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The Third Annual Bird Day Fair Soars
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The Third Annual Bird Day Fair Soars

On Saturday May 30, 2015 Nature Canada hosted the third annual Bird Day Fair at Andrew Haydon Park. It was a day where Canadian's welcomed back our migratory birds in a celebration of International Migratory Bird Day in the national capital region's own Important Bird Area. 80% of the bird species that we consider Canadian birds leave our borders every fall and return every spring. Bird Day connects communities across the Northern Hemisphere in a celebration of this incredible journey. [caption id="attachment_21236" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of bird banding Banding an American Robin. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Excited early risers joined Nature Canada’s very own licensed bird bander, Ted Cheskey in the early bird activity: a bird banding demonstration. Ted and his assistants caught an American Robin (pictured above) and a Song Sparrow. Bird banding is a popular research method used by scientists to study birds and learn about their migration and survival. The information collected when the bird is captured along with the band number is shared on a central database that registered bird banders can access. Some birds are caught two or more times at the same or different locations. Participants at the event also had the opportunity to visit the Innis Point Bird Observatory’s booth and learn about bird banding first hand by being banded themselves. Each band shared a number with a bird banded at Innis Point Bid Observatory. You can see which birds were chosen and learn about their story here. [caption id="attachment_21237" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of the Bird Day Fair 2015 the 2015 Bird Day Fair at Andrew Haydon Park. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] 24 local groups hosted a booth at the Bird Day Fair to talk about the excellent work they do to protect wildlife and connect Canadian’s to nature and adventure in the city and beyond. [caption id="attachment_21238" align="aligncenter" width="940"]photo of a child completing the activity passport at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] An activity passport encouraged children to visit the booths and ask questions. A correct answer was rewarded with a stamp or sticker, and children who answered all the questions visited the Nature Canada booth for a prize. [caption id="attachment_21239" align="aligncenter" width="940"]nest building activity at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Local artist Sally Lee Sheeks was back this year with her popular nest building activity. Children used sticks and branches to build a bird’s nest large enough for a person to sit in. Building a nest is more difficult than it looks, and the birds have to do it all with their beaks! [caption id="attachment_21241" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Eagle mascot at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] A giant Eagle also joined the celebrations. Although his day was busy posing for photos, here he is helping a volunteer take a survey. Surveys are an important way for us to learn about what we are doing right, and what we can improve on for next year. The feedback we have received on these surveys has been extremely useful, so a big thank you to everyone who took the time to share their thoughts. [caption id="attachment_21242" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Falcon Ed at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Falcon Ed was back with their live birds of prey. These birds are always a crowd favourite and wowed the crowd all day long at the Falcon Ed booth. Participants got to meet Phoennix the Harris Hawk (pictured above), Darwin the Great Horned Owl and Dexter the Peregrine Falcon. [caption id="attachment_21243" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Little Rays Reptiles