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Who are the Women for Nature?
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Who are the Women for Nature?

[caption id="attachment_28468" align="alignright" width="150"]Image of Cedar Swan Cedar Swan, Women for Nature[/caption] [caption id="attachment_14284" align="alignleft" width="150"]Picture of Dawn Bazely Dawn Bazely, Women for Nature[/caption] This blog is written by Women for Nature member Dawn Bazely. Cedar Swan, CEO of Adventure Canada I had a chance to interview fellow Woman for Nature, Cedar Swan, about her career, and her environmental philosophy while watching this CEO in action on her company, Adventure Canada’s Mighty St. Lawrence cruise, as the Ocean Endeavour sailed from Quebec City to St. John’s from June 1-10 2016. I was already familiar with the Swan family business, through my husband, Dr. Peter Ewins of WWF Canada, so I was thrilled to be invited to join the Adventure Canada Resource Team as a naturalist. Along with other expert resource staff, I gave talks about, and interpreted the region’s rich biodiversity, culture and history. As we visited sites along the St. Lawrence River and in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, I discovered that many of the passengers were veterans of Adventure Canada expedition cruises, who love these trips and keep coming back for more. Cedar is both a company president, and a mum of two young daughters: Charlotte (b. 2013), and Islay (b. 2015). Islay accompanied Cedar on the cruise! Adventure Canada is truly a family business. Cedar, along with sister, Alana Faber (VP Operations), and brother, Matthew James Swan (Director of Business Development) are its 2nd generation leadership. Their dad, Matthew, founded the business in 1987, with his brother, Bill Swan and friend, Dave Freeze. Cedar’s partner, Jason Edmunds, Alana’s husband, Brian Faber and Matthew James’ partner Devon all work in the company! Other 2nd generation members involved with Adventure Canada include founder, Dave Freeze’s sons Daniel and Dawson. The entire enterprise has a real family feel that extends to the guests! [one_third] [caption id="attachment_28469" align="alignnone" width="300"]Image of Cedar Swan and niece Cedar and niece, Leah on board Ocean Endeavour. Leah’s mum is Cedar’s sister, Alana Faber[/caption] [/one_third] [one_third] [caption id="attachment_28471" align="alignnone" width="300"]Image of Matthew James Cedar’s brother, Matthew James, right, with Dawson Freeze (left) son of the 3rd Adventure Canada founder, Dave Freeze, in a zodiac.[/caption] [/one_third] [one_third_last] [caption id="attachment_28472" align="alignnone" width="300"]Image of people at Cheticamp, Cape Breton Cedar with daughter, Islay in the background, and brother, Matthew James, along with traditional French & Quebecois musician/musicologist, Antoine Pigeon-Bourque and Dr. Pete Ewins of WWF Canada, at Cheticamp, Cape Breton.[/caption] [/one_third_last] What inspired you to become a Woman for Nature? Cedar was inspired to become one of Nature Canada’s Women for Nature, first and foremost, because she believes in Nature Canada’s mission. Cedar sees enormous value in connecting people to nature: “If I can help to facilitate these connections, then this work has meaning for me.” [caption id="attachment_28474" align="alignright" width="300"]Image of people entering a boat Expedition cruising allows people with a yearning to see wild places to experience them in a unique way: zodiacs with Cape Breton Highlands NP staff[/caption] Cedar explained, that from a personal perspective, she is also interested in, and enjoys the idea of connecting with other women who are not only passionate about conservation and the natural world, but who also have the means and capacity to take some kind of concrete, transformative action on this front. Cedar’s philosophy about nature and the environment and the importance of connecting people with nature draws inspiration from many different sources, though she credits her rural upbringing with playing a major role in shaping her outlook. She grew up in Beachburg, Renfrew County, surrounded by farms, and nature. Her father, Matthew, worked as a rafting guide when she was young, and Cedar enjoyed wilderness activities from an early age. These experiences had an important influence on her philosophy. Who were your mentors or inspiration, and what books have inspired you? Cedar’s uncle, Bill Swan, was very influential in shaping her approach to sustainability and the environment. [caption id="attachment_28476" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of people in Cape Breton Highlands Bill Swan (red shirt, center) in Cape Breton Highlands NP[/caption] “I was 7 when my father, my uncle and their friend, Dave Freeze started Adventure Canada. Bill was working in Kootenay Mountains National Park. We spent a lot of time in the park and that was my first exposure to understanding the environment as a science. Bill’s dedication and passion for sustainability and alternative energy continues to inspire me.” Stefan Kindberg, a family friend, who was involved with Adventure Canada from its early years, has known Cedar from a young age. Cedar credits him with instilling in her a passion for going out to the edge of the world to explore isolated environments. At these edges, she is inspired by the feeling that the human species is a small part of a bigger picture. One book that particularly resonates with Cedar, is the novel, Sweetland, which is about a one of Newfoundland’s South Shore communities facing resettlement, and the old man who is not going to leave. Sweetland’s Canadian author, Michael Crummey has been a resource staff person on Adventure Canada cruises. The novel, says Cedar, “reminds us of the importance of the sense of place to a person’s identity and cultural identity… the importance of land. Sweetland also reminds us that many people are being cut off from their sense of place. This is perhaps the biggest challenge for conservation: how people are losing their physical connections to nature.” What advice would you give to future women for nature leaders? I would advise young women to not let yourself be intimidated by other people. Don’t be afraid to claim your space, even when, in my case, being surrounded by the larger corporate world of adventure travel. Instead, she encourages young women leaders to find inspiration from, and learn from these people and groups. Find ways and means of using them as a platform or springboard for developing your skills based on the inspiration and learning that you get. When Cedar has a rare spare moment, she tries to catch up with Game of Thrones. “I love this show for its unpredictability! No character is safe.” She is also a fan of the book and TV series, Outlander, because it’s set in Scotland, which she loves. Cedar started reading the series as a teenager and loves it. Her family roots are in Scotland, and she enjoys the wilderness of the highlands. [caption id="attachment_28477" align="aligncenter" width="671"]P8 Cedar thanks Adventure Canada passengers Cedar thanks the Mighty St. Lawrence Cruise passengers on Day 10, in St Pierre et Miquelon.[/caption]

