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Exemptions from federal environmental review for oil and gas projects unjustified, say environmental groups
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Exemptions from federal environmental review for oil and gas projects unjustified, say environmental groups

Ensuring federal assessment of high-carbon projects is critical if Canada is to step up Paris Agreement ambitions at COP 24.

For Immediate Release – December 6, 2018, OTTAWA – Some of Canada’s largest and most polluting industrial projects may get a free pass on federal review under a new law if the government capitulates to industry demands, warn leading environmental groups. The groups are calling on Canada to expand the list of projects it reviews to ensure that greenhouse gas emissions and other environmental damage from proposed industrial development are minimized. Bill C-69, which includes the Impact Assessment Act, has been subject to intense lobbying in the Senate to weaken or kill the Bill. In recent weeks, the oil and gas and nuclear industries have also begun claiming that their projects – some of Canada’s riskiest – should be exempt altogether from the new law. The Impact Assessment Act mandates the government to weigh the positive and negative impacts of projects that affect the environment, considering factors such as climate change, potential harm to watersheds and endangered species, public safety, and Indigenous rights, in order to minimize harms and boost benefits. The environmental groups have developed a comprehensive list of major projects that should be reviewed under Bill C-69 if Canada is to meet its climate targets. Highlighted project categories include:
  • All projects that propose to emit more than 50,000 tonnes of GHGs per year until 2030, descending to 5,000 tonnes by 2040, including in situ oil sands projects, cement plants, and oil and gas pipelines;
  • All projects requiring permits under the Fisheries Act and Canadian Navigable Waters Act, including hydroelectric dams;
  • Projects located in National Parks, National Wildlife Areas or other federal protected areas, including new roads, ski hills and tourist attractions;
  • Construction or installation of nuclear reactors, including small modular reactors;
  • Projects that impact species at risk and their critical habitat; and
  • Projects that will induce further development, such as roads and transmission lines into relatively undeveloped areas.
How can Minister McKenna claim that Canada is stepping up its ambitions with respect to the Paris Agreement, when her government does not even plan to assess how to reduce pollution from high-carbon projects such as in situ oil sands projects and cement plants?” says Stephen Hazell, Director of Policy and General Counsel at Nature Canada. “The purpose of impact assessment is to look before you leap,” says Anna Johnston, Staff Lawyer at West Coast Environmental Law Association. “In this era of catastrophic climate change and mass extinction, we need to ensure we are making wise decisions that minimize environmental harm and benefit communities. Impact assessment is the right tool to do that, but only if it applies across the board.” -30-
For more information, please contact: Stephen Hazell | Director of Policy & General Counsel, Nature Canada 613-724-1908 (cell) 613-562-3447 ext. 240 (office) shazell@naturecanada.ca Anna Johnston | Staff Lawyer, West Coast Environmental Law Association 604-340-2304 (cell – on Eastern time zone) ajohnston@wcel.org Karine Péloffy | Legal Counsel, Centre québécois du droit de l’environnement 514-746-6597 (cell, available in FR and ENG) k.peloffy@gmail.com Patrick DeRochie | Climate & Energy Program Manager, Environmental Defence 416-576-2701 (cell) pderochie@environmentaldefence.ca Josh Ginsberg | Lawyer, Ecojustice 613-562-5800 ext. 3399 jginsberg@ecojustice.ca
View the recommended entries to the project list. Click here for the PDF version of this press release.