at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] Little Ray’s Reptiles presented their "Endangered Ontario" show at the Bird Day Fair and captivated the audience. Their show featured 2 birds of prey, 2 ferrets, 2 snakes, 2 turtles an amphibian and a fox - all from Ontario of course! [caption id="attachment_21244" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Print making activity at the Bird Day Fair 2015 Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Young and young at heart alike got to try out their artistic skills with help from local artist Lyle Docherty in a print making activity. Lyle had prepared templates of an American Robin, a Blue Jay (pictured above), a Bald Eagle, a Common Loon and a Canadian Goose for people to create their own work of art. [caption id="attachment_21245" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Mayor Waston and Giacomo Panico announce the Ottawa's Bird Contest winner And the winner is.... Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] And the winner of the unofficial Bird of Ottawa Contest is ......... the Black-capped Chickadee! On April 25 CBC radio’s In Town and Out asked listeners and followers of the weekly Tweet of the Week segment to nominate their favourite. After a month of voting and over 3,300 submissions the winner was announced at the Bird Day Fair by Mayor Jim Watson and Giacomo Panico. The Black-capped Chickadee was the clear favourite with 42% of the votes. The Common Raven gained a great deal of support near the end of the competition, but was not able to overtake the lead, ending with 32% of the vote. [caption id="attachment_21269" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure A Flamingo Flash Mob. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] A flock of migrating Flamingos go blown very off course, astonishing and amazing attendees of the Bird Day Fair with their coordinated moves. Young dancers from Lakeview Public School dressed as Flamingos made a surprise appearance at the Bird Day Fair to perform their Flamingo Dance choreographed by dance teacher Lindsay Mattesz. This performance was clearly a crowd favourite. [caption id="attachment_21246" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Purple Martin colony The Purple Martin Colony at the Nepean Sailing Club. Photography by Julia Gamble[/caption] Nature Canada is working on the Purple Martin project, an international collaboration with Purple Matin landloards, university researchers, naturalists groups, and the Canadian Wildlife Service to help protect and recover declining Purple Martin populations. We are using GPS tracking devices to follow them on their migration journey to their wintering grounds in order to understand the risks they face. One colony that Nature Canada is studying is just a short walk from Andrew Haydon Park at the Nepean Sailing Club. A guided walk led by the Purple Martin project coordinator gave people the opportunity to see these birds up close and in action. If you look closely you just might be able to see a tracking device or a coloured leg band on one of these birds. [caption id="attachment_21265" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure Tony Beck of Always an Adventure captivates the crowd as he shares his nature photography tips. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Participants at the Bird Day Fair were invited to join a guided walk to learn the basics of birding, get some tips to improve their nature photos and more. [caption id="attachment_21267" align="aligncenter" width="940"]Photography by Susanne Ure Photography by Susanne Ure [/caption] And what’s a Bird Day Fair without bird watching? This family of ducks posed for the cameras. Some other species that we expected to see at the park are; Purple Martin, Tree Swallow, Yellow-rumped Warbler, American Redstart, Ring-billed Gull, Killdeer, Canada Goose, American Goldfinch, Yellow Warbler and Hooded Merganser. Thank you to our Event Partners and Sponsors who made this day possible!

