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Keeping your Birdbath Clean
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Keeping your Birdbath Clean

Why You Should Maintain your Birdbath

Maintaining a clean birdbath is essential for the health of visiting birds. Birds that bathe in the water may leave behind dirty feathers and droppings, which can make the birdbath increasingly unsanitary and filthy for other visiting birds. Dirty and stationary water also attracts mosquitoes, which can carry the West Nile virus and transmit it through their eggs, which they lay in the bath. Changing the water every day or two can help prevent the spread of diseases as well as algal growth, which forms a lot more quickly when the water is not changed frequently.

How to Maintain your Birdbath

There are many ways to ensure that your birdbath is set up correctly for the birds. Placing the bath in the shade can help keep the water cool and fresh, especially in the summer. Having the bath near feeders or woody brush and branches can provide a place for the birds to preen, however keep in mind that the birdbath should not be directly under these as the debris would get into the water. Likewise, having some running water can make the birdbath more attractive and help prevent mosquitoes from laying eggs in the water. This will minimize the chance of disease spreading to the birds and other animals. You should ideally be changing the water in your birdbath every couple of days, and cleaning it 2 or 3 times a week, or when you begin to see some discolouration in the water. The first step in the cleaning process is to empty the bath of old water, and to remove any debris that may have fallen into the bath. Next, using a high-pressure hose, or just a normal hose, spray the bath until most of the dirt is removed. If there is any additional dirt left on the bottom, then a stiff brush or wire wool with a cleaning solution can be used to scrub the rest of the dirt and algae off the bottom. However, instead of using bleach to clean the birdbath, consider making a solution of one part distilled white vinegar to nine parts water. If the birdbath is especially dirty, then soak the bath with the vinegar solution for a couple of minutes, making sure the bath itself is covered so that no birds attempt to drink from it during the cleaning process.

don't forget!

For best practices, it is best to remember to keep the birdbath full, keep it out of the way of falling debris, keep it in the shade, and to remove old stagnant water and replace with fresh and clean water. These methods will help you be a good host to backyard birds, as well as help prevent diseases from spreading, so you can enjoy bird watching all summer long!

Nature Canada’s trip to Howe Island
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Nature Canada’s trip to Howe Island

On Monday, April 29, I, along with Ted Cheskey (Naturalist Director, Nature Canada) went down to Howe Island, Ontario to meet with Aric McBay. Aric is the Membership Development & Special Projects Manager, of the National Farmers Union. The intent of our visit was to provide advice and guidance on Purple Martin stewardship. Kurt Hennige (Kingston Field Naturalists), a man with a wealth of knowledge and experience with birds and nature, was also invited to share his expertise. Along with Aric, Tracey Guptill and Tim Dowling were also present and keen to learn the tricks of the trade of Purple Martin stewardship.

what we did

During our time visiting the farm, we learned that they had recently switched from a dairy farm to a grass-fed beef-selling farm. We were pleased to learn that they were all passionate about sustainable, ecological farming and that protecting nature was a high priority for them. Almost as if we were being welcomed by nature on a farm that prioritizes protecting wildlife, we saw four Broad-winged Hawks high in the skies in the midst of their return migration to the north, followed by a darting Eastern Meadowlark searching the pastures for some insects. After the excitement of seeing these beautiful birds had waned a little, it was time to check out the newly installed Purple Martin housing units. Even though Purple Martins had not yet arrived on Howe Island, a few Tree Swallows had began piling twigs in some compartments in preparation of attracting a mate and building a nest. While we were checking the compartments, Kurt Hennige and Ted Cheskey were busy sharing multiple lifetimes’ worth of insights that will help Aric in becoming a great steward of Ontario’s largest swallow species.

the highlight

The highlight of this visit was to see farmers and naturalists come together and discuss how to protect vulnerable species by using the knowledge bases that each group possesses. Partnerships between these two groups is essential in protecting wildlife and nature. Many species that naturalists fight to protect are often found on farmlands, and by working together we can increase the chance of saving these species before it is too late. To end our visit, we were invited inside for some tea with fresh milk from the farm. It was a great opportunity to sit and share ideas about sustainability, protecting bird species and continuing collaboration in future endeavours.

Celebrating Bird Day!
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Celebrating Bird Day!

