennant dragonflies (Celithemis eponia) was the 2013 winner in the Junior Photographers category. Kyle MacEachern This photograph of two Halloween pennant dragonflies (Celithemis eponia) was the 2013 winner in the Junior Photographers category.
Kyle MacEachern[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Exhibit: Prairie Pollination"] Where is it?: Online at www.prairiepollination.ca and developed by The Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg Manitoba While simultaneously running displays and exhibits for visitors, staff at the Manitoba Museum have been working behind the scenes researching pollination in the Canadian prairies for the past 10 years. And while some of their work can be seen on location at the museum in Winnipeg, many of their specimens are too difficult to display to the general public. Because of this, the museum has created the online exhibition Prairie Pollination to showcase the pollinators that play such a vital part in the Canadian ecosystem. Browsers of their exhibit can expect to see photographs of endangered and common prairie plants alongside their bird and insect pollinators. These are brought to life with watercolour paintings, videos and virtual tours that help provide depth and context to the specimens. [caption id="attachment_14726" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Bob Peterson Photographed by Bob Peterson[/caption]   Thank you to our guest blogger Dylan Copland for this post. Dylan is a journalist and media specialist living in Ottawa, Ontario. He is currently volunteering with Nature Canada where he is writing about animals, nature and the people who love them. You can reach him at dmcopland@gmail.com and find his portfolio on the web at: dylancopland.wordpress.com.

What it’s like to shop at terra20
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What it’s like to shop at terra20

I’ve been working on promoting the Saving for Change partnership between terra20 and Nature Canada for a few weeks now. I finally had a free hour in my day and thought, this is the perfect opportunity to drop in to the store for a visit! In case you haven’t already heard,

Nature Canada members receive discounts on the many nature-friendly products, and 2% of those purchases will go towards supporting our efforts to protect and conserve our environment!

It’s easy, all you have to do is sign up and shop online or in-store! Find out more about Saving for Change here. Since I live so close to the Iris location in Ottawa, I thought a little bit of shopping would be a fun way to spend an hour on a sunny Friday afternoon. What is it like to shop at terra20, you ask? I had a great experience in the store. The moment I walked in, there was Amanda to greet me and explain how the store works. She pointed to the front wall, where there were several large logos. I learned that terra20 has researched the ingredients and production process of each of the products, and have created various logos that inform the shopper about the product. For example, the hand cream I bought contained no harmful chemicals, wasn’t testing on animals, and was made in Canada. I could see all of this simply by looking at the price tag in front of the product. They took all the work out of sustainable shopping! Picture of the terra20 ethical symbols [pullquote align="right"]"It’s important to know where the things we buy come from, who made them and how they were made. To create a brighter future, environmentally friendly products should be standard, not the exception." Read more here.[/pullquote]terra20 had an incredible amount of products, and tons of brands I had never even heard of! I literally spent 20 minutes just walking through the beauty products, and don’t even get me started on the food section! The store was organized by section with the help of giant black signs, and covered everything from baby clothes to home furnishing. As an added help, dispersed throughout the store were several tablets connected to the Internet, just in case you had any inquiries that the already knowledgeable staff couldn’t answer. It really was a great way to spend an hour and to learn about sustainable shopping. Image of the Saving for Change banner

Want to try shopping at terra20?

Join me and sign up for the Saving for Change program or submit a photo to our 75th Anniversary Photo Contest for your chance to win one of two 100$ gift cards! If you have any questions, please contact Nicole at nmiddleton@naturecanada.ca.

World Environment Day 2014
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World Environment Day 2014

Today marks the 42nd year that the world has celebrated World Environment Day! The UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme), the coordinator of WED, organizes several events to encourage us to raise awareness about the environment worldwide. These events include taking the annual challenge, contests, and leading your own clean-up campaign. The main idea is to do something- anything, that makes a positive impact to the earth. Each year, the United Nations comes up with a different theme for this day. This year, the slogan is “Raise your voice, not the sea level” with the theme of small islands and climate change. In honour of WED, here are 10 simple tips from the Nature Canada staff on how to make our environment a better place to live in starting with your NatureHood: [tabgroup style="vertical"] [tab title="Tip 1."]

Commute with your bike more often.
Commute with your bike more often[/tab] [tab title="Tip 2."]
Turn off lights to save electricity and protect migratory birds.
Turn off lights to save electricity and protect migratory birds[/tab] [tab title="Tip 3."]
Make yourself a balcony garden with reusable materials.
Make yourself a balcony garden with reusable materials[/tab] [tab title="Tip 4."]
Keep unwanted pests out by tidying and cleaning your area.
Keep unwanted pests out by tidying and cleaning your area[/tab] [tab title="Tip 5."]
Plant milkweed to protect monarch butterflies.
Plant milkweed to protect monarch butterflies[/tab] [tab title="Tip 6."]
Write to your city councillor and ask him or her put recycling bins next to city garbage cans.
Write to your city councilor to put recycling bins next to city garbage cans[/tab] [tab title="Tip 7."]
Buy products with minimal, recyclable packaging and with the most basic ingredients list.
Buy products with minimal, recyclable packaging and with the most basic ingredients list[/tab] [tab title="Tip 8."]
Plant colourful flowers to attract as much wildlife you can.
Plant colourful flowers to attract as much wildlife possible[/tab] [tab title="Tip 9."]
Stay away from body care products that contain micro-beads as they end up in the great lakes.
Stay away from body care products that have micro beads [/tab] [tab title="Tip 10."]
Keep your cat(s) indoors. They kill approx. 200 million birds in Canada each year alone.
[/tab] [/tabgroup]   Throughout the years, Nature Canada has been inspiring thousands of people to find their voice for nature and become involved with the world we live in. We have done so through great initiatives like Bird Conservation and Women for Nature or simply educating the youth with fun presentations and walks. Also, the Nature Photo Contest that just started motivates everyone to go outside and capture the beauty of nature all the while appreciating the simple joys of life. Sometimes, it just takes a small splash of action to add to the ripple of impact. World Environment Day isn't the only day you can show appreciation for the wonderful world we live in, how will you contribute to a better environment for today and tomorrow?
If you liked these tips, check out how you can make your backyard more bird-friendly here or how you can be a good neighbour with this awesome infographic!

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