Endangered species stand a chance of recovering with young nature lovers on their side

“What kinds of obstacles do migratory birds face?”, asked a Nature Canada conservation specialist during a visit to an Ottawa grade one class.

“No food!”, said one child.

“Predators!”, said another.

As part of Nature Canada’s outreach and education activities, we have been working with elementary schools across the city of Ottawa to raise awareness of the challenges migratory birds face and provide suggestions for small things kids can do at home to protect wildlife.

Hundreds of school children from grade one to grade six have heard mini, child-friendly presentations by Nature Canada staff on local endangered birds. They’ve also made colourful bird masks, played a game simulating the challenges of migration and have even used their creativity to help produce a unique stop-motion animation featuring three endangered birds found in the area.

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Just yesterday, the kids of Regina Elementary School were invited to the Canadian Museum of Nature to tour the museum’s Birds of Canada gallery with a Nature Canada conservation specialist on hand to enhance the experience. They had an amazing time and were fascinated by the variety of bird species in Canada.

kids at museum looking at bird displayThey later joined a reception for Nature Canada members held at the Museum of Nature and were able to watch the first version of their stop-motion animation video. They were very pleased with the video they had helped to create!

When Eleanor Fast, Executive Director of Nature Canada, wrapped-up the reception, she ended her remarks by asking if anyone had questions or comments. A Regina School student’s hand shot up.

“I’m very sad about Blanding’s Turtle,” he said.

Indeed, we are all very sad about the decline of Blanding’s Turtle. Thankfully, Blanding’s Turtle stands a chance of surviving when kids like this little lad care about protecting it.