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The Fundamentals for Winter Camping in Canada
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The Fundamentals for Winter Camping in Canada

[caption id="attachment_30939" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Liam Harrap, Guest Blogger Liam Harrap, Guest Blogger[/caption] This blog is written by guest blogger Liam Harrap. Although the weather is chilly and snowy, don’t let it stop you from exploring a winter wonderland! Sometimes we decide to ski the snowier trail and try something new. Why? As the famous Everest climber George Mallory said, “Because it’s there”. It may be unpleasant, and for some even gosh-darn awful. Nevertheless, winter camping is an experience everyone should have (yes everyone). It’s an alternative way to explore Canada’s backyard during the offseason. You may even like it! Here’s the basic know-how:

  1. Plan, Plan, and Plan some more
While camping in summer requires preparation, there’s far more to consider in the winter. And far more warm gear to carry. Keep track of the weather as -30oC is a completely different experience than -10oC. Blizzards can collapse tents, make you lose your way and wet weather increases chances for hypothermia. Be prepared for the worst. While camping in the Rockies is cold and dry, coastal BC is warmer and wet (making it much harder to dry anything). Pack appropriately. [caption id="attachment_31351" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Image of winter camping Making breakfast after a big freeze can be quite the ordeal. Dad making toast | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] Bring a warm sleeping bag, if it’s going to be -30oC then bring a -30oC bag. Knowing how to make a fire can mean the difference between life and death. You can use a fire for cooking and drying equipment. Beforehand, make sure the area your camping in allows fires. [caption id="attachment_31350" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Image of winter camping fire Fire always improves the mood. And keeps the chill of Old Man Winter away | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption]
  1. Safety
Tell someone where you’re going and a return time. If you haven’t returned by then, your buddy should contact the authorities. Read a route description beforehand and bring a GPS, map and compass. Make sure you can use all three competently. Darkness descended early and a flashlight is a must. Some locations may require specific equipment, such as an avalanche beacon. Be familiar with avalanche safety training. [caption id="attachment_31349" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Image of The Wapta Icefields in Banff National Park Reading outside is always a treat. The Wapta Icefields in Banff National Park | Photo - David Harrap[/caption]
  1. A Cheery Attitude
Let’s face it – winter is hard. If you expect to hate it, you probably will. In the end, what’s a night of discomfort? Find ways to smile and entertain yourself. At the very least, winter camping makes you appreciate the basics in life. Such as central heating, your breakfast not freezing solid before you’ve finished eating it and not having to sleep in an ice-entombed tent. Can’t afford that holiday to Hawaii? Just go winter camping for a couple nights and when you return your home will seem nice and warm like a tropical beach. [caption id="attachment_31347" align="aligncenter" width="500"]Image of hiker on Mt. Joffre in Kananaskis Country I don't think your view in Hawaii will match the sight from the summit of Mt. Joffre in Kananaskis Country. The climb requires you to camp along the way | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] I won’t lie – winter camping is tough. Yet, like all things difficult, the payoffs, such as the views, can be outstanding. Life is meant for adventuring, and camping is the perfect way to do so. Celebrate Canada’s 150th by pitching your tent in a snowbank. You may even have the entire snowbank to yourself. No reservations required. Guaranteed. Are you sold yet?
Liam Harrap is a master’s student in the Journalism program at Carleton University in Ottawa. He originally comes from Jasper, Alberta. A perfect place for climbing pointy things and survival skiing. He spends many weekends, camping in snowbanks and counting down the days to a buffet.  
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5 Fun Ways to Enjoy Nature on Family Day
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5 Fun Ways to Enjoy Nature on Family Day