On Saturday, May 11th, nature groups across North America celebrated World Migratory Bird Day to welcome back the return of migratory birds. In Canada, 80% of bird species leave our borders every fall to their wintering grounds and return every spring to nest.

Bird Day at the ottawa children's festival

Nature Canada hosted a Bird Day event in conjunction with the Ottawa Children’s Festival, as an opportunity for children and families to get outside, learn about migratory birds and be inspired to take part in conservation. Falcon Ed was back with a spectacular bird of prey flight demonstration. These majestic birds are always a crowd favourite, and this year participants saw up close a Harris hawk, Barn owl, American Kestrel and Great-Horned owl. The Honourable Catherine McKenna, Minister of Environment and Climate Change and Member of Parliament for Ottawa Centre, and Ottawa Councillor Catherine McKenney attended and gave remarks on the importance of reducing plastic for bird conservation. And what’s a Bird Day event without bird watching? Families participated in a guided nature walk with Nature Canada’s resident naturalist, Ted Chesky, who led them down to the river where they learned the basics of birding. Some of the species spotted included, Tree and Barn swallow, Canada goose, Mallard, Killdeer, Ring-billed gull, Cormorant and Oriole.

celebrating birds across Canada!

Similar events took place across the country and throughout the Americas to celebrate World Migratory Bird Day, a project created by Environment for the Americas to raise awareness on the need to conserve birds and their habitats. This year’s conservation theme is “Protect Birds: Be the solution to Plastic Pollution” to raise awareness of the risks migratory birds face from ingesting plastics to entanglement. On the heels of a major UN report sounding the alarm on the devastating impact of humans on nature, Bird Day events can help raise awareness of bird conservation and showcase how individuals can make a difference for wildlife. Thank you to everyone who participated! See you next year!

Press Release: Ottawa Bird Day
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Press Release: Ottawa Bird Day

May 8, 2019 OTTAWA - Nature Canada in collaboration with the Ottawa Children’s Festival is hosting a free public event at LeBreton Flats Park on Saturday, May 11, 2019 to welcome back the birds. Ottawa Bird Day is part of World Migratory Bird Day (WMBD), an annual event celebrating the spectacular journey of nearly 350 migratory bird species as they travel from their wintering grounds in Latin America, Mexico and the Caribbean to their nesting habitat in Canada. "Protect Birds: Be the Solution to Plastic Pollution" is the 2019 theme to raise awareness of the risks migratory birds face from ingesting plastics, to entanglement. On the heels of a major UN report sounding the alarm on the devastating impact of humans on nature, Bird Day events can help raise awareness of bird conservation and showcase how individuals can make a difference for wildlife. “Local Bird Day events are a great opportunity for children and families to get outdoors, learn about migratory birds and be inspired to take part in conservation,” says Jill Sturdy, NatureHood Program Manager. The Ottawa Bird Day event will take place rain or shine at LeBreton Flats Park from 10am to 3pm and will include naturalist-led walks to observe birds and their habitat and nature activities for all ages. Environment and Climate Change Minister Catherine McKenna and Somerset Ward Councilor Catherine McKenney will make remarks and welcome participants just before noon. Event participants will also get a rare chance to see owls and falcons in flight as part of a Birds of Prey demonstration put on by Falcon Education. Similar events are taking place across the country and throughout the Americas to celebrate World Migratory Bird Day, a project created by Environment for the Americas to raise awareness on the need to conserve birds and their habitats. Groups across the country have listed their events on a map hosted at http://birdday.ca, a joint initiative of Nature Canada and Bird Studies Canada. Follow the discussion online using #BirddayEh. For more information contact: Jill Sturdy, 613-276-7226 jsturdy@naturecanada.ca For the Ottawa event schedule go to here. Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada that works to connect people to nature and in doing so protect and conserve wildlife and habitats. Over the past 75 years, Nature Canada has helped protect more than 63 million acres of parks and wildlife areas in Canada, and represents a network of over 100,000 members and supporters and more than 750 nature organizations across the country. www.naturecanada.ca

Hudsonian Godwit now threatened
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Hudsonian Godwit now threatened