Environment for the Americas logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo OC Transpo logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
Nikon logo Henry's logo Richie Feed and Seed logo White Swan logo

Come out to the Bird Day Fair May 2015
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Come out to the Bird Day Fair May 2015

Bird Day Fair 2015 event poster Join Nature Canada at the third annual Bird Day Fair which will be held at Andrew Haydon Park in Ottawa on Saturday May 30, 2015 from 10am-3pm. Just as our migratory birds are returning to Canada from their wintering grounds south of the border, a huge celebration is unfolding across the continent to celebrate birds – and you can be part of it! Bird Day is a celebration of migratory birds and the wild spaces they inhabit. Join Nature Canada in a celebration of the incredible migration journey of birds through a day of fun activities for the whole family. There will be nature walks, crafts and activities, live animals, and an opportunity to meet local groups working to protect wildlife.     [caption id="attachment_20261" align="aligncenter" width="960"]photos from the Bird Day Fair 2014 Photography by Susanne Ure of the Bird Day Fair 2014[/caption] [separator headline="h2" title="Participating groups"] The following groups will host a booth at the Bird Day Fair to talk about the excellent work they do to protect wildlife and connect Canadian's to nature and adventure in the city and beyond.

Always and Adventure logo BioRegional logo Canadian Geographic logo City Wide Sports logo
Falcon Ed logo FLAP Canada Ottawa Wing logo Girl Guides of Canada logo Greenspace Alliance of Canada's Capital Logo
Greening Sacred Spaces Ottawa Chapter logo Henry's logo Innis Point Bird Observatory logo Kitchen Cone logo
Lindian Enterprise logo Maser Gardeners of Ottawa Carleton logo Mississippi valley conservation authority logo Nature Conservancy of Canada logo
Ottawa Duck Club logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo St John Ambulance logo Tucker House logo
Tree Ottawa logo Wax and Wings logo Wild Bird Care Centre logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
Little Rays Reptile Zoo logo circus delights Sally Sheeks logo
Archy and Mehitabel logo Maria-Helena Pacelli logo Angry Drangonz logo Urban Cowboy logo
[separator headline="h2" title="Schedule for the day"] Early Bird Activity: Nature Canada's very own licensed bird bander, Ted Cheskey, will lead a bird banding demonstration at Andrew Haydon Park from 8:30 am-10:00 am Check out what happened at the Bird Day Fair 2014. Stay up to date on the latest Bird Day Fair plans on the facebook event page. Schedule Guided Walks poster ENG [separator headline="h2" title="Plan your trip to the Bird Day Fair"] Map to Andrew Haydon ParkThe Bird Day Fair will be held at Andrew Haydon Park (3169 Carling Avenue, Nepean) which is at the intersection of Carling Ave and Holly Acres Rd. [separator headline="h3" title="Cycle or Walk"] Andrew Haydon Park is along the Ottawa River bike path. Check the cycling map to plan your route. [separator headline="h3" title="Take Public Transit"] OC Transpo is the easy way to get to the event! Take the Bird Day Fair shuttle bus provided by OC Transpo from Bayshore station, a transit hub. The shuttle will depart from transit station 4A (see the highlight space on the map below) and drop you off steps from the Fair. The shuttle is free of charge and will run every 15 min from 10am - 3pm. station 4A map [separator headline="h3" title="Driving"] Please remember that there is limited parking on site. [separator headline="h2" title="Partners"] Nature Canada is proud to partner with the following organizations to host Bird Day 2015
Environment for the Americas logo Ottawa Field Naturalists logo OC Transpo logo
  [separator headline="h2" title="Sponsors"] Thank you to the generous support of our sponsors. Without whom this event would not be possible.
Ottawa Field Naturalists logo Nikon logo Henry's logo Wild Birds Unlimited logo
White Swan logo Richie Feed and Seed logo

Inside the Mudlake Biodiversity Project
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Inside the Mudlake Biodiversity Project