HOUSE OF COMMONS PASSES ENVIRONMENT BILL TO IMPROVE RESOURCE PROJECT REVIEWS AND HELP REGAIN PUBLIC TRUST
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HOUSE OF COMMONS PASSES ENVIRONMENT BILL TO IMPROVE RESOURCE PROJECT REVIEWS AND HELP REGAIN PUBLIC TRUST

Ottawa, ON (June 21, 2018) —Today, the House of Commons passed Bill C-69—including a new law  the Impact Assessment Act—which should greatly improve environmental reviews of development projects as well as regain public trust. “Bill C-69 represents important reforms by emphasizing sustainability and a single-agency approach to assessing resource projects, and by eliminating rules restricting public participation in hearings” says Stephen Hazell, Director of Conservation and General Counsel. “We are satisfied that an appropriate balance has been struck in this legislation and that it will assist in regaining public trust in reviews of natural resource development projects.” “The Senate now has the opportunity to consider Bill C-69, including amendments, as passed by the House of Commons.” said Hazell.  “Nature Canada notes that the current Parliamentary session will end 12 months from now, after which the campaign leading up to the October 2019 federal election will begin in earnest.  We expect that this schedule provides plenty of time for the Senate to complete its deliberations and pass the bill.”


For media commentary please contact:  Stephen Hazell, Director of Conservation and General Counsel 613 724-1908 (cell) 613 562-3447 ext. 240 shazell@naturecanada.ca

Canadians have made their voices clear: There is no place for oil and gas extraction in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
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Canadians have made their voices clear: There is no place for oil and gas extraction in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

OTTAWA (Tuesday, June 19, 2018) — The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, Yukon Chapter (CPAWS Yukon) and Nature Canada together are making sure the U.S. Government knows there is no place for oil and gas extraction in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Today is the final day of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s public scoping period in advance of its environmental review of oil and gas drilling in the Arctic Refuge. More than 12,000 Canadians have submitted comments and signatures to the U.S. Government, urging the cross-border impacts of oil and gas drilling be addressed. Every spring the longest land mammal migration on Earth takes place as the Porcupine caribou herd crosses the Yukon and Northwest Territories to give birth in the Arctic Refuge. The Trump administration’s push for oil and gas extraction would strike the heart of these calving grounds, which could have disastrous impacts on the health of the herd and on the Gwich'in communities that rely on caribou for their culture and livelihood.


Quotes: Dana Tizya-Tramm, Councilor, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation: “From a people that understands resources extremely well by living in the unforgiven environments and climates of the Arctic North, we see the unilateral development of the wellspring of Arctic ecosystems as a significant threat to indigenous peoples, the lands, animals, and our collective futures. It must be known to produce oil and gas from this area can only be done so by manipulating environmental law and trampling human, and indigenous rights.” Brook Brisson, Senior Staff Attorney at Trustees for Alaska: “Protecting the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge is of international importance. The Porcupine caribou herd migrates through Canada to return to the coastal plain in Alaska to calve and replenish themselves each year. Borders do not mean anything to their survival, but habitat and protected ecosystems do. American laws recognize the international importance of the wildlife in this region, and international agreements give Canadians an important voice in this process. We will ensure that the laws and agreements within and between our countries are upheld.” Chris Rider, Executive Director of CPAWS Yukon : “The impacts from oil drilling in the Arctic Refuge would not stop at the U.S. - Canada border. Drilling in the Porcupine caribou herd’s calving grounds could have devastating impacts across Alaska, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories. It's critical that Canadian's stand with the Gwich'in and say no to drilling in the Arctic Refuge.” Graham Saul, Executive Director of Nature Canada: “It is critical we work alongside CPAWS Yukon and the Vuntut Gwitchin to ensure Canadian voices are included in this environmental review. Today’s submission of 12,000 Canadian signatures and comments is an incredible opportunity for Canadians to speak directly to the U.S. government about the serious and irreversible impact oil and gas development would have on one of the last, healthy barren-ground caribou herds on earth. It is Nature Canada’s mission to protect our wildlife areas and countless species that depend on this habitat. We have been doing this for more than 75 years and have helped protect more than 63 million acres of wildlife areas. Arctic Refuge Background The Arctic Refuge is home over 200 species of birds, which migrate to six continents and every state in the United States. The Arctic Refuge provides important habitat for polar bears, grizzly bears, wolves and wolverines. It was established by President Eisenhower in 1960 and expanded by President Carter in 1980. In 2017, a provision included in President Trump’s tax overhaul opened parts of the Refuge’s Coastal Plain to oil and gas development.
High-quality images of the Arctic Refuge available for media use: https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/folders/14m9LLrjivux_uTByUhEDJeatPPnN5g31        For comment please contact: Dana Tizya-Tramm Councilor, Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation (867) 333-4335 (cell) Adil Darvesh CPAWS Yukon 867-393-8080 x 9 adarvesh@cpawsyukon.org Janet Weichel McKenzie Nature Canada (613) 808-4642 (cell) jweichelmckenze@gmail.com
 