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Sable Island – The Graveyard of the Atlantic (Part Two)
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Sable Island – The Graveyard of the Atlantic (Part Two)

[caption id="attachment_21100" align="alignleft" width="150"]image of sandy sharkey Sandy Sharkey - Photographer[/caption] This blog is written by Women for Nature Member Sandy Sharkey.  How did the horses get there?  The romantic notion is that the horses swam to the island from ships wrecked on sandbars, but today’s Sable Island horses are most likely the descendants of horses that were seized during the Acadian expulsion from Nova Scotia in the 1700’s. Acadian horses were brought to the island to help build a lifesaving station and eventually they returned to a wild state. When the government gave Sable Island the status of ‘National Park Reserve’, many Canadians worried that the island would be overrun with tourists.  I too had visions of newly built accommodations, perhaps a restaurant or two, and crowds trying to get selfies with the wild horses. Thankfully, nothing could be further from the truth. Parks Canada’s new mandate to welcome visitors to the island while at the same time protecting the delicate environment led to an effective symbiotic relationship with Adventure Canada. With camera gear, bottled water and hiking boots packed, it was time to set foot on Canada’s iconic Sable Island. [caption id="attachment_28443" align="alignright" width="300"]Image of a Grey Seal by Sandy Sharkey Grey Seal by Sandy Sharkey[/caption] From the Ocean Endeavour’s anchorage one mile from shore, we climbed into Zodiac boats and landed on the southern beach. Nearby, a large grey seal lay on its side and slowly waved a flipper at us, and we couldn’t help but smile at this lazy welcoming committee. My husband Rob and I joined a small hiking group lead by a Parks Canada guide with Adventure Canada resource photographer Mike Beedell in tow. We knew the rules:  there would be limited time on the island, and we were to hike only on sand or established horse trails so as not to disturb the delicate foliage which also provided shelter for breeding birds. And, if we encountered wild horses, we needed to respect the minimum distance of sixty metres. The wild horses appeared almost immediately.  Two bachelor stallions descended from a grassy ridge to cross the beach and walk along the surf, paying us no attention whatsoever. It was a fleeting moment, the stallions turning back to the ridge, giving chase and disappearing over the hill.  Freedom. Wild. Raw. Nature. We hiked through a meadow of marram grass, a thick stemmed grass that is the primary source of food for wild horses.  Ascending Bald Dune, at twenty-eight metres the highest point on the island, the view is breathtaking: a freshwater pond dotted with water lilies, a mix of bayberries and blueberries skirting horse trails, grassy ridges, a glimpse of the northern beach with hundreds of grey seals, and a family band of wild horses. Arctic Terns and Herring Gulls flew overhead and the occasional sighting of the Ipswich Sparrow was especially rewarding, as this diminutive breed of sparrow is known to breed only on Sable Island. [caption id="attachment_28449" align="alignleft" width="354"]Image of wild mare and foal Wild Mare and Foal by Sandy Sharkey[/caption] We kept our distance as we approached the wild horse family band. Grazing quietly were two mares, still shedding winter coats, a yearling colt and a tiny foal who entertained us with his game of ‘peekabo’ behind his mother’s nuzzle. A magnificent stallion with a long tangled mane kept a watchful eye over his family. We photographed the horses, the tiny flowers, the birds, the seals, the sand dunes. We stood still. We took it all in, joyous, exhilarated, alive. We were experiencing one of the most beautiful places in the world. As we hiked back to the south beach and climbed into the waiting Zodiac, I couldn’t help but notice my footprints in the sand.  And with one gust of wind, they disappeared. Zero impact by mankind.  Like we were never there. Exactly as it should be. In Canada, we host a model for nature to be envied around the world. Wild, natural. Sable Island. It is truly fitting that the island is shaped like a smile. Sable Island.  It exists.  Follow your dreams and visit. To find out more about how you can get to Sable Island, email sandysharkey@rocketmail.com

