Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada
Birds of a Feather Disappear Together
courtesy of Pixabay
News

Birds of a Feather Disappear Together

You remember the path in front of you being sunny, with no shade to hide the golden beams of light bathing the grass of the prairie. The birdsong in the brush around you beckoned you forward, begging you to explore every inch of the sprawling grasslands. Sounds of life could be heard for miles in every direction. Now however, it seems different, something feels off. As you stand here on the packed earth, all that you hear is the sound of wind through crop leaves. You wonder how a place that once felt so full of life could feel so empty. 

The birds, you realize, are gone.
They are not coming back.
Canadians are heading toward this reality at an alarming rate, but we can stop it from happening if we work together. The North American Bird Conservation Initiative (NABCI) in Canada, of which Nature Canada is a part of, recently released the second State of Canada’s Birds report. In this report, we demonstrated how the populations of Canadian bird groups have changed since 1970, and, while some species are recovering, for many classes of birds it is not looking good. [caption id="attachment_50529" align="aligncenter" width="414"] A Barn Swallow perching; this species of swallow is threatened.[/caption] The State of Canada’s Birds is a timely and useful report that serves as a call to action to address the extinction crisis that our bird populations are confirming. Grassland birds, aerial insectivores and shorebirds continue to decline fastest. Fortunately, the report also contains many steps we can take to improve the chances for these bird populations. Nature Canada’s work focuses on doubling protected areas, supporting Indigenous-led conservation of shorebirds and working with farmers to save declining swallows to help the species most in need. Not all of the news is bleak however: over the same period (since 1970), other species have benefited from investments in conservation. Geese have increased by 360 percent, ducks by 150 percent and birds of prey by 110 percent thanks to the ban on DDT in the 1970s.  

This is proof that, when we take action together, conservation works.

 

Much of this report may sound similar to the seminal State of Canada’s Birds report from 2012 in its overall message, but this report is different in many ways. While it does not include a region by region analysis of population trends and indicators as the 2012 report did, it does include an overall (pan-Canadian) analysis of seven major groups of birds that, for the most part, represent our major biomes.

There is also more detail in the trend analysis, including a Twitter graphic which shows the number of individual species within each major group of birds that are increasing, stable, declining or lacking adequate information. For example, while the 137 forest bird species analyzed increased by 6 percent since 1970 overall, 43 of the species in the group suffered population declines. This includes all of the species that are forest crop specialists like the Evening Grosbeak, with a 39 percent decline.  The populations of forest species that winter in South America also dropped by a significant 31 percent.

This information was not a part of the 2012 report, which would have left us with the impression that all forest birds are doing well. Therefore, this 2019 Report provides an important level of detail that will help focus conservation efforts where they are most needed.

 

How You Can Help:

Sign the Petition: Nature Canada is working to create more protected areas in Canada to save our birds, aquatic animals and other endangered wildlife. Sign our petition to create real change and have your voice heard by our government when it matters most Do Not Disturb: Shorebirds are losing their valuable stopover sites (resting points) due to modern developments. If you see them resting on the beach, keep your pets and children from chasing them away-they have a lot of flying ahead of them. Keep Cats Safe and Save Bird Lives: Along with our partners, Nature Canada has made significant progress on this issue through our campaign and coalition to keep cats safe and save bird lives. Explore safe outdoor options for your cat at catsandbirds.ca  Vote with Your Fork: Buy your food from local, sustainably-run farms, and choose products like bird-friendly (shade grown) coffee, range-fed beef and sustainably-sourced seafood. Reduce Waste: Bring glass jars and buy food in bulk, use reusable cups for your morning (bird-friendly) coffee and avoid single-use plastics wherever possible Make Your Windows Visible: Millions of birds die every year due to window collisions. Often, only one or two windows are responsible for the majority of collisions, therefore you can focus on the problem windows rather than all of them. Learn how to do this here.  Reduce Your Carbon Footprint: Choose to bike, walk or jog as much as you can. If you have to go somewhere farther, take public transportation or carpool to reduce fuel consumption.   View the NABCI in Canada Report Here: www.stateofcanadasbirds.org Le Rapport est Disponible en Français Ici: www.etatdesoiseauxcanada.org   Read More in Recent Articles: https://toronto.citynews.ca/2019/06/20/report-finds-many-birds-in-decline-but-co-operation-works-to-rebuild-populations/

