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Bird Tweet of the Week: Snow Bunting
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Snow Bunting

Known collectively as a ‘drift’, snow buntings have the northernmost winter range of any passerine, or perching bird, other than the Common Raven, and they have feathered tarsi, or ankle areas, which help them retain crucial body heat in the cold. [caption id="attachment_14598" align="alignleft" width="300"]snow bunting Snow Bunting[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday November 23, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Brant
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Brant

Although the Brant could be considered the doppelgänger of the Canada Goose, Brant fly in a straight line formation. [caption id="attachment_14595" align="alignleft" width="300"]brant Brant. Photographed by BJ Stacey[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. This episode aired on Saturday November 16, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Dunlin
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Dunlin

Known collectively as a ‘fling’ of Dunlins, this medium-size sandpiper is a circumpolar breeder that is recognized by birders throughout the northern hemisphere. [caption id="attachment_14590" align="alignleft" width="300"]Dunlin Dunlin[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday November 9, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Pileated Woodpecker
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Pileated Woodpecker

The Pileated Woodpecker is a year-round resident of our region that, despite its size, nests in large cavities it excavates itself in trees – often standing dead trees. [caption id="attachment_14586" align="alignleft" width="199"]Pileated Woodpecker Pileated Woodpecker. Photographed by BJ Stacey[/caption]   Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Catch up on past episode here on our website. This episode aired on Saturday November 2, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Peregrine Falcon
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Peregrine Falcon

Since being very nearly wiped-out in the 1950s and 60s due to the widespread use of the pesticide DDT, this crow-sized bird has made a dramatic comeback across North America. [caption id="attachment_14583" align="alignleft" width="200"]Peregrine falcon Peregrine falcon[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday October 26, 2013

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Bird Tweet of the Week: Rusty Blackbird
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Rusty Blackbird

As its name suggests, the Rusty Blackbird can be considered rusty in two respects: first because of its metallic song and second because of the rust-coloured plumage of the female and non-breeding males. [caption id="attachment_14580" align="alignleft" width="200"]rusty blackbird Rusty Blackbird. Photographed by Jeff Nadler[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday October 19, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Northern Saw-Whet Owl
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Northern Saw-Whet Owl

The common name Saw-whet Owl comes from the bird’s whine-like call that sounds like the sharpening, or whetting, of a handsaw blade. [audio mp3="http://naturecanada.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/Sequence-01_1.mp3"][/audio]   [caption id="attachment_14577" align="alignleft" width="200"]northern saw-whet owl Northern Saw-Whet Owl. Photographed by Bob Bodge[/caption]   Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday October 12, 2013      

Bird Tweet of the Week: Yellow-Rumped Warbler
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Yellow-Rumped Warbler

He species is known for its habit of migrating in large groups that will descend on fruit-bearing bushes in the fall creating a cacophony of chipping sounds and fleeting flashes of yellow. [caption id="attachment_14574" align="alignleft" width="300"]yellow-rumped warbler Yellow-Rumped Warbler. Photographed by Marv Elliott[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday October 5, 2013

Bird Tweet of the Week: Ring-Billed Gull
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Ring-Billed Gull

This is just one of four gulls found locally throughout the year, and this medium sized gull actually migrates. [caption id="attachment_14571" align="alignleft" width="300"]ring-billed gull Ring-Billed Gull. Photographed by Thomas McKinnon[/caption] Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio's In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada's Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to "Bird Tweet of the Week" on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website This episode aired on Saturday September 28, 2013

Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake
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Fall BioBlitz at Mud Lake

[two_third]Nature Canada’s first ever Fall BioBlitz was a huge success! We were joined by over 200 citizens of the national capital region who accompanied local expert naturalists on guided walks where they learned to identify plants, birds, amphibians, reptiles and more! A BioBlitz can take many forms, but is generally an intense 24 hour survey of a location with a mission to identify as many living things as possible at the site. With the help of naturalists and citizen investigators we managed to identify a total of 295 species, at least four of which are considered species at risk: the Common Nighthawk, the Rusty Blackbird,the Butternut tree and the Snapping Turtle. The Fall BioBlitz is part of a larger effort to learn more about the state of local biodiversity and catalogue changes over time in population patterns. Mud Lake is considered by many to be a wilderness gem in the heart of our busy city and is found within the Lac Deschênes- Ottawa River Important Bird Area. It was the perfect location for such an inventory. Easy to get to and containing various habitats in a confined area, Mud Lake is an ideal spot to connect to nature in your own backyard. Each walk focused on a particular group of plants or animals. Simple kitchen items revealed a world of tiny living things which thrive in complex communities, often unnoticed, in water. An eye opening experience for many. An ultraviolet light focused on a white sheet called-in night-flying insects for close examination after the sun had set. Birders, expert and aspiring, rose early to search out common and rare species. We even got an up close look at snapping turtles that were making their way from the nest to the water. All in all it was a very exciting 24 hours! We hope you can join us for the next BioBlitz at Mud Lake in June 2014. We would like to thank everyone who came out to help us survey the area, in particular all the fantastic local naturalists who shared their expertise and helped to make the day such a resounding success! Botany experts – Serguei Ponomarenko, Zoe Pachen, Cassandra Robillard Insect experts –Henri Goulet, Tara Conroy Avian experts - Gillian Shields, Carlos Barbery, Emily Bird Reptile and amphibian experts – Julie Chateauvert, William Halliday, Rachel Thibodeau General experts – Jeff Skevington, Michelle Locke We would also like to thank our funders:

Here is an overview of what we found at during our Fall BioBlitz: Bird Species - 91 Amphibian and Reptile Species - 6 Mammal Species - 8 Tree Species - 37 Shrubs and Flowering Plants - 57 Other Plant Species (including Fungi) - 14 Beetle Species - 6 Fly Species - 22 Swaflies, Bees, Wasps and Ants - 17 Butterflies and Moths - 8 Dragonflies and Damsleflies - 8 other Insect Species - 21 [/two_third] [one_third_last] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Volunteer bird watchers Photo Credit: Rocky Chan[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Image of volunteers Exploring aquatic macro-invertebrates with a kitchen strainer and a tub.[/caption] [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="320"]Image of a young snapping turtle Young snapping turtle.[/caption] [/one_third_last]

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