Dozens of Events Welcome Birds Back to Canada
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Dozens of Events Welcome Birds Back to Canada

OTTAWA, ON (May 7, 2018) - Dozens of groups from coast to coast are celebrating World Migratory Bird Day this coming Saturday, May 12, with events ranging from bird watching to face painting. Spring is when hundreds of species of birds are on the move, with many returning to Canada from as far away as South America. “We’re thrilled so many groups are participating in this year’s Bird Day,” said Graham Saul, Executive Director of Nature Canada. “Birds go through incredible journeys to be with us, and we owe it to them to step up our conservation efforts so that they can continue to thrive.” A new report from BirdLife International, State of the World’s Birds 2018, reinforces what we already knew - birds are in trouble. Forty percent of the world’s 11,000 bird species are in decline, and one in eight bird species is threatened with global extinction. Threats to birds include habitat loss, climate change, chemical use, window collisions and outdoor domestic cats. Nature Canada and its partners encourage Canadians to take positive actions on behalf of birds, including keeping cats safe from roaming, making their gardens bird-friendly, reducing window and car collisions, and celebrating birds -- on Bird Day and throughout the year. World Migratory Bird Day was created in 1993 and is a project of Environment for the Americas to raise awareness on the need to conserve birds and their habitats. “Birds are a fantastic subject matter to engage people in nature,” says Jody Allair, National Conservation Outreach Manager for Bird Studies Canada. “Participating in a bird-themed event on World Migratory Bird Day is a sure-fire way to become inspired by Canada’s amazing birdlife.” “With the arrival all of these migratory birds happening in May, it seems as though nature is making its claim against the long winter that we just had,” says Jean-Sébastien Guénette, director of Québec Oiseaux. “It is by far the most exciting time of year for ornithologists and nature lovers alike.” Groups across the country have listed their events on a map hosted at www.birdday.ca [journeedesoiseaux.ca]. The World Migratory Bird Day initiative in Canada is a joint project of Nature Canada, Bird Studies Canada and Québec Oiseaux.


For more information contact: Graham Saul at 613-710-2819 Jody Allair at 519-586-3531 ext.117 Jean-Sébastien Guénette at 514-252-3190
ABOUT NATURE CANADA Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and countless species that depend on this habitat. Today, Nature Canada represents a network comprised of over 65,000 members and supporters and more than 350 nature organizations across the country with affiliates in every province. Learn how you can support our nature conservation efforts across Canada
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Budget 2018: Billion-Dollar Breakthrough for Nature Conservation
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Budget 2018: Billion-Dollar Breakthrough for Nature Conservation

Ottawa, ON (February 27, 2018)—Budget 2018 is a billion-dollar breakthrough for nature conservation according to Nature Canada. "This budget is a game-changer,” says Graham Saul, Nature Canada’s Executive Director. “We congratulate Finance Minister Morneau, Prime Minister Trudeau, and Environment Minister McKenna on making these critical investments. We think that Canada's wildlife would also applaud." Budget 2018 commits Canada to investing $1.3 billion over five years to establish new protected areas and to recover endangered and threatened species. "Investing in protected areas is the way of the future for federal, provincial and Indigenous governments, says Stephen Hazell, Nature Canada’s Director of Conservation. “Providing financial support to Indigenous governments such as the Moose Cree First Nation to protect and manage their sacred places such as the North French watershed is the right step forward to reconciliation." "Meeting Canada's international commitment to protect 17 percent of our lands and waters by 2020 will be a challenge. We need this money to make it happen,” says Hazell.  “Nature Canada and provincial and local nature groups are eager to work with governments, local and Indigenous communities, and industry to take full advantage of the opportunities to protect ecologically important places across the country, whether it’s grasslands in Saskatchewan, Carolinian forests in Ontario, Acadian forests in the Maritimes, or wetlands in British Columbia and Quebec." Nature Canada is Canada’s oldest national nature conservation charity, and is a member of the Green Budget Coalition (GBC). The GBC's recommendations for the Budget 2018 can be found here.