Five days in the field on Rupert Bay, one to go
News

Five days in the field on Rupert Bay, one to go

Report from the field by Ted Cheskey Planning travel on Rupert Bay is a gamble.   Its broad reach, oriented to the northwest, from where blow the prevailing winds, mean its shallow waters can easily be whipped into a frenzy.   The team of myself, Aurelie Bourbeau-Lemieux, a biologist working for the Cree Nation Government, Gary Salt, a local resident familiar with the capricious Rupert, participant in our March workshop on bird identification, and representing the Cree Nation of Waskaganish and the local Trappers Association, and Marc Antoine Montpetit, an expert birder and atlasser, volunteering on behalf of the Breeding Bird Atlas project of Quebec, were ready to go on Monday morning, but weather and various delays meant we were stuck in the community until Wednesday.   One plus about the delays was that we were able to present our project and talk about birds to a group of 15 local youth taking a course on the environment, and recruit three from the group to join us in a few hours for our final trip (just for the day) to a few places we could not get to yet. Our work is being funded by Environment Canada's Aboriginal Fund for Species At Risk, and our focal species are the Red Knot, Hudsonian Godwit (not yet on the list), Yellow Rail, Common Nighthawk, Short-eared Owl, and Olive-sided Flycatcher.    Marc Antoine is focussing his efforts on breeding birds, gathering evidence of breeding of all of the species we observe, and targetting a few specialties for the area, including Little Gull and LeConte's Sparrow .  Over five days we visited five different locations, being transported to each by boat from two different camps.  Families have hunting camps around the bay, and we have been able to arrange accomodation with the camp owners, as they are used infrequently this time of year.    It rained every day, some days more than others, and the biting insects would be severe for the faint of heart.  Some of our days involved trudging over 10 kilometres through boot sucking mud, waist high soaked vegetation with no terra firma, and tricky passages concealled benath the vegetation, that were riddled with a minefield of bottomless pools of muck that could be trip-enders.  It wasn't all like that.  Some areas where realatively dry (truly a relative concept here), and there even are stretches of sandy beach in places between the mud flats and the limits of the boreal forest.  But, working on these surveys is very physically demanding, and one must not be easily discouraged by challenging conditions.  I certainly admire the great work that has been done on the Ontario side of James Bay by CWS, MNR, ROM, Moose Cree, BSC, OFO, more many years. The birds have been pretty impressive.  We have been able to sample most of the habitats that we had targetting, though not all.   Some highlights from the first day were seeing several Little Gulls, a species that is rare in North America, but which seems to be breeding locally here.  Though we did not find a colony, we did observe a few adults and juveniles.   Another breeding bird target was the elusive Yellow Rail, one of the most secretive birds around.  Previous studies by Michel Robert, coordinator of the Atlas of Breeding Birds of Quebec, suggested that this bird is abundant in one particular part of the Bay called "Cabbage Willows".   The rail makes a sound like clicking stones together in a 2-3 rhythm mostly.   We were very successful, finding 18 territorial males on transects through their soggy sedge and forb habitat.  We were also successful in finding the two sparrow specialties of the coastal marshes: Nelson's Sparrow and LeConte's sparrow, counting about 200 territorial males of the former and at least 30 of the latter. We have observed several Common Nighthawks in different locations both in Waskaganish and along the coast.  Finally the shorelines of Jacob Island, a small Island at the mouth of Rupert Bay, appears rich in migrating shorebirds, as we identified 15 species in a few hours of surveying three kilometres of shoreline, including over 200 White-rumped Sandpipers, over 100 Hudsonian Godwits, a Marbled Godwit, and 14 of the endangered Red Knots. We are grateful for the Cree Nation of Waskaganish and Environment Canada for supporting this project, which we hope to continue into the future as we build connections in the community and continue to gather evidence in support of eventual Important Bird Area designation. [caption id="attachment_14939" align="alignnone" width="300"]Ted Cheskey, Marc Antoine Montpetit, Gary Salt, Aurelie Bourbeau-Lemieux Ted Cheskey, Marc Antoine Montpetit, Gary Salt, Aurelie Bourbeau-Lemieux[/caption] Aurelie with storm in background by Ted Cheskey Aurelie with storm in background by Ted Cheskey [caption id="attachment_14941" align="alignnone" width="300"]LeConte's Sparrow by Ted Cheskey LeConte's Sparrow by Ted Cheskey[/caption] [caption id="attachment_14943" align="alignnone" width="300"]Cabbage Willows - Yellow Rail habitat Cabbage Willows - Yellow Rail habitat[/caption] [caption id="attachment_14945" align="alignnone" width="300"]the mud flats on Jacob Island, Rupert Bay, by Ted Cheskey The mud flats near Cabbage Willow, Rupert Bay, by Ted Cheskey[/caption] [caption id="attachment_14947" align="alignnone" width="300"]Juvenile LIttle Gull, Rupert Bay by Ted Cheskey Juvenile LIttle Gull, Rupert Bay by Ted Cheskey[/caption]  