[caption id="attachment_33210" align="alignleft" width="160"]Guest blogger Rebecca Kennedy Guest blogger Rebecca Kennedy[/caption] This blog was written by guest blogger Rebecca Kennedy. Today is Family Day in Ontario, Alberta and Saskatchewan, and what better way to enjoy the long winter than partaking in some nature appreciation activities, whether you and your loved ones want to go outside or stay indoors! Look for wildlife wherever you are. Whether you’re in the city or country, animals are still around you during the wintertime. Go for a walk and record the types of animals and insects you see or hear — list them in a notebook or even sketch them. Observe birds and squirrels in your backyard or ducks at a nearby body of water. Set up a feeder on your porch or balcony to get a closer look at the birds in your NatureHood! While outside observing wildlife, check out our e-Book series for identification tips of various types of birds. Stargaze. Bundle up and grab a set of binoculars. One benefit of winter is that the early darkness gives younger children a chance to enjoy this activity. There are weather forecasts specifically for stargazing – for example, Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver, and Moncton. If you live in a city or highly lit area, try heading out to a designated dark sky area or preserve. A map from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada can you help locate a site. There are also several astronomy apps to help you read the sky — Star Chart and Night Sky Lite are both free ones. duck-ice Read together as a family. Cozy up with a thick blanket and mugs of hot cocoa, and read aloud your favourite books. There are many picture books on weather, animals, outdoor environments and other subjects in nature education and appreciation. Vancouver Public Library offers some recommendations to start you off such as Raindrops and Snowflakes and Natural Worlds. Go ice skating. Stay active together this winter! Tie up your skates and bring a thermos of hot chocolate to a nearby park, pond, lake or river. Near Vancouver, skaters can enjoy an 8,000-square-foot pond at Grouse Mountain. In Ottawa, the Rideau Canal Skateway offers up a free and exhilarating way to experience the brisk winter air and get moving during a sometimes dreary time of year. Make a nature-inspired craft. Get creative with found objects from the natural world (or sometimes, Michael’s or Value Village). Our blog offers several ideas, such as a pine cone wreath, a gourd bird feeder and walnut boats. Bring the outdoors inside as well by making a terrarium or a miniature fairy garden. Short on supplies and don’t feel like leaving the house? Use plain white printing paper and scissors to cut out snowflakes to display in your windows or paste on a card. What is your family doing on Family Day? Let us know in the comments below!

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Take them to feel the forest: Winter sensory activities for kids
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Take them to feel the forest: Winter sensory activities for kids

[caption id="" align="alignleft" width="275"]Snowshoeing in Parc de la Gatineau, QC (Photo by DJ) Snowshoeing in Parc de la Gatineau, QC (Photo by DJ)[/caption]

This post originally appeared on the Nature Conservancy of Canada blog page: Land Lines and was written by Caira Clark.

I've walked in the woods all my life, but it wasn't until I took young children with me that I noticed how fascinated they were with the variety of textures found in their surroundings. Kids can spend hours feeling, building, touching and creating with natural materials, such as leaves, twigs, stones and, of course, snow. I’ve seen how young children in particular have a process of discovery that creates a lasting connection to the outdoors. Here are winter sensory activities that can fuel your child’s fascination: 1. Take a mindfulness minute outdoors Go on a nature walk that interests your child. Suggest something special about the place that can only be found if you both wait patiently with your eyes closed. Allow for a short moment of silence and tell them of a feeling you're having, like the breeze on your face. Ask your child if they're having the same feeling. What else can they feel? Talk about all the different sensations that make the place special. 2. Play a counting game See how many different textures and materials you and your child can find around you. If you have more than one child, ask each one to find a different texture, like soft or hard. You can also feel different textures from the same substance, such as soft snow and hard ice. Whatever you choose, you can practice counting the different textures and discover new sensations at the same time. [caption id="" align="alignright" width="275"]Walking through a winter wonderland (Photo by Canadian Voyageurs) Walking through a winter wonderland (Photo by Canadian Voyageurs)[/caption] 3. Make a winter wonderland Try a snowy alternative to “fairy houses" and suggest you build a town made of snow together. It can be for squirrels, elves or whatever else interests your child. Make roads, build houses and incorporate natural materials. How will you make the village comfortable for the squirrels? This is also an opportunity to learn or review the “leave only footprints, take only memories” principle, so use only fallen items. 4. Feed the birds Fill a large bowl or hollow with snow and mix in foods that are suitable for birds, squirrels and other wild animals, such as peanuts, popcorn, bird seed and cranberries. Add other natural materials, such as twigs, rocks, leaves and shells. Allow your child to dig, play and explore inside — the options are endless! If you live somewhere without enough snow, you can freeze the materials in ice instead and play while they melt. When finished, leave the food behind for animals.
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Snowshoeing at Ahmic Lake
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Snowshoeing at Ahmic Lake