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Sable Island – The Graveyard of the Atlantic
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Sable Island – The Graveyard of the Atlantic

[caption id="attachment_21100" align="alignleft" width="150"]image of sandy sharkey Sandy Sharkey - Photographer[/caption]  This blog is written by Women for Nature Member Sandy Sharkey. 

‘It is far better to experience a place just once than to hear about it a thousand times’ ~ Mongolian saying
Sable Island. ‘The graveyard of the sea’. So steeped in Canadian lore that when I was a kid, I didn’t think Sable Island actually existed. [caption id="attachment_28446" align="alignright" width="300"]An Ipswich Sparrow by Sandy Sharkey. An Ipswich Sparrow by Sandy Sharkey.[/caption] On my eighth birthday, I unwrapped a book about Sable Island. Page after page offered grainy black and white photos of shipwrecks, sky high sand dunes and fierce ocean swells bundled with tales of human struggle.  But, it was the Sable Island horses that really caught my attention. Manes flowing in the wind, stallions clashing with each other atop seaside cliffs, herds thundering through the surf. This was the stuff of fiction. But of course, Sable Island exists. The stories of the shipwrecks, the sand dunes, the horses. All true. Like so many Canadians, it became my lifelong dream to visit this magical and mystical slice of geography. Three hundred kilometres east of Halifax in the Atlantic Ocean, Sable Island sits in the path of some of the most treacherous currents in the world. The island’s ‘smile’ shape belies its historical moniker, ‘Graveyard of the Atlantic’, with over three hundred and fifty ships known to have perished off Sable’s sandy shores. Home to just a handful of meteorologists, scientific researchers, and Parks Canada staff, Sable Island is an irresistible dream for a nature lover. Sand dunes shelter the island’s interior where grassy fields and freshwater ponds teem with life. Over three hundred and fifty species of birds have been recorded on the island. It also supports the world’s largest breeding colony of fifty thousand grey seals. But, if there was a Sable Island wildlife popularity contest, the iconic wild horses would win hands down. [caption id="attachment_28445" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of horses on a sand dune Horses on Sable Island. By Sandy Sharkey[/caption] The ever-shifting sands, fog, and unpredictable ocean swells have always made getting to Sable Island difficult, but that would change. In December 2013, the Canadian government officially declared Sable Island as Canada’s forty-third National Park Reserve.  Known for leading expeditions to the arctic, Canadian company ‘Adventure Canada’ was chosen to bring travellers to the land of horses and seals.  This past June, my husband Rob and I joined enthusiastic adventurers and nature lovers aboard the ship Ocean Endeavour, and under sunny skies we sailed out of St John’s harbour, past a postcard iceberg, and out to sea for our final destination. As we sailed the Atlantic Ocean over the next thirty-six hours we were treated to enlightening presentations by scientists, writers, and photographers. Topics included climate, wildlife and survival on the island. Sandy's story continues here
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Birding in James Bay
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Birding in James Bay