For media commentary please contact: Stephen Hazell, Director of Conservation and General Counsel 613 724-1908 (cell) 613 562-3447 ext. 240 shazell@naturecanada.ca To contact a French-speaking spokesperson, call: Ted Cheskey, Senior Manager of Conservation Programs 613 323 3331 (cell) For media assistance please contact: Janet Weichel McKenzie, Nature Canada Media Specialist 613-808-4642 jweichelmckenzie@gmail.com ABOUT NATURE CANADA Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and countless species that depend on this habitat. Today, Nature Canada represents a network comprised of over 65,000 members and supporters and more than 350 nature organizations across the country with affiliates in every province. Learn how you can support our nature conservation efforts across Canada

Nature Canada and Sustainable Forestry Initiative welcomes Director General of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as its 151st member of Women for Nature
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Nature Canada and Sustainable Forestry Initiative welcomes Director General of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as its 151st member of Women for Nature

Ottawa, ON. (September 27, 2017) – Nature Canada, Canada’s oldest national nature conservation charity, is pleased to recognize and honour Ms. Inger Andersen, Director General of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as its 151st member of Women for Nature. Ms. Inger Andersen, is being featured as a keynote speaker at today’s Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) annual conference in Ottawa at the Westin Hotel. SFI’s annual conference, with its theme: Forests. A Way of Life, is as an ideal venue to recognize Andersen because it brings together the foremost thought leaders from the fields of sustainability, conservation and youth outreach. More than 600 people attended Andersen’s keynote address. As Director General of IUCN, Ms. Inger Andersen emphasizes the importance of nature conservation to help achieve sustainable development. “Nature is not an obstacle to human aspirations,” says Ms. Andersen, “It is an essential partner, offering valuable contributions towards all our endeavours. We should all take a moment to stop, think and stand up for our greatest ally – Nature.” Under her leadership, IUCN’s Commission for Education and Communications launched #NatureForAll and the #NatureForAll Playbook, modeled after the Canadian Parks Council’s The Nature Playbook, to help build community support for nature conservation by engaging more individuals to take action for nature. This is now a global movement with more than 175 partners such as Nature Canada, Parks Canada, and SFI connecting people to nature across 36 countries. “Nature Canada is delighted Ms. Inger Andersen has become our 151st Women for Nature, said Ms. Sheefra Brisbin, Vice-Chair of Nature Canada’s Board of Directors and a Women for Nature member. “Ms. Andersen’s work as a champion and role model for the important place that nature plays in our lives is at the heart of Nature Canada’s efforts to connect youth with nature in order to protect our precious wildlife and habitats.” “Recognizing Inger is a perfect launching point to take Women for Nature beyond Canada's borders. I can’t think of anyone who is better placed to achieve our shared goals of elevating the importance of biodiversity and youth engagement, than a woman leader of one of the world’s largest and most powerful conservation organizations,” said Kathy Abusow, SFI Inc.’s President and CEO. Abusow is also a founding member of Women for Nature. Nature Canada’s Women for Nature initiative brings together women of influence from a variety of backgrounds who are demonstrating their passion for nature and driving change. One way they do this is to empower emerging young nature leaders who implement nature-based projects, inspired by The Nature Playbook.