[caption id="attachment_30758" align="alignleft" width="150"]Marika Carter Guest blogger, Marika Carter[/caption] This blog was written by guest blogger Marika Carter. I had often wondered about snowshoeing – is it really easier than walking through the snow with boots on?  Why not just hop on a snowmobile? I found the biggest difference is the quietude that you can enjoy in snowshoes. My husband Richard and I gave each other snowshoes for Christmas last year. We were eager for the first snowfall to practice. I can tell you that it was awkward at first, trying to find our balance and taking wider strides than one would normally take.  Once you get going, though, it is, in the words of my late mother, “a whole new world”. We decided to go for a big walkabout on Ahmic Lake, in the “near north” of Ontario.  In January, the lake is very thick with ice and covered with about a foot of snow.  How wonderful it is, to walk on a lake, that a few months before we would have had to swim, canoe or otherwise boat across. We traversed across the sparkling snow, a cloudless azure sky above and the sun with its low angle casting long blue shadows – it really was a different world. [caption id="attachment_31186" align="alignright" width="300"]Image of snowshoeing Deer tracks and resting place on Ahmic Lake. By Marika Carter[/caption] Richard and I came across large paw prints (a wolf? a coyote?) running along the shoreline, following several sharp hoof prints which were surely deer.  Fascinated, we followed the shoreline until we came to a large, flattened depression in the snow.  This must have been where the deer rested earlier in the day!  By now the deer must be foraging in the forest again. Meanwhile, the fragrant cedars along the shoreline bustled with tiny tweets from the various chickadees and nuthatches nestled there.  The more we walked, the warmer we became – good thing we were dressed in layers! Also, bringing beverages and granola bars was a smart idea. We continued to snowshoe and found a small island covered in jack pines that had been twisted in the direction of the prevailing wind. I wondered what creatures might be denned up in the uninhabited island. I pictured a family of wolves curled up nose to tail during a blizzard.  Later, we came upon a large, snow-covered beaver dam.  Again, I imagined the beaver family warm in their mud rooms with a large cache of tender twigs to tide them over until spring. A couple of hours later, we made our way our way back to camp.  Our legs were tired, but our lungs were full of fresh winter air and our souls were fully re-charged with the sights, scents and sounds of nature. Share with us your experience in nature this winter through Facebook or Twitter!

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Why Everyone Should Go Skiing
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Why Everyone Should Go Skiing

[caption id="attachment_30939" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Liam Harrap, Guest Blogger Liam Harrap, Guest Blogger[/caption] This blog is written by guest blogger Liam Harrap. 

Discover the Canada in your backyard on skis

Canada is a big country. Like second-largest-in-the-world big. Like 41-times-larger-than-the-United-Kingdom big. There’s a lot to explore in this country. For some, winter can be an inconvenience for exploring. It’s snowy, cold, and dark. Thankfully, there’s an item that can make winter the best time of the year – skis. [caption id="attachment_30940" align="aligncenter" width="601"]Image of Skiers on Wapta Icefield in Banff National Park Skiing is meant to be spent with friends. These skiers are watching a sunrise on the Wapta Icefield in Banff National Park | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] There are few things that make people as excited as skis. Skis mean adventure, adrenaline, and time spent with friends. Just because you’re going skiing, doesn’t mean you must jump off cliffs or ski steep slopes. You can just hangout on the granny slope and have the time of your life. Skiing can be simple. [caption id="attachment_30941" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Skiers in Banff National Park Learning to ski by the Bow Hut in Banff National Park | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] People always ask whether snowshoes are better than skis. The answer is always skis. Walking is for summertime. Skiing is for winter. Skis can take you to places you never thought possible. Large glaciers, epic mountains, and thick forests. See a view that not even the Queen of England gets to see. Skis are the poor man's limousine. [caption id="attachment_30950" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Image of skier looking into Yoho National Park A bit nicer than the view from Buckingham Palace. Looking into Yoho National Park | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] Ski with the family. Enjoy a day without Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat. Unplug and watch the show provided by nature. Get some exercise – apparently, it’s good for you. Learn about the critters that call the forest home and see their tracks. You may be surprised to find that many species are still around in the cold. Learn about the wildlife that live right outside your front door. [caption id="attachment_30943" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Image of a fly on Freshfields Icefield in Banff National Park A fly on the Freshfields Icefield in Banff National Park | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] Skiing is a perfect way to explore our national parks. Worried about the parks being super busy this summer with the free access? No problem, go in the winter and enjoy the quiet season. You may even have the trails to yourself. [caption id="attachment_30944" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Image of a skier Having some fun on Mt. Nanga Parbat in Banff National Park | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] Of course, there are risks with skiing. If you do want to venture into avalanche country, take an avalanche rescue course, practice your skills, and don’t ski alone. However, you can still go skiing if you don’t have avalanche rescue training. Ski at resorts or on trails that do not travel through risky terrain or stick with cross-country skiing. In the end, all that matters is that you’re outside and exploring. [caption id="attachment_30938" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Image of Mt. Robson Every so often, you inspect the snow with your face. At least Mt. Robson provides a beautiful backdrop | Photo - Liam Harrap[/caption] Want to improve your skiing ability? No problem. Take a lesson, find ski buddies, or join a club. Canada is a winter country, instead of fighting the snow, embrace it. Winter lives here. Happy Skiing!
Liam Harrap is a master’s student in the Journalism program at Carleton University in Ottawa. He originally comes from Jasper, Alberta. A perfect place for climbing pointy things and survival skiing. When a snow day hits Ottawa, he’s the “weirdo” holding up traffic as he skis to school.
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Get Outside and Out-of-the-Ordinary this Winter
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Get Outside and Out-of-the-Ordinary this Winter

