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Your Voices for Nature Matter!
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Your Voices for Nature Matter!

[caption id="attachment_36239" align="alignleft" width="150"] Jodi Joy, the Director of Development and Conservation at Nature Canada.[/caption] Thank you to the thousands of Canadians like you who called for the government to invest in more wilderness protection for wildlife! Time and time again we are inspired by how deeply you care about nature and your commitment to protecting it. Using our collective voices is what makes a difference, and, as we saw with the 2018 Federal Budget, as a united front, we will influence change. Never doubt that your voice matters for wildlife and landscapes across Canada, and for all of us at Nature Canada! I always love receiving notes from our members because it reminds me how many Canadians are truly nurtured by nature, and the importance of nature for millions of lives across the country! Long-time members such as Dorothy from British-Columbia, make it clear to us why protecting nature is important. She exclaimed that “Caring for our natural environment is at the heart of the health and well-being of all Canadians. We need strong laws in place that put nature first.” And for the past few months we have been striving to do exactly that as we are making our voices heard and telling politicians to strengthen environmental laws across Canada. As Peter, a member since 1997, puts it plainly, “Inaction is the thief of time, start with small steps, they’ll lead to much larger, more ambitious commitments to protect nature.” Together, we have taken thousands of small steps forward for nature. There are many more steps to take, and your devoted support is something that will make the journey more enjoyable.


Here are a few other quotes from devoted Nature Canada members:

“Caring for our natural environment is at the heart of the health and well-being of all Canadians. We need strong laws in place that put nature first.” Dorothy from BC, who has been a member since 1999.

A plea from Patrick, a SK member since 2014 that we are happy to work for, “Please protect our valuable nature capital - it is our future.”

A final, parting thought from member of twenty-two years, Ruth in Ontario, “Many of us despair about what’s happening to our planet & its wildlife & our environment. Nature Canada gives us a spark of hope.”


Thank you to everyone that called for the government to invest in more wilderness protection for wildlife! Never doubt that your voices matter for nature, from coast, to coast, to coast!


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True North Strong and Green
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True North Strong and Green

[caption id="attachment_16434" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Jodi Joy Jodi Joy
Director of Development[/caption] I always love receiving notes and nature stories from our members! Here are some nature discovery stories shared recently which clearly shows how memorable nature can be and how our experiences and adventures shape us as a people. Nature is so core to our culture and identity as Canadians and no doubt you and other members hope we can stay true north strong and green for the next 150 years to come! Wishing everyone an enjoyable Canada 150! Hopefully spending time outdoors enjoying nature and making memories for more years to come. true-north-strong-and-green-member-quotes-april-2017-v2 If you have a nature wish or memory, you would like to share – email me today to share and you might be published in our upcoming calendar or future blog.  Thanks for caring about nature!

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“An interesting retirement”: Member Gordon Kelly’s adventures in forestry and duck banding
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“An interesting retirement”: Member Gordon Kelly’s adventures in forestry and duck banding

