Nature Canada

Protecting the Fraser Shoreline

Join the fight to protect one of North America’s most important migratory bird stopovers.

Despite having already lost almost 80% of its natural habitat, the Fraser estuary today continues to support millions of birds and Canada’s largest migration of wild salmon. Not only is this area popular for many species, it is an important location for Canada’s international trade. Over the past decades, the estuary has been highly developed in order to become one of our major transport and trading hubs, and is now known as Canada’s ‘Gateway to Asia’.

About the Campaign

The Fraser Delta is a critical habitat for many migratory birds, and the destruction of it poses a species-level risk to the Western Sandpipers who rely on tiny organisms called biofilm, a special feature of the ecosystem, as their primary food source to fuel their migratory trip.

Together with our partners Birds Canada and BC Nature, we are asking those in power to put in place a Fraser Estuary Management plan before any more development takes place. This will ensure a balance between the economic development and the biodiversity value of the region.

The Western Sandpiper (pictured), Peregrine Falcons, Barn Swallows, and a rare coastal subspecies of Great Blue Heron are just some of the species at risk.
The Western Sandpiper (pictured), Peregrine Falcons, Barn Swallows, and a rare coastal subspecies of Great Blue Heron are just some of the species at risk.
The Western Sandpiper (pictured), Peregrine Falcons, Barn Swallows, and a rare coastal subspecies of Great Blue Heron are just some of the species at risk.
The Western Sandpiper (pictured), Peregrine Falcons, Barn Swallows, and a rare coastal subspecies of Great Blue Heron are just some of the species at risk.

About the Campaign

The Fraser Delta is a critical habitat for many migratory birds, and the destruction of it poses a species-level risk to the Western Sandpipers who rely on tiny organisms called biofilm, a special feature of the ecosystem, as their primary food source to fuel their migratory trip.

Together with our partners Birds Canada and BC Nature, we are asking those in power to put in place a Fraser Estuary Management plan before any more development takes place. This will ensure a balance between the economic development and the biodiversity value of the region.

How to Help

There are over 100 species at risk in the Fraser.

Subscribe to our mailing list to receive updates on our work to create an overarching protection plan for the Fraser Shoreline that keeps wild spaces and human development in balance.

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Want to Help?

Canada’s wilderness is the world’s envy. It’s our duty to keep our true north strong and green.

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