[caption id="attachment_23824" align="alignleft" width="150"]Shannon McCabe, Guest Blogger Shannon McCabe,
Guest Blogger[/caption] This blog is written by guest blogger, Shannon McCabe. Saying good-bye to the warm weather doesn’t mean saying good-bye to the outdoors. Getting outside is a great way to celebrate the winter season, get active and connect with nature. Below are some cool and unusual Canadian winter experiences that are worth checking out.

‘Not your average’ skating:

Whether it’s on a frozen pond or your local outdoor hockey rink, skating is the perfect way to enjoy the frosty temperatures while getting your heart rate up. But if you really want to step it up a notch, seek out some skating rinks that get you out of the city boundaries and a little closer to nature. There are fantastic outdoor skating spots all across Canada and we’ve highlighted a few of the coolest ones here. Chateau Lake Louise, Alberta [caption id="attachment_23826" align="alignright" width="300"]Chateau Lake Louise, Photo by: Wilson Hui / CC BY 2.0 Chateau Lake Louise photo by: Wilson Hui / CC BY 2.0[/caption] The skating rink at Chateau Lake Louise, Alberta wins top points for pretty with a majestic halo of Rocky Mountains and a stunning view of the Victoria glacier. Location: Two -hour drive from Calgary.  Price: free to skate, $6 for skate rentals. Lake Windermere Whiteway, British Columbia Located in BC’s Columbia Valley, Whiteway is a 30-kilometer skating track that recently made it into the Guinness Book of World Records for the world’s longest skating trail.  The Purcell Mountains provide a perfect backdrop to the skating trail that loops Lake Windermere. Keep your eyes peeled for elk, mule deer and white-tail deer as they frequent the area for winter refuge. Location: three hours west of Calgary, AB and 16 kilometers from Radium, BC. Price: $5 donation (proceeds go to Toby Creek Nordic Club for skating trail maintenance). Arrowhead Provincial Park, Huntsville, Ontario The 1.3-kilometer skating trail at Arrowhead Provincial Park, Ontario opened three years ago and is garnering a lot of attention for its family-friendly atmosphere and stunning Muskoka scenery. At night, the trail is illuminated by tiki torches.  Check out this video from Muskoka Tourism showcasing the beautiful Arrowhead skating trail. Location: 2.5 hours north of Toronto, ON. Price: $16 per vehicle, $6 for skate rentals.  [caption id="attachment_23828" align="alignleft" width="300"]Winter Yurt Yurting photo by: Travel Nevada / CC BY 2.0[/caption]

Winter ‘Glamping’:

Winter camping is no longer reserved for professional campers and adventurists. Glamourous winter camping (aka Winter ‘Glamping’) is here and offers an awesome way to appreciate the winter without the risk of frostbite. ‘Glamping’ typically involves combining aspects of traditional camping with more creature comforts and amenities. Across Canada there are some pretty cool winter glamping experiences that are definitely worth checking out. “Yurting” in Gatineau Park, Quebec Gatineau Park near Ottawa offers an array of choices when it comes to winter camping from traditional tent sites to more ‘glamorous’ accommodations including four-season tents, yurts and cabins. Gatineau Park is a conservation area and home to a number of species at risk including the eastern wolf, the least bittern and rare eastern red cedars. Location: 15 minutes from downtown Ottawa. Price: $87 to $115 per night. Tent/Cabin Hybrids by ParksCanada ParksCanada has introduced a unique camping experience called oTENTik which combines the outdoorsy feel of a tent and the rustic feel of a cabin. These tent-cabin hybrids are available for rent at National Parks across Canada including Fort Langley Historic Site near Vancouver, BC and Fundy National Park in New Brunswick. [caption id="attachment_23829" align="alignright" width="300"]Tipi Winter Tipi photo by: m.prinke / CC BY 2.0[/caption] Location: multiple locations across Canada. Price: various. Tipi Camping in Wiarton Willie Country What better way to explore the outdoors than to camp out in a traditional tipi. Atelier Arboreal located in Wiarton, Ontario offers the ultimate winter tipi camping experience complete log saunas and beds made of evergreen boughs. Location: Wiarton, Ontario, 2.5 kilometers from Toronto. Price: $339 per couple per night (includes all meals, snowshoes, tipi accommodation and sauna).