Hudsonian Godwit was added to the growing list of threatened wildlife species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) during deliberations last week.  It is the eighth shorebird species to be added to the COSEWIC list. COSEWIC is an independent body of species scientists who have the responsibility of assessing and attributing a status to Canadian wildlife species. COSEWIC meets twice annually to assess and assign status to Canada’s ever-growing list of species under review. Once COSEWIC attributes a status of either Special Concern, Threatened or Endangered, the Federal government has six months to rule on whether the species is added to one Schedule One of Canada Species at Risk Act (SARA). Once that happens, the species then has the added power of federal law to contribute to its recovery. Figure 1 from the Macaulay Library, Cornell Labratory of Ornithology, Birds of North America


why the Hudsonian Godwit's survival is threatened

The Hudsonian Godwit has many life-history characteristics that render its populations vulnerable to habitat loss, climate change impacts, and pollution. For starters, its breeding range is restricted to a small area along the Hudson Bay coast, a small area along the Beaufort Sea near the Mackenzie River delta, and some scattered locations in western Alaska. The more restricted the range of a species, the more vulnerable it is to localized catastrophic events like a severe storm or fire.  Its global population is estimated at 50,000 to 70,000 birds. Climate change is happening at an accelerated rate in the Arctic, and it is likely that a combination of melting permafrost, sea level rise and drought is already impacting Godwit productivity. Challenges only get greater along its tremendous migration route, a 20,000 to 30,000 km round trip from the Arctic to southern tip of South America.  Godwits are known to fly thousands of kilometres non-stop from James Bay or the Atlantic Coast to the northern coast of South America. Loss and degradation of habitat, pollution and disturbance from humans are all threats that undermine the viability of essential stopover sites along its migration route.

Nature Canada knows this species well

It is one of the focal species in our work to support Cree Nations along southern James Bay with their own conservation efforts. For example, about 10% of its global population is known to stopover along the coast of the Moose Cree First Nation, contributing to the status of this coastline as Pei lay sheesh kow a candidate Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network site. Other areas around James Bay also support significant numbers of the species on migration, particularly the delta and associated coastline near the mouth of the Albany River, which is believed to support about 20% of the species population. Nature Canada has worked with the Cree Nation of Waskaganish since 2012 to identify important shorebird habitat along their coastal region, leading to recognizing the Miinshtuk-Wiinebek IBA, a new Important Bird and Biodiversity Area on James Bay.  We have also found large numbers of Hudsonian Godwits in the area in flocks of up to 350 individuals. We hope to continue this work further north with the Cree Nation of Wemindji where more areas of importance to the Hudsonian Godwit and other threatened species can be identified and protected.

what canada needs to do

By finding out these birds are stopping during their epic migrations, and ensuring that area is safe and that the local population is engaged in stewardship and able to provide the species habitat needs, we are able to contribute to the species recover. Stopover habitat is like the links in a chain. Each link is essential to the chain’s existence. Shorebirds depend upon networks of these chains of stopover sites for their survival. The sites can easily become degraded from human activity, from upstream pollution, from oil and chemical spills, from invasive species, or from competing human activities. Canada needs to step up to recognize the critical sites in Canada, like James Bay, and support the indigenous nation’s efforts to recognize and protect these sites.

Sei Whale and Short-Fin Mako Shark Endangered; Hudsonian Godwit Threatened
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Sei Whale and Short-Fin Mako Shark Endangered; Hudsonian Godwit Threatened

Monday May 6 was not a great day for species at risk.  On the morning of May 6, the 455 scientists on the UN’s Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) announced that close to one million species are nearing extinction globallyThat same afternoon, Canada’s Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC) announced its revised list of species at risk.

The news is not good

COSEWIC scientists have determined that the Sei whale and the short-fin mako shark are now endangered, and the Hudsonian godwit is threatened. COSEWIC decided that the Vancouver Island marmot should remain on the endangered species—it was first listed as endangered in 2008. Only 30 individuals exist in the world. One bit of good news is that the status of the Pacific population of fin whale is improved from threatened to special concern; the Atlantic population of fin whale also has a special concern status. Members of the same family as the blue and fin whale, the Sei whale inhabits most oceans and prefers deep offshore waters. The short-fin mako is the fastest-swimming shark in the world. This species is more vulnerable than many other Atlantic sharks because of its long lifespan and low reproductive rate. The Canadian Atlantic population was listed as threatened in 2006, and was improved to special concern in 2017. The Hudsonian godwit is a large shorebird that migrates from the Canadian Arctic to southern South America, but has a breeding range restricted to a small part of the Hudson Bay coast and small areas in Alaska and the Northwest Territories. Much of the population of Hudsonian godwit stops over in southern James Bay en route.