[caption id="attachment_16448" align="alignleft" width="150"]Ted Cheskey Ted Cheskey, Senior Conservation Manager[/caption] Last summer, Nature Canada led an expedition to Charlton Island in James Bay in the Cree Nation of Waskaganish's traditional territory for 6 days and had observed over 10,000 shorebirds, including nearly 100 endangered Red Knots and new breeding records for the threatened Horned Grebe. This year, we are returning for 10 days with a bigger crew to do more thorough searches! Charlton Island is a 3 hour boat trip through Rupert Bay, and is situated in the south eastern side of James Bay. It has a rich and amazing history, but is also an incredible place for wildlife. In addition to very large numbers of shorebirds, Charlton is regularly visited by Polar Bears and Walruses, who are occasionally observed on the beaches. Nature Canada's senior manager Ted Cheskey will be accompanied by Marc Antoine Montpetit, an expert birder from Mont Laurier, Quebec, and five local team members including Garry Salt and Clayton Jolly, both returning from last year's expedition, and new members Jordan Rabbitskin and Jeremy Stevens. Elder Bill Jolly and Clayton will be the boat pilots and local guides. [caption id="attachment_28425" align="aligncenter" width="664"]Image of Workshop with Cree Nation of Waskaganish Workshop with Cree Nation of Waskaganish. Photo by Ted Cheskey.[/caption] One exciting additional activity to this year will be installation of a MOTUS wildlife tracking tower on the island. Garry Salt will oversee the installation of the tower on Charlton, after helping with installation at the Waskaganish CTA office last week. The MOTUS tower antennas receive signals from any animal carrying a nanotag - a tiny transmitter that sends pulse of information about the identity of the animal carrying it. These antennas have the ability to detect a signal from up to 15 kilometres away! The tags used in this project have been deployed on shorebirds on the western coast of James Bay, as well as many other species of birds elsewhere in the Americas. [caption id="attachment_28426" align="aligncenter" width="404"]Image of a MOTUS Tower Ted and Marc Antoine Montpetit at the new MOTUS tower at the Waskaganish CTA office.[/caption] The people in Waskaganish who are participating or aware of this project are very excited about the MOTUS system and learning what bird are coming into their territory!

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Planting Seeds Today for Nature Tomorrow
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Planting Seeds Today for Nature Tomorrow

[caption id="attachment_21828" align="alignleft" width="150"]Jodi and Noah Jodi Joy
Director of Development and Communications[/caption] Dan and Donna’s love for nature grew like one of their cherished trees—slowly, naturally and gracefully. Together, they have spent 40 years planting trees on their property outside Clinton, Ontario. “We have 72 different types of trees here, and really each one is spectacular,” Dan says. “We think of people who helped us plant our trees, and it makes it even more special. Some are memorial trees for people who have come and gone. Others just remind us of friends or family and it makes us smile.” Dan adds, “I volunteered as a big brother and he and I planted some, so I go by and think about him. He’s about 40 now, with 2 beautiful kids.” “When we moved here, this was just an open field with very little wildlife. We have created different habitats—a hardwood zone, little open meadows, a pond area. Mother Nature has come to us!” They built wooden duck boxes—and were delighted when one box had 23 ducklings. “It was like a clown car!” Dan laughs. The next fall, it became home for a Screech Owl, and last year it brought a mate and they nested. Planting wildflowers has been a joyful experience too, and their meadows of goldenrod and milkweed provide habitat for pollinators. [caption id="attachment_28339" align="alignright" width="375"]Image of members Dan and Donna Taylor[/caption] Donna and Dan both actively volunteer with local groups. “She’s doing things and I’m opposing things,” Dan says with a smile. “I’m proud of her work on the local stewardship council, helping protect watersheds and public education programs. And I know she’s proud of me for my letter-writing campaigns and speaking out against development projects that harm nature.” “We believe that we have a responsibility to act for nature. We must protect endangered species, and to do that, we must protect habitat. And it’s crucial to keep connecting youth with nature—if people don’t understand what they are going to miss, we won’t save it!”