My family home was in Montreal, and my grandparents had a place in the Laurentians. It was 400 acres of woodland, but as a boy, I remember feeling like I could explore forever. So, I was brought up in two places. And I liked the wild better. I became interested in birds very early. At 13, in 1947, a friend and I found a local bird club, and we were the youngest members in history! Back then, there were rules about kids going to movies or lectures without an adult, so until we were 16 one of our moms had to come. I remember the thrill of going on field trips with experienced bird watchers, who helped me identify birds even just by song! At 16, I had a family member whose sister was married to a forester and I thought that sounded just amazing. I went for an interview when I was 16, but I couldn't be hired for a summer job until I was 17. I was hired that summer and sent to the farthest operation in the St. Maurice Division called Cooper Lake, situated at the headwaters of the Nottaway River which flows into James Bay. [caption id="attachment_33342" align="alignright" width="300" class="right "]Fall folliage in field next to the La Croche river Fall foliage in field next to the La Croche river. Photo by Gordon Kelly[/caption] It was my first time in the Boreal Forest. 1951, Virgin forest, and logging was just beginning. The black spruce...unbelievable. It was then I decided to become a Forester. In 1987, with my son, we purchased our woodlot of 225-acres. There were some red pine plantations on the property dating back to the early 1960s. We have since added another 225-acres for a total of 450 which we manage with my son and grandson who are also Foresters. I can't tell you what it means to me, to my family. It's the most beautiful place, full of memories and stories. And about 20 years ago back in 1996, not far from my house, I was walking on a trail near a swampy area, very overgrown. I noticed a pair of Wood Ducks. As I went exploring, I realized it was an old beaver pond, and that I could pull out some of the alders and other growth. One of my sons, who today manages migratory bird banding stations in the Yukon, at the time was learning to band at Long Point. Word spread and I was contacted by a biologist who asked me to start banding. [caption id="attachment_33345" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of Gordon Kelly releasing a Wood Duck Gordon Kelly releasing a Wood Duck[/caption] On average, we band 155 ducks per year, some that return. I had one last year that I banded five years ago! And one year we had 255 ducks! It's been an interesting and rewarding retirement indeed! Why do I support Nature Canada? Because education is so important. You see it mostly in the kids, but really so many Canadians don't get out in nature. We've become disconnected. We can't just continue to exploit nature without consequences. I'm a Guardian of Nature monthly donor, and I know that my regular support makes a difference. It means Nature Canada can get people more involved in nature, in making citizens and our governments more aware of the importance of nature conservation.

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Working diligently: Small efforts that go a long way!
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Working diligently: Small efforts that go a long way!

By: Jennifer Siviero, Donor Communications and Stewardship Coordinator [caption id="attachment_30830" align="alignright" width="275"] Wesley Dearham is a retired writer-copy editor for the Ottawa Citizen, an amateur musician, avid traveler and dabbling naturalist.[/caption] From a young age Wesley Dearham was always drawn to the splendor of inland valleys, rugged mountain ranges, seaside plains, extensive coastline and vast oceans that surrounded him in Cape Town, South Africa where he was born. This sense of wonderment with nature would follow him as he moved to Alliston, Ontario shortly after immigrating to Canada with his family in his early years. Through activities like hiking, camping, swimming, and cross-country skiing on his new Canadian landscape, Wesley’s fondness for nature developed into a true love and appreciation for Canadian nature through all of its seasons. Wesley says he has learned to appreciate all of the diverse and unique parts of Canada. “I recognize how Canada differs in a natural sense to almost everywhere else,” said Wesley as he reflected on family camping trips to Algonquin Park, and time spent with his family relaxing, enjoying and appreciating the great beauty of the Midland area near Georgian Bay, amazed by the uniqueness of Canada’s “in-land ocean”, the Great Lakes. But, he knows that with great appreciation for Canadian nature comes the responsibility to protect it. “We can’t take for granted what we have, we can’t let it be challenged or compromised” says Wesley. “We need to find a balance and be sure that what we have, we preserve.” He and his family do their part to protect Canadian nature by preserving the areas they use most at their family cottage, a legacy of his in-laws, in the Laurentians Mountains north of Montreal. Wesley takes pride in his children's and his 7 year old grandson's love for nature; he, his family and their community stand to protect their lake and with a fragile ecosystem through environmentally minded rules like banning certain types of motor boats on the lake and activities on land. Wesley says small efforts like these go a long way when ensuring the protection and preservation of natural areas. Read here for more tips to ensure healthy lakes and shorelines. dearham-3“Ultimately, everything is dependent on our natural environment, and the natural environment needs supporters,” says Wesley. “Supporting organizations that make nature a priority is a great way to do that.” Wesley has been a supporter of Nature Canada since 1995 and says that while there are many organizations that one can choose to support, Nature Canada is the option that worked best for him as Nature Canada makes, “efforts at the federal level to protect ecosystems, endangered and threatened species, and water and air quality,” and ensures that, “national parks and natural features are a priority.” He hopes that we continue to, “make sure we keep adding as much as we can to preserved areas.” Read more about more protected areas for Canada. Now in his retirement, Wesley is an avid traveler and throughout his travels he often reflects on the challenges faced by other countries and how they are relatable to the challenges faced in Canada. “It’s so easy to see that some species are so close to extinction, if we don’t pay attention. We must be aware of challenges like climate change and its effects on our world,” he says. And while he doesn’t believe that Canada is doing a bad job at protecting natural areas compared to other places in the world, he is adamant that there is much room for improvement. “There are countries who are struggling with environmental issues, and who are under more pressures than ours,” says Wesley. “We have our own challenges and we must work diligently.” Like Wesley, you too can help us work diligently to protect and preserve Canada's nature by giving a gift today! You can also follow these links to read more about Nature Canada’s work with threatened and endangered species, parks and protected areas, and strengthening environmental laws  