Fat Biking:

You can now cycle in snowy, wintry conditions on a specially designed fat bike. As the name suggests, these bikes have wide (fat) tires that are ideal for snow. Due to its increasing popularity, there are now many places offering fat bike trails and rentals. Here are a few to check out: [caption id="attachment_23830" align="alignleft" width="300"]Fat Biking photo by: Trailsource.com / CC BY 2.0 Fat Biking photo by: Trailsource.com / CC BY 2.0[/caption] Horseshoe Resort, Barrie, Ontario – offers 20 kilometers of fat bike trails at the Horseshoe Adventure Park. Location: 1.5 hours north of Toronto. Price: $15 for trail pass, $35 for two-hour fat bike rental. Silver Star Mountain Resort, British Columbia – 15 kilometers of fat biking trails in the beautiful Monashee Mountains of BC’s Okanagan region. Location: 20 kilometers from Vernon, BC Price: $5-$7 for trail pass, and $25 and up for fat bike rental. What is your favorite outdoor winter activity? Be sure to share your activities with us in the comments below!
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Your holiday activity guide for Southern Ontario
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Your holiday activity guide for Southern Ontario

[caption id="attachment_19867" align="alignleft" width="104"]Image of Amy Cross Amy Cross,
Women for Nature Member[/caption] This guest blog is written by a founding member of Women for Nature, Amy Cross who is the Program Manager at The Schad Foundation.  Amy strongly believes in the value nature brings to people’s lives.  Her passion for nature and wildlife is shared with her family and this guides her life mission to protect biodiversity in her own backyard, country and planet. In this blog, Amy shares with our audience the many outdoor and nature based activities that you and your family can experience or explore this holiday season.  Happy holidays while celebrating nature too! I am predict I am not alone in saying my families holiday season if often busy and overscheduled with friends and family visits, the shopping, cooking and eating that often goes along with these gatherings, not to mention decorating, shopping and wrapping gifts and preparing for out of town guests.  Don’t get me wrong the holiday season is my favorite time of year and not only because of all of the things listed above but also the music, sense of community, spirit of giving back and enjoying one of my families favorite change of season… winter! This year I have committed to making my family’s holiday more active, engaging, meaningful and environmental by participating in many of the activities listed below. By all means use these events and activities as reasons to get together with friends and family members… you will not only get to spend quality time together but to also give back, enjoy the outdoors and for some events learn about and/or protect species and the environment! If there is an event we missed please share it in the comments section!

