Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada Nature Canada
We know that ducks quack and cows moo, but what then, do Polar Bears do?
News

We know that ducks quack and cows moo, but what then, do Polar Bears do?

[caption id="attachment_24637" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Guest Blogger Tina-Louise Rossit,
Guest Blogger[/caption] This blog was written by guest blogger, Tina-Louise Rossit.  Decoding the grunts and growls of the great white bears The Polar Bear. These great white bears of the north are iconic mammals known for their white coats, enormous wide paws and exceptional hunting skills for their favourite prey choice: seals. Many think of Polar Bears as silent giants, being the largest terrestrial carnivores, but in reality, these bears can be pretty vocal! Now then, what exactly does a Polar Bear sound like? Interestingly, Polar Bears have a wide variety of sounds from growling to humming, chuffing to crying. They may not be loud but they do vocalize when they are distressed, hungry, angry and content. Scent and body language represent a Polar Bear’s main system of communication but vocalization is important for mother to cub relationships, as well as for resolving disputes between males fights for female mates. Let’s begin with Polar Bear cubs. Cubs are dependant on their mother for food and protection from day one. They are born in the den their mother made and only emerge in the springtime when the coldest months have past. Just like any other youngling, they vocalize when they need something, whether it's food or for the mother's affection. Among the bear family, Polar Bears are unique with their “I’m happy” sound. Cubs and adults will make what can be described as an engine humming sound when they are content and/or sleeping. Adults will have a deeper rumble than cubs and as the cubs get older, they communicate to their siblings and mother by grunts and growls. Once they reached adulthood, Polar Bears are solitary animals. Unlike other bear species, Polar Bears are not very territorial. Males and females' range frequently tends to overlap. Problems usually only occur during breeding season when males have to compete for females to mate with. Males will growl viciously as they fight in this situation. Overall, Polar Bear communication is best through other senses than vocalization. Their noses are their number one communication tool as they are highly sensitive to smells. During breeding season, the male scents out a female by her footprints. When hunting, these bears can even smell their prey underwater. Polar Bear communication is still on its way on to being fully understood. With zoos housing Polar Bears, zoo research is in progress to find out more about the great arctic bears. Public visitors also get to see how Polar Bears behave. Soon the sounds of these majestic bears will be known just like knowing that a duck quacks and a cow moos! For more information on Polar Bears, click here.

Email Signup

Want more nature news?

Join our 50,000 nature lovers raising their voices for nature!

Grade 8/secondary 2 classes can enter to win an all-inclusive trip to La Mauricie National Park
News

Grade 8/secondary 2 classes can enter to win an all-inclusive trip to La Mauricie National Park

Nature Canada is proud to announce the start of this year’s Canada’s Coolest School Trip contest. Any grade 8/secondary 2 class can enter to win the grand prize which includes a four-day all-expenses-paid trip to La Mauricie National Park and to historic sites of Québec City, including Lévis Forts, the Fortifications, Saint-Louis Forts and Châteaux, Montmorency Park, the Québec Garrison Club and Artillery Park Heritage Site.

The lucky grand-prize winners will canoe and hike through the breathtaking wilderness of La Mauricie National Park and glimpse the life of a soldier as they travel back in time at Lévis Forts National Historic Site. To finish things off, they will dine at the exclusive Québec Garrison Club National Historic Site and explore the rich history of the only remaining fortified city north of Mexico. There are many other great prizes to win, including three runner-up local field trips and gift packages for five honorable mentions.

To enter the contest, grade 8/secondary 2 classes must pick a Parks Canada place and make a one-minute video on why it’s extraordinary and important to Canadians.

Contest entries will be accepted online at www.myparkspass.ca from September 29, 2014 to February 23, 2015. The contest is open to all grade 8 or secondary 2 classes.

My Parks Pass is a collaborative program between Nature Canada, Parks Canada, Canadian Geographic Education, Canadian Wildlife Federation and Historica Canada. My Parks Pass strives to promote lasting relationships between young Canadians and Canada’s treasured places by inviting youth to experiences Parks Canada places first-hand.

Fantastic video of a monarch butterfly emerging from its Chrysalis
News

Fantastic video of a monarch butterfly emerging from its Chrysalis

Check out this fantastic video of a monarch butterfly emerging from its Chrysalis!

Video: How to grow a tiny forest anywhere
News

Video: How to grow a tiny forest anywhere

Greening your NatureHood! A forest planted by humans, then left to nature’s own devices, typically takes at least 100 years to mature. But what if we could make the process happen ten times faster? In this short talk, eco-entrepreneur Shubhendu Sharma explains how to create a mini-forest ecosystem anywhere.

Video: Polar Bears Need Sea Ice to Survive
News

Video: Polar Bears Need Sea Ice to Survive

Wow. This powerful video will keep you watching until the very end. Polar Bears need sea ice to survive and it's harder and harder to find with their habitat under threat. [video type="youtube" id="hYM4ndcV4Uo"] [h/t: iflscience.com]

Meet our NatureCaretakers
News

Meet our NatureCaretakers

We are proud to launch a video highlighting the successes of the Canadian Important Bird and Biodiversity Areas program. The IBA program is a global initiative to conserve birds and their habitats. In Canada, Nature Canada and Bird Studies Canada co-deliver the program. Together with our partners, we are achieving science-based results and working towards site-specific conservation for birds and other critical biodiversity. The video draws attention to the work of our NatureCaretakers - the eyes, ears and boots on the ground at IBAs across the country. [video type="youtube" id="xpcA5lD18SM"]  

 "Nature Canada is going to keep pushing hard to have the federal government recognize these critically important sites. But, in the meantime, we’re going to have to pull together, roll up our sleeves and do the heavy lifting ourselves. This video will help us do just that by attracting even more volunteer caretakers and by attracting new national sponsors," said Stephen Hazell, Nature Canada Interim Executive Director.
We work with all levels of government, including First Nations, to incorporate IBAs in land-use planning policies and engage corporations and private landowners to include IBAs in their decision-making. Through public awareness campaigns, innovative partnerships with industry, and strengthened bonds with our non-government partners, we enhance the profile of the entire IBA network and achieve greater protection for these priority sites.
 “Advancing the understanding, appreciation, and conservation of wild birds and their habitats is the core of Bird Studies Canada’s mission – and also represents a perfect fit with the IBA Program,” said George Finney, President of Bird Studies Canada.
You can help protect, monitor and educate your community about a nearby IBA by volunteering with the NatureCaretakers program. You would be joining a network of over 200 volunteers who safeguard areas that are critical for breeding and staging birds and other wildlife.
[social icon="youtube"]
[separator headline="h4" title="Our partners:"] [custom_table style="1"]
Nature Canada logo Bird Studies Canada logo BirdLife International Logo Important Bird Areas logo
[/custom_table]

Want to Help?

Canada’s wilderness is the world’s envy. It’s our duty to keep our true north strong and green.

Donate