Species at risk need marine protected areas

These new species at risk listings underline the importance of protecting marine and coastal areas. Canada is committed to protecting 10 per cent of our oceans and has made good progress towards that goal in the past few years, announcing, for example, protection of the Laurentian Channel off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador. The Pacific Deep Sea Oasis off the British Columbia also needs protection as a marine protected area. The Moose Cree First Nation are pressing for recognition of the James Bay coast as a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network (WHSRN) site, and for recognition and respect by other levels of government that it is protected under Indigenous law. Nature Canada is focused on ensuring a doubling of Canada’s protected areas by 2020.  All tools available to governments, Indigenous communities and nature conservancies need to be deployed urgently to protect as much nature as possible: the $1.3 billion in the 2018 federal budget allocated to establishing new protected areas and protecting species at risk is a big boost in that effort.

Ready, Set, REVERSE: New UN report calls to prevent the extinction of nature
A bee pollinating flowers, captured by Ilana C Block.
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Ready, Set, REVERSE: New UN report calls to prevent the extinction of nature

A game-changing new international report was released today on Nature’s Dangerous Decline. It’s the kind of reading that can keep you up at night, and then help us all rethink our priorities in the morning. Produced by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), the findings, prepared by hundreds of experts from 50 countries, depict an alarming picture of the on-going destruction of nature, and a loss of species not seen since the age of the dinosaurs. Extinction looms for one million species of plants and animals. Species loss is accelerating at a rate tens or hundreds of times faster than in the past, according to the report. More than half-a-million terrestrial species have insufficient habitat for long-term survival and are likely to go extinct; marine species are no better off. The report shows that unsustainable human activity—from deforestation to industrial farming— has already "severely altered" 40% of the planet’s marine environments, 50% of inland waterways, and 75% of land.

Why does it matter? 

As Indigenous peoples have known for millennia, all life depends on nature—for food, water, energy and wellbeing. All species – including algae, insects, trees, animals and humans – are fundamentally interconnected. In the 1980s two conservation researchers, Paul and Anne Ehrlich, tried to help the Western world understand this system by explaining that species are to ecosystems as rivet fasteners are to airplanes. One missing rivet may go unnoticed, but with each subsequent loss, the passengers are heading for certain disaster. The IPBES report sets itself apart from many other scientific studies by drawing on Indigenous knowledge and the experience of local peoples who have been preserving ecosystems for generations. The report also underscores how the current attack on nature will impact Indigenous peoples and the world's poorest communities most severely including increasing their vulnerability to climate change.

Twin threats  

The IPBES report clearly identifies that loss of nature is as big as climate change. The two are deeply connected. If we lose forests and mangroves, we undercut the planet’s ability to hold carbon. Climate change also affects habitat, creating hard-to-survive changes to wildlife. The message? Business as usual is not an option. Once a species is lost there is no going back. Extinction is by definition irreversible. But as the report makes clear, we can solve the impending extinction crises and ensure nature, and all of us, can flourish.

The road map to restore nature– Protected Places

We know that protecting habitat is essential for the survival and recovery of species. There is increasing evidence that to ensure a viable future for all, between 30 to 70% of nature must be protected—essentially, Nature needs half. Many government leaders and communities are working to set out and achieve ambitious targets to lock in protection for land and water around the world. In Canada, we have close to a quarter of the world’s wild forests and wetlands. That means the country has a critical role to play in protecting nature and putting an end to species extinctions. This starts with Canada’s commitment to double protected areas by 2020—ensuring 17% of land and inland waters and 10% of oceans are protected by that date. We are well on our way, with a new marine protected area announced at the government’s recent Nature Champion’s Summit. Over 80% of Canada’s nature remains unprotected. With the scale of the attacks against nature, citizen voices are needed to push for continued and stronger action and to create space for leaders to be bold, including scaling up support for Indigenous-led conservation We are racing against time but also racing for our lives. Nature Canada invites you to be a voice for nature, by joining our petition campaigns to protect wildlife. You can also find ways to work with community members to safeguard nature in your own neighbourhoods, like gardening with bird-friendly plants. Together we can stem the loss of species and put an end to the extinction of nature.