Update on Moose Cree – Nature Canada Species at Risk surveys in Moose Cree Homelands
Saw Whet Owl by Ted Cheskey
News

Update on Moose Cree – Nature Canada Species at Risk surveys in Moose Cree Homelands

A few days were spent surveying habitat along the North French River, a pristine and unadulterated watercourse just south of Moose Factory and Moosonee in Moose Cree First Nation Homelands.  Our target was Canada Warbler, a species seemingly at the extreme north edge of its range in Ontario and for which Nature Canada is part of an international initiative that includes Bird Studies Canada, BirdLife International, Swarovski Optik and Canadian Wildlife Service to recover this Threatened Species.  We (myself and my two Moose Cree colleagues Bernie and Josh) were successful, as my blurry image demonstrates, in the extreme conditions of biting insects, heat, uneven terrai,n and flitting warblers.   We also were treated to two  more Olive-sided Flycatchers in the same area, and our favourite, the most friendly Saw Whet Owl I have ever met! [video type="youtube" id="59Q04CDhnTE"]     [one_third] [caption id="attachment_13276" align="alignnone" width="300"]Bernie and Josh in the boreal Bernie and Josh in the moss of the Boreal Forest by Ted Cheskey[/caption] [/one_third][one_third] [caption id="attachment_13275" align="alignnone" width="300"]Canada Warbler Canada Warbler male shows itself along North French River just south of Moose Factory Photo by Ted Cheskey[/caption] [/one_third][one_third_last] [caption id="attachment_13279" align="alignnone" width="300"]Saw Whet Owl Saw Whet Owl by Ted Cheskey[/caption] [/one_third_last]

Honouring Grand Chief Stan Louttit
News

Honouring Grand Chief Stan Louttit

In 2011, I travelled to the Cree community of Weenusk on the Winisk River, not far from the Hudson Bay coast.  I was invited to address the Chiefs of the Mushkegowuk Council, during one of their meetings by Grand Chief Stan Louttit.  My presentation was about Important Bird Areas.   Grand Chief Louttit made me feel confortable and at ease for my short presentation, and offered me advice, in his special humous way, that has proven very important in developing our collaborations with the Cree.    A year or two later, I was visiting Moose Factory and dropped in to his office.  Again he welcomed me warmly, and went out of his way to help me with my efforts to work with the council on the topic of bird conservation and Important Bird Areas.   He supported our efforts, but also understood that to gain community support, I would have to understand the community values, including that the birds that interested most community members are the ones that are eaten - geese, ducks and grouse primarily.   That was my personal experience with the Grand Chief.  I am honoured to have had these experiences with him.   I also know that his efforts to defend and advance the rights of his people and support the many First Nations within the Mushkegowuk Council were impressive and very important. I wish to express our deepest sympathies to his family and people, and acknowledge the great loss that has occurred with his passing.   Ted Cheskey on behalf of Nature Canada  