For media assistance please contact: Janet Weichel McKenzie, Nature Canada Media Specialist 613-808-4642 jweichelmckenze@gmail.com About Nature Canada Nature Canada was founded in 1939 because of the passion and initiative of Mabel Frances Whittemore, a teacher and nature lover whose main goal in life was to share her passion for nature with others. Today, Nature Canada represents a network comprised of 50,000 members and supporters and more than 350 nature organizations across the country. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and countless species that depend on this habitat as well as engaging hundreds of thousands of Canadians especially children in nature through its activities. About Women for Nature Nature Canada‘s signature “Women for Nature” initiative raises awareness about the need to connect more Canadians of all ages to nature. The Women for Nature initiative is comprised of women from diverse sectors and backgrounds who come together to champion the importance of nature in the daily lives of all Canadians and to encourage more Canadians to connect with nature. Our founding members include women of influence such as Her Excellency Sharon Johnston, Senator Diane Griffin (Honorary Chair of Women for Nature), Minister Catherine McKenna and Margaret Atwood to name a few. Our members champion efforts to inspire  youth and families to spend time in nature, to learn and experience our natural heritage and in doing so, ensure the health and well-being of our Canadian society. It also has a goal of being 150 Women Strong in celebration of Canada’s 150th anniversary. About the Sustainable Forestry Initiative® Inc. (SFI) SFI® Inc. is a sustainability leader that stands for future forests. We are an independent, non- profit organization that provides supply chain assurances, produces conservation outcomes, and supports education and community engagement. SFI works with the forest sector, brand owners, conservation groups, resource professionals, landowners, educators, local communities, Indigenous peoples, governments, and universities. SFI standards and on-product labels help consumers make responsible purchasing decisions. Additionally, we oversee the SFI Forest Partners® Program, which aims to increase supply of certified forest products, the SFI Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant Program, which funds research and community building, and Project Learning Tree®, which educates teachers and youth about forests and the environment. SFI Inc. is governed by an independent three-chamber board of directors representing environmental, social, and economic sectors equally. SFI believes caring for forests improves everyone’s quality of life. Learn more: sfiprogram.org. Media Contact Daniel Pellegrom SFI Inc. Senior Director, Communications Tel: 202-596-3452 daniel.pellegrom@sfiprogram.org

Nature Canada welcomes New Brunswick’s Lieutenant Governor the Honourable Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau as its newest member of Women for Nature
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Nature Canada welcomes New Brunswick’s Lieutenant Governor the Honourable Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau as its newest member of Women for Nature

Hampton High School student Olivia DesRoches to receive Young Women for Nature Award for her nature leadership on Hampton High School’s 25th anniversary year. HAMPTON, NB (September 20, 2017) Nature Canada, Canada’s oldest national nature conservation charity, is hosting a celebration in partnership with Hampton High School to recognize and welcome the Honourable Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau, Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick as its newest member of Women for Nature initiative. “Nature Canada is delighted Her Honour, The Honourable Jocelyne Roy-Vienneau, Lieutenant Governor of New Brunswick has become our newest Women for Nature,” says Mr. Bob Peart, Chair of Nature Canada’s Board of Directors. “Having Her Honour, as a champion and role model for the important role nature plays in our Canadian culture and identity will help to inspire even more young Canadians to connect with nature and protect our natural heritage.” The celebration also includes a presentation of Nature Canada’s inaugural “Young Women for Nature” award to Hampton High School student Olivia DesRoches. Olivia is being recognized for her initiative and leadership to build and run a school greenhouse aimed at bringing the knowledge of cultivating fruits and vegetables, flowers to fellow high school students. (Media are invited to attend the celebration at Hampton High School on Sept. 21, 2017 at 11:30am) “As the Honorary Chair of Nature Canada’s Women for Nature initiative, I am delighted to see that Canada’s nature is in good hands,” says the Honourable Senator Diane Griffin. "Young nature leaders like Olivia and her project are a step in the right direction to enable more young Canadians to connect with nature and our precious wildlife and habitats,” adds Griffin. “The Greenhouse Project has been a dream of mine for a while now, and now my dream is coming true,” says Olivia DesRoches. “My hope is that this project will give fellow students more insight into the importance of locally grown food as well as help to educate them on environmental needs to make the Earth more sustainable,” adds DesRoches. Nature Canada’s Women for Nature initiative brings together women of influence who choose to demonstrate their passion for nature and drive change. One way they do so is to empower emerging young nature leaders. The initiative recently selected the first recipients of its exciting new Young Nature Leadership Grant aimed at encouraging, fostering and nurturing youth to demonstrate their own leadership for nature. 


