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Slime for Wildlife
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Slime for Wildlife

[caption id="attachment_37287" align="alignleft" width="150"] Jill Sturdy, NatureHood Program Manager.[/caption]

What do slime and wildlife have in common? Ask the Grade 4 class at St. Anne’s Elementary School in Kanata, ON, who created a project to help wildlife using slime.

As part of the Entrepreneurial Adventure program offered through The Learning Partnerships, the students created their own business as a way to develop enterprising skills, financial literacy, innovative thinking and social responsibility. Through their creativity and dedication, they made and sold slime over a 4-month period, and were successful in raising over $1,800 for Nature Canada! I first met the students at the end of February 2018, where I gave a presentation about Nature Canada, the importance of spending time in nature, and what they can do to help wildlife. A few months later their teacher, Mme. Cacciotti contacted me asking if I could come back for the student’s presentation about their project. I was so impressed by their commitment to wildlife and incredible success, I contacted the local City Councillor, Allan Hubley and asked if he would also attend the presentation.
[caption id="attachment_37282" align="alignright" width="370"] Jill Sturdy presenting a Certificate of Appreciation to Grade 4 student Carter.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_37281" align="alignleft" width="367"] 1. L-R: Grade 4 Teacher Sarah Cacciotti, Principal Chantel Couture-Campbell, Jill Sturdy, & City of Ottawa Councillor Allan Hubley, with the class from St Anne Elementary.[/caption]                  
On June 11, a few of the students gave a presentation about the project, some of the challenges they faced and how they overcame them, why they chose Nature Canada, and examples of where they sold the slime. Afterwards, I presented them with a Certificate of Appreciation, and Councillor Hubley recognized their efforts as well. It just goes to show, a little determination and commitment goes a long way. Here is what the students had to say:
“At first, I was a bit reluctant to go along with Nature Canada. But then I realized, by helping other species, we were really helping ourselves, and the world! This world belongs to all of us, and like it or not, we're here with everyone else. So we did our part, for the animals, for the people, for the world! And that's the greatest achievement of all.” - Finn Roy “I chose Nature Canada because I imagined all of the little animal faces dying in their destructed habitat. I knew I had to do something. So we chose Nature Canada to help our feathery, scaly and furry friends.” -Alexia Janeczek

Thank you St. Anne Elementary for choosing to support wildlife and Nature Canada!


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Endangered species stand a chance of recovering with young nature lovers on their side
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