Nature Canada Linking Communities Together
News

Nature Canada Linking Communities Together

Twenty two dedicated educators from three countries met in Swift Current Saskatchewan for the love of birds, shorebirds to be specific.  They met to share stories and refine their efforts to educate and inspire children and the public to protect the several species of shorebirds that they share, and the habitats on which they depend in their three communities along the central and western flyways.  The species include American Avocet, Piping Plover, Snowy Plover, Marbled Godwit and Wilson ’s Phalarope among others. [one_half] [caption id="attachment_12670" align="alignleft" width="300"]American Avocet American Avocet, Ted Cheskey[/caption] [caption id="attachment_12720" align="alignleft" width="300"]Red Knots Reed Lake Saskatchewan Red Knots on Reed Lake Saskatathewan, Ted Cheskey[/caption] [caption id="attachment_12713" align="alignleft" width="300"] Principal dressed up as bird Principal of Central School in Swift Current dresses up as a bird[/caption] [caption id="attachment_12725" align="alignleft" width="300"]Aurora boreallis, Chaplin Lake Aurora boreallis, Chaplin Lake, Ted Cheskey[/caption]   [caption id="attachment_12749" align="alignnone" width="300"]Ted Cheskey and Mexican Linking Communities Partners Nayarit educators and Ted observing lots of birds[/caption] [/one_half] [one_half_last]The alkaline (salty) wetland habitats in Chaplin, Reed and Old Wives Lakes in Saskatchewan, the Great Salt Lake in Utah, USA, and the Marismas nacionales in Nayarit State of Mexico support very large numbers of these species at different points in their life cycles, in addition to other shorebird species such as the Sanderling and the endangered Red Knot.  Each site carries a badge of honour as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site.  Canada has only seven of these special areas, and the Chaplin area lakes are one of the most important. Bird conservation in Canada requires international partnerships.  Four of every five of “our” bird species migrate outside of our borders each fall, most passing through or over-wintering in the USA, Latin America or the Caribbean.  A full life cycle approach to conservation that addresses species’ needs and threats in each phase of their annual cycles is essential for effective conservation.  Canada’s shorebirds, including sandpipers, plovers and phalaropes, have declined 42% in the last 40 years.  Arctic nesting shorebirds have declined over 60%.  Evidence is pointing to stop-over sites as perhaps holding the key to the fate of many species. “Linking Communities Wetlands and Migratory birds” is a project inspired by a recognition of this ‘full life cycle approach,’ initiated nearly 15 years ago by visionary conservations from each country.  The program has evolved organically, with different partners and supporters coming in over the years.  Rio Tinto Kennecott, who operates a large mine on the end of the Great Salt Lake, has provided project partners with significant support over the past five years. One element of this project that has recurred several times is  an educational exchange during which small groups of educators from the three countries get together to share experiences and collaborate towards educating their communities and protecting their species and habitats.   Often a common project is developed during these gatherings such as producing post cards that incorporate art from children from each country. In addition to education, this project encourages the exchange of knowledge and methods for monitoring bird populations, researching species ecologies, addressing threats, encouraging stewardship and promoting ecotourism through festivals.  Each partner holds a festival to celebrate shorebirds.   Our meeting coincided with Chaplin’s Shorebird festival which is always held at the beginning of June. Nature Canada is honoured to be one of the Canadian partners of Linking Communities, along with Nature Saskatchewan and Chaplin Tourism who run the Chaplin Nature Centre, a must visit for anyone travelling along the TransCanada highway between Moose Jaw and Swift Current, Saskatchewan.  We all tip our hats to the volunteers in Chaplin Tourism who did a tremendous job of welcoming our partners from the south, and making a meaningful and rich meeting over the past few days. One of the highlights for me was being able to share with our Mexican friends one of Canada's most beautiful and mysterious natural phenomena:  the Aurora borealis. [/one_half_last]

“Boreal Birds Need Half” report released today
News

“Boreal Birds Need Half” report released today

As billions of birds are arriving on their Canadian boreal breeding grounds this May and June, international experts are calling for increased protection of Canada's “bird nursery of the north.” A new report by the Boreal Songbird Initiative (BSI), Boreal Birds Need Half, cites science showing that boreal bird species require expansive, landscape-scale habitat conservation in large, interconnected protected areas to maintain healthy populations. Science shows that conserving half (at least 50%) of the boreal forest provides birds the best chance to survive over the long term.  The timing of this Report heralds International Migratory Bird Day (Bird Day) month in North America.  Bird Day is celebrated in hundreds of communities in the Americas by events and activities to engage people in birds, and promoted in Canada by Nature Canada.  Each year Bird Day has a different theme.  “Why Birds Matter” is the theme this year, and the Boreal Birds Need Half Report did not disappoint in this regard, devoting several pages to documenting different ways that boreal birds matter, from pest control to seed dispersal. This Report builds on an earlier Report: Birds at Risk: The Importance of Canada’s Boreal Wetlands and Waterways, authored by Nature Canada, NRDC and BSI about the importance of Canada’s boreal wetlands for birds. “This Report is a timely initiative to refocus attention on the globally importance of Canada’s boreal region as a breeding grounds for birds and the need to keep the boreal as an intact ecosystem by protecting half of it and managing the rest sustainably” said Ted Cheskey, Nature Canada’s manager of bird conservation. “I am pleased that the report emphasized the value of the boreal to Canada’s indigenous peoples. Nature Canada is proud to work directly with and learn from Cree First Nations on southern James Bay. We are very happy to see the Report recognize the requirement of free, prior and informed consent from Canada’s First Peoples as a precondition to the Report recommendations. “We are also glad to see that Canada Warbler used as an example in the Report. Nature Canada is working in partnership with Bird Studies Canada, the Canadian Wildlife Service, and BirdLife International on an exciting project to recover populations of the officially Threatened Canada Warbler.” For more information contact Ted Cheskey at tcheskey@naturecanada.ca or see the report and the resource pages by clicking here. Ted Cheskey Manager of Bird Conservation Programs