For media background and commentary please contact: Mr. Bob Peart, Chair, Nature Canada Board of Directors 250-655-0295 bobpeart@shaw.ca  For media assistance please contact: Janet Weichel McKenzie, Nature Canada Media Specialist 613-808-4642 jweichelmckenze@gmail.com About Nature Canada Nature Canada was founded in 1939 because of the passion and initiative of Mabel Frances Whittemore, a teacher and nature lover whose main goal in life was to share her passion for nature with others. Today, Nature Canada represents a network comprised of 50,000 members and supporters and more than 350 nature organizations across the country. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and countless species that depend on this habitat as well as engaging hundreds of thousands of Canadians especially children in nature through its activities. About Women for Nature Nature Canada‘s signature “Women for Nature” initiative raises awareness about the need to connect more Canadians of all ages to nature. The Women for Nature initiative is comprised of women from diverse sectors and backgrounds who come together to champion the importance of nature in the daily lives of all Canadians and to encourage more Canadians to connect with nature. Our founding members include women of influence such as Her Excellency Sharon Johnston, Senator Diane Griffin (Honorary Chair of Women for Nature), Minister Catherine McKenna and Margaret Atwood to name a few. Our members champion efforts to inspire youth and families to spend time in nature, to learn and experience our natural heritage and in doing so, ensure the health and well-being of our Canadian society.  

Conservation Groups Celebrate Passage of Law that Strengthens Protections for Rouge National Urban Park
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Conservation Groups Celebrate Passage of Law that Strengthens Protections for Rouge National Urban Park

Ecological integrity becomes priority in management of park today. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Ottawa (June 20, 2017) - CPAWS and Nature Canada celebrate a major achievement today for Rouge National Urban Park- Bill C-18 received Royal Assent from the Governor General. The law means ecological integrity will be the first priority in management of Rouge National Urban Park. It meets a key request from leading conservation groups in Canada that the federal government prioritize nature conservation in law for the park. "How sweet it is," says Janet Sumner, Executive Director for CPAWS Wildlands League. "After five years, we are that much closer to achieving our dream of building a truly amazing protected ecological connection for wildlife between the Oak Ridges Moraine and Lake Ontario in the Toronto area," Sumner added.‎ Nature Canada and CPAWS thank Minister Catherine McKenna and her team for leading the amendment process. "We couldn't have done it without the extraordinary leadership and commitment by Minister McKenna and her team to the park," said Eleanor Fast, Executive Director of Nature Canada. The minister made it a priority early in her mandate to strengthen the legislation and find a path forward that includes all involved. The groups are pleased with the result. "The law now meets the international definition of a protected area and ensures the park will have the best chance at long term success given its densely urban surroundings," Fast added. The groups also look forward to working with the farmers in the park on stewardship. Nature Canada and CPAWS have worked closely with both Canada and Ontario to ensure the full potential of Rouge National Urban Park can be achieved. "What an amazing gift this is to Canadians," says Éric Hébert-Daly of CPAWS. "The Rouge is a special place where everyone: newcomers to Canada, friends and families who love the outdoors and those who are just getting to know nature in their own backyard can connect with nature," added Hebert Daly. The Rouge protects a rare Carolinian Forest, is home to over 1,700 species of plants and animals including 23 species at risk. Because it is located in the heart of the GTA, this natural gem will also be an important gateway for residents and visitors to learn about Canada's national park system and the important role it plays in protecting Canada's biodiversity.