“Do we have this one yet?” Harold Sotomayor asked his friend and project partner Patrick Killeen after we came across a white capped mushroom covered by bushes to the side of the trail. “Well, let’s snap a photo of it anyways, just in case.” Welcome to the world of the Mud Lake Biodiversity project, an ongoing citizen science experiment in which the goal is to document and record every living organism in the Mud Lake Conservation Area of Ottawa, Ontario. The project, which has attracted photo contributions from outside members of the community, is a mix of deductive science and taxonomic gamification and has helped its creators learn a lot about their local environment and its biodiversity. [caption id="attachment_17602" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of the Mud Lake Biodiversity project team Patrick Killeen (left) and Harold Sotomayor (right)[/caption] Sotomayor explained the initial idea stemmed from the television show and video game Pokemon which he used to watch and play as a child. “When I started, the idea for the project was to create a catalogue like a Pokedex” Sotomayor said. “I genuinely thought we would come out here and find like five birds. I had no idea about how much I did not know.” Home to over 200 species of birds, around 50 varieties of moss and hundreds of different trees and plants, Mud Lake is a naturalist's dream. Located just west of downtown Ottawa, the area contains many ecological biomes including: a riparian section along the bank of the Ottawa River, a woodland area and wetlands around the lake itself. Unlike the mass of wildlife found at Mud Lake, the project has remained reasonably quiet and contained. For the past four years, Patrick and Harold have been making trips out to the lake with a camera and documenting any life they find. Nothing is omitted from the project. Plants, animals, fungi, insects... even bacteria and protists, which Harold collects and analyzes at home under an electron microscope, are included and added to the growing database and website. [caption id="attachment_17603" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of White breasted nuthatch at Mud Lake White breasted nuthatch at Mud Lake[/caption] “We began with just animals and plants, but once people started visiting the website, we sort of felt an obligation to expand and include everything,” Sotomayor said. Patrick Killeen, 20, makes up one half of the pair. He is currently a computer science student at the University of Ottawa and is credited by Harold as having the greater taxonomic knowledge of the two. “I wasn’t really interested in biology before the project,” Killeen said. “Growing up my dad would tell me stuff and I was sort of forced to learn the information. But then, after the project began, I actually wanted to learn so that’s when I gained a huge boost of knowledge.” Harold Sotomayor, 29, is the creative mind behind the enterprise. He is currently using the site to work on his programming skills while working part time and also managing the biodiversity project. The two have been able to parlay the project into educational opportunities with outside organizations. Harold and Patrick have led educational tours through Mud Lake with adult high school students as well as by leading tours at Nature Canada's fall BioBlitz event. [caption id="attachment_17604" align="aligncenter" width="200"]photo of microscope use Harold gets a close look at bacteria and protists under the microscope[/caption] The pair want the project to remain small and without ads and said their next goal is to include more of the areas diverse mosses and insects. For those interested in learning more about the project, or contributing to the growing collection of photos you can check it out at: www.mudlakebiodiversity.com. The site is also expected to receive a coming user interface revamp in the coming weeks with new graphics. Thank you to our guest blogger Dylan Copland for this post and photos. Dylan is a journalist and media specialist living in Ottawa, Ontario. He is currently volunteering with Nature Canada where he is writing about animals, nature and the people who love them. You can reach him at dmcopland@gmail.com and find his portfolio on the web at: dylancopland.wordpress.com.

Exploring Canada’s Creatures of the Night
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Exploring Canada’s Creatures of the Night

Not all creatures are ones that you can spot during the day. In fact, there are many species you can find at night that are just as fascinating! If you interested in going on, or organizing your own, night nature walk we offer the following tips to improve this experience: Dress Warmly Often times you'll be standing still listening for creature noises or stopping to examine an animal you've come across. Don't underestimate the drop in temperature during the night. [caption id="attachment_37787" align="alignright" width="305"]Image of a Boreal Owl Photo of a Boreal Owl[/caption] Bring Flashlights, but use them sparingly Flashlights will not harm nocturnal creatures, but they will scare them off. It's often best to let your eyes adjust to the natural light reflected by the moon than it is to use battery powered lights. Bring a recorded owl call Recorded owl calls are a great way to induce a barn or screech owl to return a call, but use them sparingly as owls will assume a potential rival is infringing on their territory and you don't want to disturb them too much! Also remember to start with the calls of the smallest owl first (such as a saw whet owl) and work your way up to the larger owls (such as a great grey owl) as even small owls will be intimated by the presumed presence of the large owls and will fall silent. Be as quiet as you can In the dark, listening to creatures can be as important (and rewarding) as seeing them with your eyes. Naturalists are just as happy to hear an owl as they are to see one. However, you do stand a greater chance of seeing animals if you're not making a lot of noise. Have people look in different directions Organize your group so that your eyes cover as much of the surrounding area as possible. A sighting is a sighting whether it's done by you or someone else! Know the trails before heading out The last thing you want is to be lost out on the trails in the middle of night. Make sure you have prior knowledge of the pathways and always know how to get back to the entrance. Bring a map, if possible, and ensure you have some a cellphone in case of an emergency.


