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Engagement Organizing Case Studies

Nature Canada / The Nature Network Engagement Program / Engagement Organizing Case Studies

Green Teams Of Canada

Mastering The Volunteer Experience

Lyda Salatian picked up the donated muffins for the first Green Teams event at Campbell Valley Regional Park near Vancouver, but feared that nobody would show up. Several years later, thousands of people have driven her fears away by volunteering at hundreds of such events and inspiring the creation of the charity Green Teams of Canada with chapters in the Lower Mainland and Victoria.

“People want to get out in nature, but sometimes need a reason for doing so,” says Lyda. People also want to feel like they are contributing, so Green Teams partners with local parks, nature groups, land conservancies, and non-profit farms to do things like remove invasive species, do beach cleanups, and plant vegetables.

Read the full article here.


A Passport To Success

Couchiching Restructures Its Engagement

Mark Bisset had a problem.

Each year his organization – the Couchiching Conservancy located near Lake Simcoe, Ontario – put on a big nature festival. It was a major undertaking for a relatively small group of people, needing significant amounts of time and resources. In early years it seemed worth it, but over time attendance shrank. The cost-benefit was no longer worth it.

The Conservancy still wanted to get people out on its properties, appreciating nature and engaging with its organization. So, it simplified things, and came up with a great package – a “passport” to nature.

Read the full article here.


Losing Control And Gaining Ground In New Brunswick

Nature Trust Embraces Engagement Organizing

Since its founding in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick has historically been run through grassroots efforts, with volunteers incorporating the organization to conserve and steward critical natural areas of New Brunswick and to educate New Brunswickers about the importance of these spaces.

Prior to 1992, all Nature Trust work, including volunteer coordination, preserve acquisition and communication, was done in private homes and offices until a dedicated office space was found, which brought about growth in both volunteer and staff capacity.

Read the full article here.


 

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