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Our Members Never Cease to Inspire and Amaze Me
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Our Members Never Cease to Inspire and Amaze Me

[caption id="attachment_21828" align="alignleft" width="150"]Jodi and Noah Jodi Joy
Director of Development and Communications[/caption] Our members never cease to inspire and amaze me. I always feel so blessed when chatting with our members about how nature has shaped their lives, the joys they have experience spending time outdoors in nature and why they feel it’s so important to support Nature Canada’s work. Some common threads I’ve heard time and again: whether growing up on the farm and nature was all around them and therefore is part of who they are and why they appreciate and respect it.  Or they lived in the city but their parents took them hand-in-hand to teach them about nature and then they did the same to pass their nature ethic onto their kids or grandkids too! You might enjoy these stories shared recently:

I grew up in a small village and looking back it is astounding the freedom we had as children – fields, woods, streams – nature was our constant companion. And what a privilege and joy to have lived in that place and time. Keep up the good work! Janet, ON, Member for 40 years

[caption id="attachment_30713" align="alignright" width="300"]Image of a Pink Lady's Slipper Pink Lady's Slipper[/caption]

My earliest memory is my Mother taking me across the fields to Lady Slippers in bloom. No picking. We could just sit and look at them and talk about them and it made us happy. Norma, SK, Member since 1998

I grew up on the edge of a Forest with a Father who knew the names of wildflowers. At the beginning of WWII, I was not evacuated so I spent time walking my dog and learning the names of trees and shrubs too. I had a brilliant Biology teacher who loved botany and took us on field trips.  I have never stopped loving nature! Joan, ON, Member since 2000

My love of nature was inspired by my mother – still have the bird feeder hanging in our backyard filled with bird seed and love to hear singing of songbirds – which reminds me of her. Mary, ON, Member since 2005

Ever since I was a kid, I have LOVED the outdoors and spent all my life hiking in the wilderness.  I married in my 40s and taught my husband how wonderful hiking is and together we have walked many miles. And even though I am 80 and arthritis stops my walking now, what incredible memories my husband and I share together! Joyce, ON, Member since 2000

And I spoke with Margaret Taylor this week to thank her for kind support and heard: [caption id="attachment_30714" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of Red Breasted Nuthatch Red Breasted Nuthatch[/caption] Since a tiny toddler in a small stroller, her mother and father took her to the woods and taught her to “love all nature, the flowers, the birds, just everything in those woods”.  When she grew up, she married a man who loved nature as much as she did – camping out in Temagami Forest for their honeymoon.  Margaret told me she’s been so fortunate to live by nature all her life – all 101 years of it, residing near the Niagara escarpment and the Dundas marsh. She laughed as she said: “It’s just part of me! I just love God’s beautiful world. And I am grateful that I can still enjoy the garden and all the wildlife that abounds. And I’m very thankful that groups like Nature Canada are working to protect something so important to me and others.” At this special time of the year, we want to say Thank You to all our members who care so dearly about nature and trust in our efforts to save wilderness and defend wildlife.

Here’s to a bright new year full of happiness and prosperity in 2017!

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