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In 2014, Nature Canada did our own night walk to look for nocturnal creatures. We began our walk along the dark trail guided only by the beams of light provided by our head lamps and flashlights. The low, constant hum of crickets could immediately be heard from the brush lining the path and was occasionally punctuated by the chirp of birds that had bedded down for the night. We approached our first bait station, located near the trail entrance, to see what creatures our fermented brew had attracted. By day, Ottawa's Mud Lake is host to a wide variety of active creatures from snapping turtles, to blue heron and all manner of insects, but by night, the wooded areas surrounding the lake transform and -- if you're lucky or have a particularly attuned set of eyes – a very different set of creatures can be seen. Mud Lake is also the site of Ottawa's NatureHood program. On this evening, a group of visitors had gathered at Ottawa's Mud Lake to explore the often overlooked biodiversity of the area at night. Spotting nocturnal animals is a fun activity, but it's also an important one if we are to know the makeup of Canada's biodiversity. We spotted a rabbit stopped to observe our group at one point, its eyes glowing eerily from the reflected light of our camera flashes. At our second bait station we encountered not moths, but a group of white banded ants that our sweet potion had attracted. The ants quickly scurried away from the gaze of our lights, but we were able to get a close look at a black spider that had set up a web between two bushes nearby. As we made our way to the final bait stations, we stopped to look out on the lake. A muskrat bobbed up and down in the dark water as it made its way to the far shore. At the final station we found that our bait had attracted a moth! It stayed still long enough on the tree for us to identify it as a sharp-winged shade. Based on what we know about moths (and our own limited success at spotting them at the Mud Lake nature walk) in the fall season, moths become more difficult to see due to falling temperatures. However, there are plenty of other nocturnal creatures that can be seen year-round in the Canadian environment. Chris Earley is an Interpretive biologist at the Guelph Arboretum at the University of Guelph, where he's been leading night time nature walks for close to 20 years. He says that many of Canada's nocturnal creatures can still be seen when the temperature drops including: great horned owls, barn owls, flying squirrels, rabbits, coyotes and other small mammals. “Nature walks are actually a great winter activity,” Earley said. “The freshly fallen snow makes it a very pretty environment to go owl watching.” Earley leads evening nature sightseeing events and workshops called Owl Prowls in which a group of visitors learn about the creatures before heading out into a wooded area at the arboretum to attempt to spot or hear the owls using territorial calls. Earley says going out and exploring Canada's nocturnal creatures can lead to some interesting nature stories and sightings. Thank you to our guest blogger Dylan Copland for this post and photos. Dylan is a journalist and media specialist living in Ottawa, Ontario. He is currently volunteering with Nature Canada where he is writing about animals, nature and the people who love them. And thank you to Alex MacDonald with Nature Canada, Chris Earley with the University of Guelph and Casey Whiterock with the Stanley Park Ecological Society for providing information for this article.

Bird Tweet of the Week: Wilson’s Warbler
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Wilson’s Warbler

We typically see Wilson’s Warblers in this region during the spring and fall migrations, as they are moving to and from their breeding grounds in the boreal forest. Even during migration this species is a bundle of energy, and is most often seen flitting in and out of shrubs and bushes to catch insects. [caption id="attachment_16979" align="alignleft" width="300"]photo Wilson's Warbler Wilson's Warbler Photo taken by David A. Hofmann[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio’s In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to “Bird Tweet of the Week” on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website.

This episode aired on Saturday October 4, 2014

Bird Tweet of the Week: Black-crowned Night-Heron
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Black-crowned Night-Heron

During the breeding season Night-herons do also hunt by day given the high-energy demands of raising and feeding up to 7 young at a time. This round-the-clock feeding and foraging behaviour is of course similar to that of new human parents. [caption id="attachment_16925" align="alignleft" width="300"]photo black-capped night-heron Black-capped Night-Heron Photo by Rick Leche Photography[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio’s In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to “Bird Tweet of the Week” on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website. This episode aired on Saturday September 27, 2014

Foresters volunteers join Nature Canada’s BioBlitz
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Foresters volunteers join Nature Canada’s BioBlitz