For more information please contact:  Janet Sumner, Executive Director CPAWS Wildlands League 416-579-7370 (mobile) Eleanor Fast Executive Director, Nature Canada 613-314-8713 (mobile) Éric Hébert-Daly National Executive Director, CPAWS 613-569-7226 ext 228

Nature Canada welcomes six Young Women from all across Canada as inaugural Young Nature Leadership Grant recipients
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Nature Canada welcomes six Young Women from all across Canada as inaugural Young Nature Leadership Grant recipients

Ottawa, ON (May 12, 2017)—Nature Canada’s Women for Nature initiative is pleased to announce the first recipients of its exciting new Young Nature Leadership Grant. The goal of the grant is to encourage, foster and nurture youth to demonstrate their own leadership for nature. Canadian youth were invited to develop and implement (in 2017) a project inspired by the Canadian Parks Council’s recently published The Nature Playbook that connects a new generation with nature by bringing them into the nature. “As the Honorary Chair of Nature Canada’s Women for Nature initiative, I am delighted to see that Canada’s nature is in good hands,” says the Honourable Senator Diane Griffin. "These young women and their projects being recognized today are a step in the right direction to help enable more young Canadians to connect with nature and assist in protecting our precious wildlife and habitats,” adds Griffin. The inaugural Young Nature Leadership Grant recipients include:

  • Nina Andrascik from Ottawa, ON
  • Olivia DesRoches of Hampton, NB
  • Martha Henderson from Whitehorse, YK
  • Caroline Merner of Victoria, BC
  • Mathilde Papillon from Ottawa, ON
  • Chantal Templeman of Cochrane, AB
They join alongside Chloe Dragon Smith of Yellowknife, NWT to be named as inaugural     Young Women for Nature in Canada’s special anniversary year. “It is exciting to see the diverse projects that have received support from our Young Nature Leadership Grant,” says Eleanor Fast, Executive Director of Nature Canada. “Having young Canadians inspire a new generation of Canadians to nature is an excellent way to connect them to nature - which we believe will ultimately help protect our natural heritage.” "What an awesome way to celebrate Canada's 150th anniversary by empowering emerging Young Nature Leaders to champion nature," says Dawn Carr, Women of Nature member and Executive Director of the Canadian Parks Council. "By working together we can conserve, and encourage new generations to connect with nature."
For media assistance please contact: Janet Weichel McKenzie, Nature Canada Media Specialist 613-808-4642 jweichelmckenze@gmail.com For information on the Women for Nature Young Nature Leaders Grant please contact: Jodi Joy, Director of Development, Nature Canada 613-295-6769 | 1-800-267-4088 jjoy@naturecanada.ca About Nature Canada Nature Canada was founded in 1939 because of the passion and initiative of Mabel Frances Whittemore, a teacher and nature lover whose main goal in life was to share her passion for nature with others. Today, Nature Canada represents a network comprised of 50,000 members and supporters and more than 350 nature organizations across the country. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada and countless species that depend on this habitat as well as engaging hundreds of thousands of Canadians especially children in nature through its activities. About Women for Nature Nature Canada‘s signature “Women for Nature” initiative raises awareness about the need to connect more Canadians of all ages to nature. The Women for Nature initiative is comprised of women from diverse sectors and backgrounds who come together to champion the importance of nature in the daily lives of all Canadians and to encourage more Canadians to connect with nature. Our founding members include women of influence such as Her Excellency Sharon Johnston, Senator Diane Griffin (Honorary Chair of Women for Nature), Her Excellency Elizabeth Dowdeswell, Madame Sophie Grégoire Trudeau, Minister Catherine McKenna and Margaret Atwood to name a few. Our members champion efforts to inspire youth and families to spend time in nature, to learn and experience our natural heritage and in doing so, ensure the health and well-being of our Canadian society. It also has a goal of being 150 Women Strong by Canada’s 150th anniversary.

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