Media coverage of the report

Federal impact rules would exempt major oil and gas projects from environmental assessment while discouraging renewables
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Federal impact rules would exempt major oil and gas projects from environmental assessment while discouraging renewables

ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENCE, NATURE CANADA, AND THE QUEBEC CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL LAW For immediate release: May 1st, 2019 Federal impact rules would exempt major oil and gas projects from environmental assessment while discouraging renewables Environmental groups astonished that government will miss opportunity for action on climate change Ottawa, Ont. – Under proposed regulations released today, major oil and gas projects would be exempt from federal assessment under Bill C-69, the new environmental impact review law.  Notably, the draft project list has no provision for assessments to be triggered based on their potential climate impacts. “We are flabbergasted that the federal government has succumbed to lobbying by the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers to give proposed high-carbon projects such as in situ oil sands and fracking developments a free pass from federal review,” said Stephen Hazell, Director of Policy and General Counsel at Nature Canada. ”Impact assessment is an important tool to ensure that proposed projects incorporate best technologies to reduce carbon emissions, but the tool only works if you actually apply it across the board.” "Exempting high-carbon projects from federal assessment is ludicrous," says Julia Levin, Climate and Energy Program Manager at Environmental Defence Canada. "That’s like saying you’re going to study the environmental impact of road vehicles, and then giving a free pass to SUVs and transport trucks." The Designated Project List regulations identify categories of projects that are subject to the requirements of the proposed Impact Assessment Act, which forms a major part of Bill C-69 currently being debated by the Senate. The proposed regulations include large hydro and nuclear projects as well as various mines including oil sands mines. Bill C-69 requires consideration of a project’s contribution to Canada’s climate commitments, which is an important step in the right direction. “This is the first time climate change has been included in a federal assessment law – but it simply won’t be effective if industry lobbyists have their way and the biggest emitters get a pass,” said Karine Péloffy, legal counsel for the Quebec Center for Environmental Law. “The impacts of climate change are becoming more severe and the oil and gas industry is putting Canada’s climate targets out of reach - this is unacceptable.” “We are disappointed to see that there is currently no mechanism in the draft regulations to ensure that high carbon projects are federally assessed. Renewable energy projects will be discouraged and there will be fewer assessments of coal mines and pipelines. The federal government is in court defending its ability to regulate greenhouse gas emissions whilst seemingly giving up on its ability to assess them,” added Levin. “Ensuring equitable and efficient emissions reductions in all regions of the country requires the federal government be at the table when all new high-carbon projects are assessed.” The draft regulations are now open for public comment until May 31, 2019. Comments and submissions can be provided at the following website: www.impactassessmentregulations.ca. About ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENCE (www.environmentaldefence.ca): Environmental Defence is a leading Canadian advocacy organization that works with government, industry and individuals to defend clean water, a safe climate and healthy communities. About NATURE CANADA (naturecanda.ca) Nature Canada is the oldest national nature conservation charity in Canada. Nature Canada represents a network of over 90,000 members and supporters and more than 750 nature organizations. About the QUEBEC CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (www.cqde.org/en/) The Quebec Center for Environmental Law is Quebec’s only independent organization offering legal expertise on environmental issues to citizens, participating in public consultations on law reform and representing an environmental citizen perspective in public interest litigation before all courts. -30- For more information or to arrange an interview, please contact: Barbara Hayes, Communications Manager, Environmental Defence; 613-255-5724; bhayes@environmentaldefence.ca Stephen Hazell, Director of Policy & General Counsel, Nature Canada; 613-724-1908 (cell); 613-562-3447 ext. 240 (office); shazell@naturecanada.ca Karine Péloffy, Legal Counsel, Centre québécois du droit de l’environnement; 514-746-6597 (cell); k.peloffy@gmail.com; available in FR and ENG


Read this for more details on this decision.