Image of a tit in a bird feederOUTDOOR ACTIVITIES & EVENTS

Christmas Bird Count with Bird Studies Canada, December 14 – January 5, 2015 You can help monitor and conserve North America's birds! To get involved in the Christmas Bird Count, find a count near you and connect with the local contact. You can be a field observer on your own by joining a small group, counting all birds you find. Or you can participate in your own backyard as a Feeder Watchers and count birds at your feeder for a portion of the day. Winterfest on Toronto’s Waterfront, December 18 - December 20, 2015 Families can join Santa and his elves for the 10th Annual Santa Cruise aboard Mariposa Cruises’ Northern Spirit, festive brunch included. Pets can get in on the action with pet photos with Santa at Purina PawsWay, while families can learn more about the Arctic and create their own piece of art at the Museum of Inuit Art. People of all ages can also take part in a FREE pastry-eating contest, hosted by the BeaverTails mascot Beav, and enjoy holiday carols by a cappella group! For more information, click here. Holiday Hike in High Park – December 20, 2015 Meet at the benches by Grenadier Café at 10:30am and enjoy a hike through High Park to Colborne Lodge where you will enjoy hot cider. For more information, click here. Scenic Caves Nordic Adventures Image of snowshoes in snowThis one required a trip to Blue Mountain but activities include groomed cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and traversing 420 feet over Southern Ontario’s longest suspension bridge! This spectacular winter playground at the highest point of the Niagara Escarpment is set in one of Canada’s sixteen UNESCO biosphere reserves.  The suspension bridge features panoramic view of Georgian Bay and the varied, picturesque nature trails range from gentle rolling slopes to steep climbs. Inspired by nature, the trails wind through a 200 year old forest rich with wildlife.  Winter owls and a wide variety of other birds will beckon to you from the 100 foot tall maple, beech and oak trees, while deer and many other animals can be seen in the forest. For more information, click here. Magical Christmas Forest Kortright Centre for Conservation – December 12, 13, 19, 20, 2015 The forest comes to life with lights, friendly elves and your favorite Christmas characters. Visit Santa's workshop to see the elves at work. Play games, make Christmas crafts and watch a Christmas movie in our theater. Enjoy carols and Christmas treats by the fire. Each child will have the chance to visit Santa's cabin and tell Santa their Christmas wish. For tickets and more information, click here. Toronto Zoo Treats and Talks – 11am – 2:30pm December 26, 2015 The Toronto Zoo is the place to be on Boxing Day! Enjoy 50% off admission all day and check out their extensive Keeper Talk Program that offers a fun holiday theme and delightful seasonal treats for the Zoo's animals. Please bring a non-perishable food item for the Daily Bread Food Bank and any old cellphones to help support the Great Ape Conservation program. Plus, if you are looking to warm-up from the cold why not drop by the Zoo's new Indoor Giraffe Exhibit, or one of the Zoo's five indoor and exotic pavilions. For a full schedule and more information, click here.

INDOOR ACTIVITIES & EVENTS

Earth Rangers’ Happy Holi-DIY Mission!Image of Art Supplies Each holiday season we buy new toys, clothing and who can forget the shiny new holiday decorations that make the season bright! Our forests provide us with the resources to make these products (like wood, paper and metals) so it’s important that they are collected in a responsible way. Organizations like the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) make it easy to choose products that help conserve our forests – you can look for their name on the products you buy! This year you can take action to help conserve Canada’s forests and the animals living there by making your own holiday gifts and decorations. Go to their website and sign up to be an official Earth Rangers’ Member, you can then accept the Happy Holi-DIY Mission, you’ll get access to awesome crafts that you can make from items found around your home. When you’re done, visit this site to let everyone know about your Happy Holi-DIY Mission! Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory Flight of White, December 5, 2015 - January 31, 2016 (Closed Dec 21-26, Jan 1) This truly unique holiday exhibit transforms the tropical butterfly conservatory into a magical oasis featuring 1000's of additional Rice Paper butterflies flying freely through the Conservatory. With a wingspan of up to 14cm, the Rice Paper Butterfly, a large white relative of the Monarch, is impossible to miss as it floats through the air moving gently from flower to flower. Rice Paper Butterflies are favorite of guests because they land on people the most! The Flight of White experience also includes lush white poinsettia flowers, 1000's of sparking white lights, and soft strains of classical music playing in the background. Talk about a relaxing escape from the hustle and bustle of holiday activities! For more information, click here. Reptillia Tours and Winter Camp – December 21-24 and December 28 – January 1, 2015 Eastern Ribbonsnake image in leavesReptilia Reptile Zoo is a state of the art 25,000 square foot CAZA accredited facility complete with large exhibits showcasing hundreds of different reptiles and amphibians. This winter Reptilia offers a safe, exciting and unforgettable camp experience for your 4-12 year old. Our campers learn about science, interact with amazing creatures and enjoy all kinds of winter fun at the same time. Repitllia is also open for daily tours everyday but Christmas! For more information, click here. Ripley’s Aquarium – Open 365 days a year! Ripley’s Aquarium showcases the beauty and significance of our aquatic world and the animals within it, to both entertain and inspire while encouraging you to respect and protect the waters of the world. The Aquarium features over 16,000 aquatic animals and North America’s longest underwater viewing tunnel with more than 5.7 million litres of water and over 100 interactive opportunities. Get up close and personal with three touch exhibits featuring horseshoe crabs, sharks, and rays as well as daily dive shows every 2 hours. For tickets and more information, click here. Email Signup

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