“We believe that we have a responsibility to act for nature.”
“And we also believe that part of taking action is giving. We’ve been Nature Canada supporters for a long time. For years, this organization has been on the front lines defending nature. They need funding. And we trust them to do good work. We can see for ourselves that Nature Canada gets victories for the things we value.” If you are interested in having a confidential discussion about your gifts to Nature Canada, and how your values can live on with a gift to nature in your Will, I would love to hear from you. Contact me at jjoy@naturecanada.ca or 1-800-267-4088 ext. 239. Thank you!
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Retiring Old Rail Tanker Cars is Good But  . . .
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Retiring Old Rail Tanker Cars is Good But . . .

[caption id="attachment_22697" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Stephen Hazell Stephen Hazell
Director of Conservation
and General Counsel[/caption] Nature Canada congratulates Transport Minister Marc Garneau on the government’s decision on July 25th to retire the older DOT-111 rail tanker cars early. These cars were involved in the deadly Lac-Megantic tragedy, as well as the Lake Wabamun bunker oil spill and the Cheakamus River caustic soda spill. But the transport of oil and other dangerous goods by rail will still be too hazardous to protect public safety and nature even with the retirement of the DOT-111 cars on November 1; there are over 100 incidents involving dangerous goods every year in Canada. Nature Canada’s view is that rail transport of dangerous needs to be regulated by an independent regulatory body, not a government department that is too often subject to political and bureaucratic pressures. A first start would be to require federal environmental assessments for all new rail infrastructure projects for transporting oil and gas. (Yes, you are perhaps surprised that this is not the case already!)

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Bird Tweet of the Week: Clay-coloured Sparrow
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Clay-coloured Sparrow

[caption id="attachment_28406" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of a Clay-coloured Sparrow Photo from Flickr, Francesco Veronesi[/caption] The Clay-coloured Sparrow behaves a bit differently compared to other North American birds when it comes to breeding. For starters, this species uses different breeding and foraging habitats that allows the male to defend a breeding territory that is quite a bit smaller than the territories of other sparrows. Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Catch up on past episode here on our website. This episode aired on Saturday July 23rd, 2016. [button link="http://naturecanada.ca/what-we-do/naturehood/bird-e-book-series/" size="medium" target="_self" icon="leaf" color="blue" lightbox="false"]Catch up on facts about both backyard and at-risk birds with our new e-Book series![/button]

From Starfish to Orca Whales, Marine Life at East Point, Saturna Island
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From Starfish to Orca Whales, Marine Life at East Point, Saturna Island

[caption id="attachment_28395" align="alignleft" width="150"]Image of Sofia Osborne Sofia Osborne, Guest Blogger[/caption]

This blog was written by guest blogger Sofia Osborne.

On an island of only about 350 people, Canada Parks Day on July 16 at East Point was downright crowded. But it makes sense. What better place to celebrate the beauty of nature than a hub for sea lions, seals, harbour porpoises, and whales?

About half of Saturna Island, the most eastern of the Gulf Islands off the coast of British Columbia, is protected as parks. East Point, part of the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, is a gentle slope covered in golden grass. It’s one of the best land based points for whale watching, particularly Orcas. The Southern Resident Orcas are regular visitors, as well are their mammal eating counterparts the Biggs, or Transient, Orcas. They often pass by incredibly close to the rocks, fishing and breaching.

Extending off the point is Boiling Reef, where currents criss-cross and Harbour Seals swim lazily, sometimes scrambling up onto the rocks when Transient Orcas are near. At the end of the point is a gull-covered rock monopolized by roaring Steller and California Sea Lions in the winter. If that’s not enough sea life for you, you might see the small dorsal fin of a Harbour Porpoise cutting through the water.

[caption id="attachment_28399" align="alignright" width="225"]Image of ocean creatures brought from the ocean floor Photo of sea creatures on display on Shell Beach. By Sofia Osborne[/caption]

In this marine mammal paradise it’s easy to overlook what lies beneath the waves. But on Canada Parks Day, the Saturna Island Marine Research and Education Society (SIMRES) brought a team of divers out for their annual Intertidal Safari, focusing on the animals that don’t get as much recognition. The ocean floor divers had carefully plucked crabs, sea cucumbers, starfish, and more, bringing them to tanks on Shell Beach. Kids and adults alike were encouraged to connect with the invertebrates, touching the tooth-pick spikes of a sea urchin or the mysterious orange dots on a sea cucumber. Interpreters were there to explain more about the creatures, integral parts of East Point’s ecosystem that are often overlooked. They made certain that the animals were handled with respect and returned to the ocean.