The Rare Karner Blue Butterfly
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The Rare Karner Blue Butterfly

Celebrating Flowers & Pollinators

Flowers are the reason our pollinator friends have a purpose. Their symbiotic relationship creates beauty and biological diversity. The Karner Blue Butterfly is one species that once graced Southwestern Ontario but has since disappeared. The cause being the destruction of habitat and the loss of its only food supply: The Wild Lupine. We consistently praise the beauty of flowers, but it’s easy to forget why they are so important. With Wild Lupine preferring a sandy soil, and oak savannah, this flower, and these butterflies are narrowed to a specific ecosystem. The Great Lakes once flourished with both, but since the 1980’s, there hasn’t been a single sighting of the Karner Blue Butterfly in the wild.

The Karmer Blue

Common Name: Karner Blue Latin Name: Lycaeides melissa samuelis Status: Extirpated Range: Southwestern Ontario and the Great Lakes area Life Span: 5 days Size: tiny, 25 millimetre wing-span Photo is courtesy of Annie Spratt-Unsplash.com
Now extirpated from Canada, the Karner Blue is found only in captivity. There have been reintegration programs in New Hampshire, but without a consistent food supply, the success of these programs hang in the balance. These specialist butterflies live as adults for roughly five days. During these few days the Karner Blue will feed, mate and lay their eggs on the wild lupine leaves. They live the fast life but these butterflies are tiny, with 2.5cm wing spans. The males have deep blue wings with black edges and white outlines, where the females are so dark they’re nearly purple. Both the male and female are silvery grey on their undersides with orange crescent markings and black dots. Can you imagine seeing this blue butterfly in your backyard? Show all your plants a little TLC! Remember, without flowers there wouldn’t be chocolate! When you care for flowers, butterflies, bees and birds will surely thank you in their own way. And, who knows, maybe one day, the Karner Blue Butterfly will return and call Canada home again.

A Few Fun Facts

  • Eggs will be laid in the summer months and will over-winter on the leaves of the lupines, hatching the following summer to restart the entire circle of life.
  • In 1944 Vladimir Nabokov identified the Blue Karner for the first time.
  • The Larvae are the same colour as the Lupine leaves, bright green, so as to blend in more easily.

Photo is courtesy of Annie Spratt-Unsplash.com

Federal government misses opportunity to conserve nature and act on climate
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Federal government misses opportunity to conserve nature and act on climate

Under proposed regulations released on May 1, major oil and gas projects and many developments in federal protected areas would not be required by law to be assessed for their impacts on nature and climate. The proposed project list regulations implicitly reject proposals by nature and environmental groups to require that the following categories of projects be assessed by law:

  • Projects that produce large amounts of carbon pollution—whether oil sands projects, cement plants or others—to ensure potential climate impacts are assessed;
  • Development projects in federal protected areas such as National Parks and National Wildlife Areas (subject to exemptions for small projects); and
  • Major projects that require federal permits under the Fisheries Act or Navigable Waters Act.

What the proposed regulations mean for nature

Instead, the draft regulations make no provision for assessments triggered based on potential climate impacts. High-carbon projects such as in situ oil sands projects, fracking developments, and cement plants get a free pass from federal review. Now, fewer pipelines and coal mines would be assessed due to higher proposed thresholds. Higher thresholds are also proposed for offshore oil and gas exploration, uranium mines, nuclear power plants, metal mines, highways, and railways. This would mean that fewer, if any, federal assessments would be required for projects in these categories. New dams, water diversions, railways, and highways in National Parks would be required to be assessed, as would other physical works that are inconsistent with Parks Canada management plans (this latter condition would almost certainly mean that few if any new physical works in National Parks are assessed). Wind energy facilities with more than 10 wind turbines (roughly 20 megawatts) would be required to be assessed. But only huge hydroelectric projects producing more than 200 megawatts would be required to be assessed. The proposed regulations identify categories of projects that are subject to the requirements of the proposed Impact Assessment Act, which forms a major part of Bill C-69 currently being debated by the Senate. Nature Canada supports passage of Bill C-69 by the Senate by June as an improvement over the current statute.

the awkward moment when

It is indeed awkward that the current regulations brought into force by the Conservative government in 2012 are better for nature and climate than the regulations proposed by the Liberal government. The draft regulations are open for public comment until May 31, 2019. Comments and submissions can be provided at the following website: www.impactassessmentregulations.ca. Please let the government know that high-carbon polluting projects and developments in federal protected must be required to be assessed under the regulations.

Media coverage

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