Nature Canada wants to thank the wonderful volunteers at Foresters for joining us at the Fall BioBlitz. Foresters insurance company partners with charitable organizations to support families and communities through volunteering events. The Fall BioBlitz was one such event. 15 volunteers joined Nature Canada at the Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake to build bird and bat houses. In total 24 bird houses and 12 bat houses were constructed and donated to Nature Canada. We will work with communities to place the bird and bat houses in critical spots around the city to support healthy urban wildlife populations. Thank you Foresters volunteers! [caption id="attachment_16901" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of family building a bird house Building bird houses at the BioBlitz[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16900" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of people building a bat house Building a bat house at the BioBlitz[/caption] [caption id="attachment_16902" align="aligncenter" width="945"]photo of volunteers with complete bird and bat housees Foresters volunteers with the completed bird and bat houses at the BioBlitz[/caption] Photography by Susanne Ure.

Bird Tweet of the Week: American Bittern
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Bird Tweet of the Week: American Bittern

If it feels threatened, the Bittern will stand motionless with its long neck and bill pointed to the sky, allowing it to blend into the cat tails and reeds. [caption id="attachment_16911" align="alignleft" width="300"]photo American Bittern American Bittern Photo by Kelly Colgan Azar[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio’s In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to “Bird Tweet of the Week” on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website. This episode aired on Saturday September 20, 2014

Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014
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Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake, September 2014

Thanks to everyone who came out to take part in the adventure and help us identify local wildlife at Nature Canada’s Fall BioBlitz. Over 150 citizens of the national capital region accompanied local expert naturalists on guided walks where they learned to identify plants, birds, amphibians, reptiles and more! [caption id="attachment_16892" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of birders Birding early in the morning at the BioBlitz. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] The BioBlitz brought out experts and amateur enthusiasts alike on one of the first brisk weekends of the fall to Mud Lake conservation area. Mud Lake is considered by many to be a wilderness gem in the heart of our busy city and is found within the Lac Deschênes- Ottawa River Important Bird Area. It was the perfect location for such an inventory. Easy to get to and containing various habitats in a confined area, Mud Lake is an ideal spot to connect to your NatureHood. A BioBlitz take many forms, but is generally an intense 24 hour survey of a location with a mission to identify as many living things as possible at the site. This event is part of a larger effort to learn more about the state of local biodiversity and catalogue changes over time in population patterns. It is also a great opportunity to connect urban citizens to nearby nature right in the city. [caption id="attachment_16893" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of moss Examining the aptly named fern moss. Photography by Susanne Ure[/caption] Each walk focused on a particular group of plants or animals. An ultraviolet light focused on a white sheet called-in night-flying insects for close examination after the sun had set. Birders, expert and aspiring, rose early to search out common and rare species. We even got an up close look at snapping turtle hatchlings that were making their way from the nest to the water. Not event rain could dampen the enthusiasm of those on the Saturday afternoon plant and reptile walks. The final species list included species listed as at risk in Ontario and federally including the snapping turtle and the butternut tree. All in all it was a very exciting 24 hours! We would like to thank everyone who came out to help us survey the area, in particular all the fantastic local naturalists who shared their expertise and helped to make the day such a resounding success! [caption id="attachment_16894" align="aligncenter" width="300"]photo of young snapping turtle. Snapping turtle hatchling. Photography by Sarah Kirkpatrick-Wahl[/caption] We hope you can join us for the next BioBlitz in the spring. Check out more photos from the event, learn more about how Foresters volunteers worked to help Nature Canada at the BioBlitz and read the full list of species identified over the 24hour period (coming soon).

Tweet of the Week: Passenger Pigeon
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Tweet of the Week: Passenger Pigeon

On the 100 year anniversary of the last passenger pigeon, Martha, we bring you this special edition of Tweet of the Week. [caption id="attachment_16406" align="alignleft" width="241"]passenger pigeons Passenger Pigeons art by John James Audubon care of special collections Toronto Public Library[/caption]

Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio’s In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to “Bird Tweet of the Week” on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website.

This episode aired on Saturday September 13, 2014

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