Of course, not to be forgotten a male and a female Transient Orcas swam by, followed closely by whale watching boats. The crowd congregated to watch the small show, brought together by nature’s seemingly perfect timing.

How much do you know about your ecosystem, from the smallest invertebrates to the top predators, to our own human impact? From the old fog alarm building on East Point I watch every day as commercial ships move, larger than life, down Boundary Pass. I see whale watching boats chase playful Orcas just to get the perfect picture.

From this point at the heart of the Salish Sea, contemplating the life teeming around me, it became even more apparent to me that this marine world, beautiful and fragile, deserves our protection.

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Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area
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Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area

[caption id="attachment_28359" align="alignleft" width="90"]Daniel Daniel Patterson, Guest Blogger.[/caption] This blog was written by guest blogger Daniel Patterson. The Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area is an astounding piece of Canadian wetland, nestled between the mountains in the southwest corner of British Columbia. Saddling the south end of Kootenay Lake and continuing to the United States border, spanning 17,000 acres, this wetland protected area was established by the province in 1968 and is now home to more than 392 different species of wildlife. The area plays host to more than 100,000 birds at a time during migration, including the Greater White-fronted Geese and Tundra Swans, as well as a great many other migrating waterfowl. The diverse landscape and well-populated areas around the site include the only known breeding ground in British Columbia for Forster’s Terns, and, similarly, are home to one of two known breeding populations of the Northern Leopard Frog in British Columbia. In the summer months, it’s also possible to find the American White Pelican - a species rarely found beyond the prairies - in the area. The wetland is home to a great many ospreys, but as well to Western Grebes who are a provincially at-risk species (in May of 2010, approximately 1,000 - 1,500 were seen on Duck Lake during the migration period, likely the largest amount recorded at the wetland.) [caption id="attachment_28360" align="alignright" width="300"]Image of Bridge and reflections at Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area Bridge and reflections at Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area, Creston, British Columbia. Flickr Photo by Arthur Chapman (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)[/caption] Plant life is also abundant in and important to the wetland. Pondweeds, duckweed, arrowheads and watershield (dollar bonnet) are just some of the species of plants which thrive in the shallow and warm waters of the Creston Valley Wetland. Similarly, the exceptionally large density of aquatic plant life helps to provide many animals the necessities of life, including shelter, food and a healthy habitat, keeping land erosion at bay. This, however, is not all the wetland provides - the wetland also is a great place for creatures of the human variety to spend the day exploring, with activities and guided tours provided by the park staff. Similarly, the Dewdney Trail has given the public and researchers access to the area. Before the designation of this area, the Ktunaxa nation - a population whose history in the Creston Valley can be traced back to over 10,000 years - was the only human population who inhabited the land. The biodiversity of this wetland is amazing and plays a tremendous role in the fruitful existence and regeneration of species and animal life in the southern part of British Columbia. Protected by the Creston Valley Wildlife Management Area staff and volunteers, the wetland is preserved and treated with respect and care, fostering life for all living entities that inhabit the land.

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Bird Tweet of the Week: Mourning Warbler
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Bird Tweet of the Week: Mourning Warbler

[caption id="attachment_28346" align="alignleft" width="300"]Image of a Mourning Warbler Flickr, Isaac Sanchez[/caption] Despite the gloomy sounding common name, this warblers scientific name makes reference to Philadelphia. Ornithologist Alexander Wilson had first described the species during its migration through that city. Check out this week's tweet to learn more about this bird and how it goes to great lengths to protect its young! Each week we introduce a new bird from the Ottawa-Gatineau area through our segment on CBC Radio’s In Town and Out. Alex MacDonald, Nature Canada’s Manager of Protected Areas, shares interesting facts about the birds that live in our communities. Be sure to tune-in to “Bird Tweet of the Week” on CBC Radio One 91.5 FM on Saturday mornings from 6am to 9am and listen to past episodes on our website. This episode aired on Saturday July 16th, 2016. [button link="http://naturecanada.ca/what-we-do/naturehood/bird-e-book-series/" size="medium" target="_self" icon="leaf" color="blue" lightbox="false"]Catch up on facts about both backyard and at-risk birds with our new e-Book series![/button]

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