If I had a hammer – Ode to Pete Seeger, my hero
News

If I had a hammer – Ode to Pete Seeger, my hero

I was saddened to hear that one of my heros, Pete Seeger, has died at 94.  Humanist, environmentalist, activitist, and brilliant performer and song writer, Pete Seeger is an icon, and an important part of American history, and a shining light on the great things of America.   Key moments that have shaped the USA are woven into Seeger's personna, the labour movement, persecution during McCarthyism, the environmental movement, the anti-Vietnam war movement, the restoration of the Hudson River. . . .   If you've sang, or hummed his song "If I had a hammer" you know a bit about Pete Seeger. When I was teaching outdoor education with the Waterloo Region District School Board, I would use one of Pete's songs occasionally for one of my indoor lessons.   It starts like this: "Well gather round people, and sit yourself down I'll tell you a story of somebody's town It isn't so near, and its not far away It's not a place where I'ld want to stay and the people were scratching, all over the street because the rabbits, had nothing to eat . . . ." The children would be scatching their heads, throughout the song, a true lesson on food chains and ecology, wondering why people were scratching because rabbits had nothing to eat.   The answer came in the last verse. Pete, you certainly inspired me and millions of others I have no doubt.  May your soul rest in peace, and your spirit and songs live on forever! Ted Cheskey, an admirer of Pete Seeger

Appeal of Environmental Tribunal’s Ostrander decision is happening now!
News

Appeal of Environmental Tribunal’s Ostrander decision is happening now!

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment along with the private energy company Gilead Power are having their day in Ontario Divisional Court this week to try and overturn the Ministry's own Environmental Tribunal's Rejection of Gilead's nine turbine wind energy project proposed on the Ostrander Point Crown Land Block on the South Shore of Prince Edward County.  The Toronto Star reported on the first day of hearings, which included a small victory for the Prince Edward County Field Naturalist, when the Ministry and Gilead were refused their request to introduce new evidence.

[caption id="" align="alignnone" width="180"]Image of a volunteer 2011 Nature Canada Voluneer of the year recipient Myrna Wood leads the efforts
to protect Ostrander[/caption]
The project was rejected in a 140 page decision in July, 2013, based primarily on its impact on an isolated population of the Endangered Blanding's Turtle.  The tribunal also gave considerable merit to the impact the project would have on migrating birds and the globally rare alvar (limestone pavement) habitat, but did not recognize these are reasons for rejection.  Ostrander Point is naturally vegetated public land located on the south shore of Prince Edward County, on the Long Point peninsula.  This part of the south shore is a major migratory bird stop-over and and migratory bottleneck, and is within the globally significant Prince Edward County South Shore Important Bird Area (IBA).  The area is a candidate Area of Natural and Scientific Interest of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, and a historic breeding location of the Endangered Henslow's Sparrow. Nature Canada supports the Prince Edward County Field Naturalists in their efforts to defend this extremely important site against industrial development.   Nature Canada also supports wind energy development in Canada as one of many measures to reduce green house gas production, and recognizes that most projects do not harm bird populations.  However, wind energy should not be built at the cost of biodiversity conservation.  The Ostrander project stands out as one of the worst possible locations for a wind energy project.   Important Bird Areas and other critical wildlife habitats should be free of all industrial activities, including wind energy projects.

Bird-building collisions paper identifies Canada Warbler as “disproportionately vulnerable” to mortality caused by building collisions
News

Bird-building collisions paper identifies Canada Warbler as “disproportionately vulnerable” to mortality caused by building collisions

A new paper published in the reputed ornithology journal The Condor on January 2, 2014 by researchers from the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute and the US Fish and Wildlife Service quantifies the impact of buildings on birds as a major cause of bird mortality in the United States of America.    While it has long been suspected that buildings kill large numbers of birds, this is the first study to undertake a rigorous statistical analysis of available data.   The verdict is that buildings in the USA are annually killing between 365 million and 998 million birds, accounting for 2% to 8% of the total bird population in the continental USA.  Buildings are second only to cats on the list of human-caused mortality.   In 2013, Environment Canada published a series of papers on major human causes of bird mortality in Canada, which arrived at the same conclusion. 

Image of a pigeon after hitting glass
Rock Pigeon from window collision, downtown Ottawa, Alex MacDonald
Using data of 92,000 casualties from 23 studies in the USA and Canada, the researchers were able to estimate actual numbers of birds killed by different types of buildings as well as the vulnerability of various species to building collisions.  For their analysis they classified buildings into three groups: high-rise, low-rise, and detached homes.    Low-rise buildings in the USA kill approximately 56% of birds while detached residences account for 44% of the casualties.  High rise towers (over 12 stories) accounted for less than one percent of the total casualties due to the relatively low number of high towers.  However,individual towers can produle extremely high numbers of casualties.   The number of casualties per building per year on average is the inverse, with high rises averaging 24.3, low-rises, 21.7 and detached residences, 2.1.   The victims of collisions with low and high rise towers are almost exclusively migrants, mainly long-distance migrants, whereas there are a mix of migrants and resident birds accounting for the toll from detached residences.  The proximity of bird feeders was associated with increased casualty rates with detached residences (hence the presence of resident birds), whereas light emissions, the proximity of vegetation and amount of glass covering buildings were factors associated with increased mortality from low and high rise building in some studies.
Image of a Canada warbler
Canada Warbler, John Kormendy
Several species of birds of high conservation concern were disproportionately represented on the list of casualties, with Canada Warbler (Threatened in Canada) catching our eyes.  In ranking the probability that the species would be a building casualty compared to the “average” species' probability, Canada warbler ranked sixth (46.7 times the "average" bird) for low rise, and eighth (25.8 X), for high rise buildings.   Other Canadian Species as Risk with increased vulnerability include Golden-winged Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Wood Thrush, and Eastern Whip-poor-will.   Other species with disproportionately high casualty rates that have a high proportion of their population in Canada include Purple Finch, Ovenbird, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Brown Creeper.   The authors did not speculate on whether building collisions is having a population level impact on any species, but they do suggest that it is a serious concern requiring mitigation, particularly for bird species with low or declining populations.  Nature Canada, along with our partners Bird Studies Canada, Environment Canada and BirdLife International, through the generous support of Swarovski Optik are undertaking measures to increase our knowledge of Canada Warbler and reduce threats to its populations.  Through Nature Canada’s Naturehood initiative, we hope to work with home owners, community groups, building operators and owners, and municipalities to mitigate the impact of buildings on Canada Warbler and many other species as much as possible. 
 

Canadian Birds in Brazil
News

Canadian Birds in Brazil

[three_fourth]I have been vacationing with my wife in her country (Brasil|) for the last almost 2 weeks.  We spent a few days in Bahia State in the northeast of this great country, including a few days in Salvador, the oldest colonial city in Brasil, and on nearby island Morro de Sao Paulo.  While on the island, I managed to slip in a few hours of birding, and was very happy to find some "familiar friends" from "my" country Canada.   First were a couple of Semipalmated Plovers on the beach almost in front of our hotel, then later on the exposed mud flats along the mangroves, I spotted a Black-bellied Plover and a few Whimbrels.  More Whimbrels were perched with Common and Sandwich Terns on markers for fishing traps, an odd site indeed.   Here a few pictures of these birds with a special one from Brasil thrown in.[/three_fourth][one_fourth_last] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Image of a Semipalmated Plover Semipalmated Plover[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Whimbrel and Little Blue Heron Whimbrel and Little Blue Heron[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Black-bellied Plover and Snowy Egrets Black-bellied Plover and Snowy Egrets[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Scarlet Ibis arrives! Scarlet Ibis arrives![/caption] [/one_fourth_last]

Want to Help?

Canada’s wilderness is the world’s envy. It’s our duty to keep our true north strong and green.

Donate